Southern Illinois University

Southern Illinois University


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Southern Illinois University, located in Carbondale, is one of the most comprehensive public universities in Illinois. It is the anchor instituton of the Southern Illinois University system, a multi-campus university.The history of Southern Illinois University dates to 1869, when Southern Illinois Normal University began with 12 academic departments. In 1947, the state legislature renamed SINU to Southern Illinois University.In 1970, Southern Illinois University’s campus, known as Southern Illinois University Carbondale, was separated from its satellite campus in Edwardsville.The Southern Illinois University Carbondale includes the College of Agricultural Sciences, College of Business and Administration, College of Education and Human Services, College of Engineering, College of Liberal Arts, College of Mass Communication and Media Arts, College of Science, the Graduate School, School of Law, School of Medicine, and College of Applied Sciences and Arts. Through those colleges and schools the university offers a wide range of programs, including bachelor's and master’s degrees in a variety of majors, professional degrees in law and medicine, and doctoral degrees.In addition, the university offers distance education programs, continuing education programs, and military programs at bases throughout the country.The Morris Library, located on the university campus, holds more than 2.4 million volumes, 3.1 million microform units, and more than 12,500 current periodicals and serials. In addition, the Law Library has a well-rounded collection of current and historical materials.The university’s museum is committed to collect, preserve, research, and exhibit a wide range of artifacts reflecting the arts, humanities, and sciences. It offers opportunities in the practice of museology and provides leadership and assistance for museums throughout Southern Illinois.Southern Illinois University also provides several residential options in a safe and affordable environment. Students can choose from residential halls and apartments.


History of Southern Illinois

The Zeigler Coal company in Franklin County purchased the latest machinery to mine coal in 1901-1902. The owner, Joseph Leiter, inherited the mine after his father passed away and hoped to run an efficient and profitable mining operation. Since the mine was highly mechanized for its time, the owner refused to recognize the Coal Miners Union scale for wages that were based on tons of coal mined by hand. As soon as coal was hoisted to the surface, coal miners went on strike and trouble began. Leiter brought in strikebreakers to work his mines and violence ensued for several years. A series of underground methane gas explosions caused considerable loss of life and convinced Leiter to close his mine for good in 1909.

When the United States entered into World War I, the federal government looked to the agricultural states to increase food production. Despite a shortage of farm workers, Illinois did its part to support the war effort, including the farmers in Southern Illinois. Virgil Marks of Murphysboro, a soldier in the Great War, described the combat action in France some 75 years later, They killed them all around me it looked like just for the fun of it. Out of 245 men, there was only 28 of us walked off. The rest were shot.

As soon as the War ended, a surplus of airplanes were converted into mail carriers or were purchased by daring young pilots, called barnstormers. Many Illinoisans saw their first airplane while standing in near a farmers barn watching daredevils fly overhead.

While the post World War I years were prosperous for many, they were troubled times for Southern Illinois coal miners. When Union miners all over the nation went on strike in 1922, Williamson County mine owner William Lester was given permission by the miners Union to continue uncovering coal in his strip mine but was not allowed to dig it up or ship it to market during the strike.

Refusing to listen to warnings of trouble, Lester dismissed his Union miners and brought in strikebreakers and guards to load and ship his unearthed coal. Union miners attacked the railroad cars hauling coal and soon surrounded the Lester Mine while its guards and strikebreakers were there. The mine supervisor called the local sheriff and reported that over 500 shots had been fired by both sides, but help never arrived.

Following an all night siege, the mines guards and strikebreakers surrendered to the Union miners the next morning and were marched toward the town of Herrin in Williamson County where they were told they would be released. Vengeance overwhelmed the angry crowd, however, as they chased and shot unarmed prisoners before reaching Herrin. Twenty people died and some of the bodies were mutilated. Although several miners were indicted, no one was successfully convicted of these crimes. After this massacre, Williamson County was to be known as Bloody Williamson.

The 18th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, which was ratified in 1919, prohibited the manufacture and sale of alcohol. This caused a strong reaction including the rise of bootleggers and gangsters even in Southern Illinois. Some bootleggers in Southern Illinois were foreigners or Catholic. The Ku Klux Klan had always been against these groups and saw a chance to further its cause. Clansmen in Williamson County first appeared in 1923. They appointed themselves defenders of the public morals and raided many bootleg operations.

Later the Clansmen were deputized by a former government agent turned local lawman, S. Glen Young, and raided suspected operations, shooting up their places and engaging in gun fights with bootleggers. Glen Young's career came to an end when he and three other men were killed in a shoot-out in a drugstore in Herrin, Illinois.

The Shelton and Birger gangs operated in Southern Illinois in the 1920s. Shoot-outs between these and other rival gangsters and between law enforcement officers were common. After being convicted of ordering the murder of the mayor of West City, the leader of the Birger gang, Charlie Birger, was condemned to be hanged in 1928. The killings continued, however, as nearly 50 members of the Shelton clan were murdered or died under mysterious circumstances over the next 20 years.

Tornados and violent thunderstorms have always plagued this region. The worst tornado devastated the town of Murphysboro in 1925. It cut a 219-mile swath across Missouri, Illinois, and Indiana. The official death toll was 689, with 210 killed in Murphysboro alone, but scores more never were accounted for. Other notable tornados occurred in 1957, again in Murphysboro, and in 1982 in Marion.

The stock market crash of 1929 and the Great Depression of the 1930s caused coal miners to lose their jobs when mine after mine closed. Farmers could not sell their crops and lost their land, families defaulted on their home mortgage loans, and young people from the region began leaving for the cities to find work and a better life.

Many of the banks in the area went bankrupt and people paid their bills with post office money orders and postage stamps, or traded and bartered for goods. Occasional welfare orders provided some relief for poor families and President Roosevelt's New Deal WPA program provided intermittent jobs. But many people in the region were too proud to accept much help or accept help for too long.

The people in Southern Illinois did whatever they could to get by, such as using candles instead of electricity for light, stopping newspaper and magazine subscriptions, and conserving water or even digging a well to get water free. People saved and reused all sorts of small items including buttons, old clothes, used paper, lumber and bricks, and sundry other items.

When the U.S. entered World War II in 1941, it was supported in Southern Illinois, as elsewhere, with people working in military production and with their Victory Gardens. An ordnance plant in the Crab Orchard Wildlife Refuse in Southern Illinois was built and worked around the clock to supply the military with ammunition and other ordnances. The plant is still in use today making ammunition for commercial sale. Because the crops farmers grew were going directly to the government for the War effort, everyone used every spare space in their yards or nearby fields to grow food. These gardens were called Victory Gardens.

The regions economy was better after World War II. Miners found work in the coal fields and new industry and jobs seemed to spring up nearly everywhere.

In 1951, the second worst mine disaster in the states history took place at the New Orient Coal Mine near West Frankfort in Southern Illinois. Sparks from electrical equipment touched off a pocket of methane gas, killing 119 miners. This resulted in the federal Coal Mine Safety Act of 1952 updated mine safety laws and provided for more stringent inspections of mines.

Many public schools consolidated after the War. The days of the one-room school houses and small, rural schools was rapidly coming to an end. More emphasis was given to secondary and higher education. Southern Illinois University Carbondale grew rapidly in size from 3,500 to over 23,000 students between 1950 to 1980.

Junior Colleges, the forerunner of today's Community Colleges, were initially viewed by some as extensions of local high schools. The enacted of the Junior College Act of 1965 gave them better funding and allowed for the building of campuses and extended curricula. Shawnee, Southeastern Illinois, Rend Lake, and John A. Logan Community Colleges are all located in Southern Illinois.

There were demonstrations in Southern Illinois to support the Civil Rights movement in the 1960s. Some disturbances were reported, particularly after the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King in 1968.

During the Vietnam War in the late 1960s, the antiwar movement spread to Southern Illinois University Carbondale. After the shootings at Kent State University in 1970, riots in Carbondale closed down the campus and ended the University's school year prematurely.

In the 1970s and 1980s, Halloween was celebrated by large crowds, estimated to be as large as 20,000 people. These large crowds took to the streets in downtown Carbondale in Halloween costumes. The celebration was peaceful and entertaining for many years but turned more violent with property damage, looting, and arson in the 1980s. Officials of the City and Southern Illinois University took measures to end the party by closing the campus and its dormitories and preventing bars and liquor establishments from selling alcohol for several days around Halloween. These measures have effectively stopped the gathering of large crowds and ended the Halloween tradition in Carbondale.

Surrounded by rivers, floods have plagued the region for decades. The Great Flood of 1993 on the Mississippi River, a smaller flood on the Mississippi and Ohio rivers and their tributaries in 1995, and flash flooding along the Ohio River in 1997 cause a great deal of property damage but no reported loss of life in Southern Illinois.

The Fayville Levee near Miller City in Alexander County was breeched in the flood of 1993 that allowed thousands of acres of farmland and many homes in the area to be flooded. Subsequent rains and high water in the Spring of 1994 continued the problem. High water and storms in 1995 caused damage in Perry County and flooding along the Ohio River basin in Saline and Gallatin counties caused property damage to some homes and farmland. Many older people were evacuated during these periods of natural disaster.

Unemployment generally higher in the southern region of the state with many of its counties exhibiting the highest unemployment rates in the state. Only Jackson County, where Southern Illinois University is located, has had an unemployment rate consistently lower than that of the U.S. or state.

Due to its high unemployment rate, communities in Southern Illinois have become more aggressive in seeking economic opportunities. Jobs associated with the building and operation of prison facilities have been sought for the region. There are currently two federal (both in Marion, IL) and many state Correctional facilities located in the southernmost 13 counties of Illinois. Inmates in these facilities are from all regions of the state.

Southern Illinois has many beautiful natural attractions and sites. Site-seeing, hunting, fishing, camping, backpacking, climbing, rappelling, hiking and other related outdoor activities are abundant in the region.


Contents

On June 20, 2019, Southern Illinois University Director of Athletics Jerry Kill announced Lance Rhodes as the program's new head coach. Rhodes is a Sikeston, Missouri, native, and joined the Saluki baseball program from the University of Missouri, where he had served as the head assistant and recruiting coordinator. Prior to his time at the University of Missouri, Rhodes served as the recruiting coordinator at Southeast Missouri State University helping them to three years of program dominance by winning three straight Ohio Valley Conference championships (2014, 2015, 2016). [ citation needed ]

SIU baseball started as a club sport in 1921, lasting until 1924. From 1925 until 1946, the school did not have a baseball program.

In 1947, Abe Martin revived the program as an intercollegiate sport and it has remained ever since, being an elite program in the late 1960s through the 1980s.

SIU plays its home games at Itchy Jones Stadium. [2]

SIU has a proud history in the NCAA Baseball Tournament, held in Omaha since 1950 and at Johnny Rosenblatt Stadium from 1950 through 2010. They have made the College World Series 5 times and finished as the national champion runner-up twice (losing out to the University of Southern California Trojans both times) and as third-place finishers twice.

Year Record Pct Notes
1966 0–2 .000 Eliminated by Valparaiso
1967 1–2 .333 Eliminated by Western Michigan
1968 6–2 .750 Eliminated by USC in championship game
College World Series (2nd place)
1969 3–2 .600 Eliminated by Ole Miss
College World Series (7th place)
1970 2–2 .500 Eliminated by Ohio
1971 7–3 .700 Eliminated by USC in championship game College World Series (2nd place)
1973 2–2 .500 Eliminated by Minnesota
1974 7–3 .500 Eliminated by USC in CWS semifinals
College World Series (3rd place)
1976 0–2 .000 Eliminated by Michigan
1977 6–2 .750 Eliminated by Arizona State in CWS Semifinals College World Series (3rd place)
1978 2–2 .500 Eliminated by Oral Roberts
1981 1–2 .333 Eliminated by Oral Roberts
1986 1–2 .333 Eliminated by Texas
1990 2–2 .500 Eliminated by San Diego State
TOTALS 40–30 .571

Coach Years Record
Lance Rhodes 2020–present 0-0
Ken Henderson 2011–2019 241–294–1
Dan Callahan 1995–2010 442–447–1
Sam Riggelman 1991–1994 82–114–1
Richard "Itchy" Jones 1970–1990 738–345–5
Joe Lutz 1966–1969 130–48–2
Abe Martin 1947–1965 277–155–2
William McAndrew 1921–1924 20–6
    , current Major League Baseball pitcher for the Philadelphia Phillies , Retired Major League Baseball outfielder [4] , Retired Major League Baseballcenter fielder, 5-time Gold Glove winner, 2-time All-Star[4] , Major League Baseball pitcher for the Toronto Blue Jays, Chicago White Sox, Texas Rangers and Kansas City Royals[4] , Retired Major League Baseball pitcher [4] , Major League Baseball second baseman for the San Diego Padres[4] , Retired Major League Baseball second baseman, announcer, commentator for EA Sports baseball video games [4] , Former Major League Baseball pitcher currently pitching for the Newark Bears of the independent Atlantic League. [4] , current Major League Baseball1st base coach for the Washington Nationals[4] , Retired Major League Baseball pitcher, 7 Time All-Star, Pitched No-Hitter on September 2, 1990. [4] , Retired Major League Baseball infielder [4]
  1. ^"Primary & Supplementary Color Palette" . Retrieved April 29, 2020 .
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  3. "SIU dedicates Itchy Jones Stadium with grand opening - Southern Illinois University". Southern Illinois University . Retrieved May 10, 2018 .
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  5. "History of SIU baseball from 2010 media guide" . Retrieved June 14, 2010 .
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  7. "Southern Illinois University Baseball Players Who Made it to the Major Leagues" . Retrieved June 23, 2007 .

This article about a baseball team in Illinois is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.


History | Touch of Nature Environmental Center | SIU

1949 - Dr. William "Bill" Freeberg returned to SIU to establish a specialization after becoming the first in the country to complete a Doctorate of Recreation at Indiana University. Both Morris and Freeberg would soon work together to create what is now Touch of Nature Environmental Center.

1949 - At a national conference, a need for outdoor education as part of the national educational curriculum was recognized. The Board of Trustees granted President Morris and Dr. Freeberg the authority to negotiate leases on land in the Little Grassy Lake area from the Department of Interior.

1950 - The Board of Trustees authorized options along the western shores of Little Grassy Lake, and the University acquired 150 acres of land from the Federal Fish and Wildlife Service.

1954 - A Master Plan for the development of the Little Grassy Lake site was approved by the SIU Board of Trustees, and was accepted by the Fish and Wildlife Service in February. The development of the University's outdoor education program was sponsored jointly by the University and by the Educational Council of 100. 

1954 - Department of Recreation and Outdoor Education was established. Part of the new Department's responsibility included the supervision and development of a camping program at the Little Grassy Lake Campus. William Freeberg was appointed Chairman of the Department.

1959 - Lloyd Burgess (L.B.) Sharp, pioneer in outdoor education, accepted a faculty position at Southern Illinois University Carbondale. He relocated the Outdoor Education Association to campus and influenced the establishment of the outdoor experiential education facility Touch of Nature Environmental Center. National Camp closed in 1962. Sharp died in 1963.

1963 - The Little Grassy Lake Campus was made a separate unit, no longer administered by the Department of Recreation and Outdoor Education, and the name was changed to Little Grassy Facilities. William F. Price was appointed Coordinator.

1968 - Little Grassy Facilities became the central campus for the larger surrounding Outdoor Laboratory.

1969 - Hank Schafermeyer, a forestry graduate student at SIU, with the help of Tony Calabrese, started the Underway Adventures program.  Schafermeyer based the program off of the Outward Bound program, a week-long program giving coed youths and adults a taste of rock climbing, high ropes courses, team building and other outdoor activities.

1972 - The National Park Service named Touch of Nature a National Environmental Education Landmark.  This distinguished honor was only given to 11 sites around the United States with Touch of Nature as the first of its kind in the nation.

1973 - SIU's Outdoor Laboratory changed its name to Touch of Nature Environmental Center.

1974 - Year round programming began to be offered.

1978 - Soon after retiring, William Freeberg started the Friends of Touch of Nature, a group dedicated to raising funds and awareness about Camp Little Giant. 

1980 - With the cooperation and contracts with the Illinois Department of Children and Family Services, and the Department of Corrections, a Youth Advocacy Program was initiated. The program later took the name Spectrum Wilderness Therapy.

1980 - Camp Little Giant was awarded the Eleanor P. Eells Award by the American Camping Association.

1991 - In honor of his hard work and dedication, the Camp II dining hall at Touch of Nature was named Freeberg Hall. In keeping with Dr. Freeberg's lifelong pursuit, a living memorial in the form of an endowed scholarship fund has been established.

1995 - The Wilderness Education Association held their national conference at Touch of Nature. The keynote speaker was the legendary outdoor educator Paul Petzoldt.

1999 - Camp Little Giant starts Dyna Camp, a camp for children with attention deficit disorder and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.

2006 - The Environmental Education Program starts Eco Camp. A weekly theme-based environmental day camp for children.

2009 - The Underway Adventures Program starts Wild Outdoor Week (WOW) Camp. An adventure-based day camp for children entering grades 5-8.  

2013 - SIU's Department of Health Education and Recreation started offering classes at Touch of Nature. The classes include Land Navigation, Backpacking, Canoeing, Leave No Trace Trainer, Rock Climbing, Therapeutic Recreation and Wilderness Medicine.

2014 - SIU alumni JD Tanner becomes Director of Touch of Nature Environmental Center. 

2014 - The Therapeutic Recreation Program started a fall respite camp for adults with developmental disabilities. The camp is a partnership with the Recreation Department, as well as being an experiential class for students studying Therapeutic Recreation.

2015 - Touch of Nature hosted Dawg Days, an extended orientation for incoming SIU freshmen.  

2017 - Touch of Nature hosted Camp BETA, a residential camp for children with diabetes.  

2018 - Touch of Nature celebrated the 50th Anniversary of the Special Olympics with Change the Game Day.  Sledgefoot Lounge was renamed Burke Lounge after Justice Ann Burke who was instrumental in developing the first Special Olympics in Chicago in July, 1968.  

2018 - The intern house, known as the "Red House," was named the Cavaletto House, in honor of Illinois State Representative John Cavaletto for his work with Camp Little Giant and Dr. Freeberg in the 50's and early 60's.  That same day, the Camp 1 Dining Hall was named Schafermayer Hall in honor of Underway Adventures cofounder Hank Schafermayer who passed away in December, 2017.  


Museum Hours

The Museum is currently closed for the installation of upcoming exhibitions and will reopen on July 6, 2021.

Tuesday - Friday: 10am - 4pm
Saturday: 1 - 4pm
Sunday, Monday, and University Holidays: Closed

Visitors must follow COVID-19 response measures.

  • Masks are required at all times.
  • Attendance is limited to 25 persons per hall.
  • Guests must maintain social distancing (6 feet) from other visitors.

Public metered parking available across from the Student Center and beside Woody Hall.


Contents

An Act of the Twenty-sixth General Assembly of Illinois, approved March 9, 1869, created Southern Illinois Normal College, the second state-supported normal school in Illinois. [12] Carbondale held the ceremony of cornerstone laying, May 17, 1870. [13] The first historic session of Southern Illinois Normal University was a summer institute, with a first faculty of eight members and an enrollment of 53 students. [14] It was renamed Southern Illinois University in 1947.

The university continued primarily as a teacher's college until Delyte W. Morris took office as president of the university in 1948. Morris was SIU's longest-serving president (1948–1970). [15] During his presidency, Morris transformed SIU, adding Colleges of Law, Medicine and Dentistry. Southern Illinois University grew rapidly in size from 3,500 to over 24,800 students between 1950 and 1991. [16]

In 1957, a second campus of SIU was established at Edwardsville. This school, now known as Southern Illinois University Edwardsville, is an independent university within the SIU system.

SIU offered the first program to provide support to students with specific learning disabilities at a college level. "Project Achieve" was founded at SIU by Barbara Cordoni Kupiec in 1978. She pursued a career in the field initially to help her own children, and left behind a legacy that has assisted several thousand other students in earning their degrees. In 1983, Project Achieve became the Clinical Center Achieve program when SIUC decided to institutionalize the program, making it a permanent part of the university's structure.

Randy Dunn was the eighth president of the Southern Illinois University System. [17] In July 2018, he stepped down as SIU system president after emails published in The Southern Illinoisan and The Daily Egyptian revealed he was attempting to divide the SIU system and help Southern Illinois University Edwardsville become the primary campus for the Southern Illinois University System by concealing over $5 million in funds transferred from Southern Illinois University Carbondale to Southern Illinois University Edwardsville. [18] He was also implicated in several unethical hires and found at fault by the Illinois Office of Executive Inspector General for improperly hiring his former colleague, Brad Colwell. [19] Dunn was replaced by J. Kevin Dorsey, a retired dean from the SIU School of Medicine. [20]

Carlo Montemagno, a professor of engineering, became chancellor of SIU Carbondale on August 15, 2017. He died on October 11, 2018. [21] Austin Lane, formerly of Texas Southern University, was appointed chancellor in 2020. [22]

USNWR graduate school rankings [29]

USNWR departmental rankings [29]

SIU offers more than 300 [9] [30] academic degree programs across all levels: bachelors, masters, PhD and doctoral. It also offers professional programs in architecture, [31] business, law and medicine. Since 1989, SIU has offered an MD/JD dual degree program, [32] leading to the concurrent award of both degrees after completion of six years of coursework. [32] [33]

The university is classified among "R2: Doctoral Universities – High research activity." [34] In the academic year 2017-2018 the university was awarded over $78 million in research grants, the largest of which were to the School of Medicine and the College of Science. [35]

SIU Carbondale is ranked #258 overall among "National Universities" in the 2021 edition of annual college rankings by US News & World Report. [36] At SIU, 59% of the classes have 19 or fewer students 82% of classes have less than 29 students, only 5% of classes include 50 or more students. The ratio of students to faculty is 15 to 1 and the percentage of full-time faculty is 83 percent. [37] Additionally, the National Science Foundation ranks SIU No. 75 among public universities in the U.S. for total research and development expenditures, and No. 64 among earned doctorates. [38]

The Princeton Review ranked SIU in its 2017 list of "Best Midwestern" and "Green Colleges" as well as ranking it #43 in the "Top 50 Game Design: Ugrad" list. [39]

College Year founded
College of Agricultural Sciences [40] 1955
College of Applied Sciences & Arts [41] 1950
College of Business [42] 1957
College of Education & Human Services [43] 1869
College of Engineering [44] 1961
College of Liberal Arts [45] 1943
College of Mass Communication & Media Arts [46] 1993
College of Science [45] 1943
School of Law 1972
School of Medicine 1970

College of Agricultural Sciences Edit

The College of Agricultural Sciences consists of four academic departments: Agribusiness Economics, Animal Science, Food & Nutrition, Forestry, and Plant, Soil & Agricultural Systems. There are eight majors and twenty-six specializations. The college's Ph.D. program was added in December 2007. The Ph.D. in Agricultural Sciences is a research degree that prepares graduates for developing and funding their own research program, and for teaching graduate and undergraduate students. [47]

College of Applied Sciences and Arts Edit

Since its inception as the Vocational Technical Institute, CASA has undergone continuous change to address the workforce needs in the southern Illinois region, the state and the nation. The College presently includes four schools which house three master's degree programs, fourteen baccalaureate, and two associate degree programs. The masters of science in Medical Dosimetry and one baccalaureate program, Fire Service Management, are offered off-campus only. CASA provides off-campus opportunities to receive baccalaureate degrees in the areas of Aviation Management, Electronic Systems Technologies, Fire Service Management, Health Care Management, and Medical Dosimetry. The baccalaureate degree in Information Systems Technologies is offered online. Forty-nine hours of upper-level and selected elective courses are available to students at various locations throughout the country. [48]

Libraries Edit

Morris Library is the main library for the Southern Illinois University Carbondale campus. The library holds more than 4 million volumes, 53,000 current periodicals and serials, and over 3.6 million microform units. Morris Library also provides access to the statewide automated library system and to an array of electronic sources. [49] [50] These figures make Morris Library among the top 50 largest research libraries in the United States. Library users have access to I-Share (the statewide automated library system) and to a comprehensive array of databases and other electronic data files. As the campus center for access to academic information and collaborative academic technology projects, Morris Library provides a wide range of services, including reference assistance, instructional and technical support, distance learning, geographic information systems (GIS), and multimedia courseware development. Morris Library is a member of the Consortium of Academic and Research Libraries in Illinois (CARLI), Association of Research Libraries (ARL), and the Greater Western Library Alliance (GWLA). Delyte's, a new coffee shop named after former SIU President Delyte W. Morris, operates near the entrance of the library. [51]

The SIU Law Library provides legal research resources for lawyers, law students, SIU faculty and staff and members of the community. Located in the Lesar Law Building, the library has evolved to meet the changing nature of legal research and user expectations by providing wireless access to a wide array of electronic legal materials. [52]

Student Center Edit

With over 8 acres (3.24 ha) of floor space, the SIU Student Center is one of the largest student unions in the nation. [53] The programs and services offered provide SIU students, faculty, and staff a place to relax, gather a group to study or grab a bite to eat. The Student Center hosts multiple dining locations, the University Bookstore, ATM and Western Union stations, bowling & billiards facility, check cashing services, the ID Card office, and Debit Dawg activations and deposits all under one roof. The Student Center offers several ballrooms and smaller, expandable conference rooms for small or large gatherings. Student-run radio station WIDB 104.3 FM [54] broadcasts from the Student Center, and the Black Affairs Office, International Student Council, Student Programming Council, student governments and the Greek Council have offices in the building.


Junior Aviator I

Junior Aviator I

Date: 6/28/2021

All Day Event

All day event: Grades 6-8 Visit our website for information on registration and pricing.

Esports Boot Camp 101

Esports Boot Camp 101

Date: 6/28/2021

All Day Event

All day event: Ages 12-15 Visit our website for information on registration and pricing.

Hand-Built Clay Dinner Party

Hand-Built Clay Dinner Party

Date: 6/28/2021

All Day Event

All day event: Grades 1-3/4-8 Visit our website for information on registration and pricing.


Architectural Studies | Art, Architecture, and Design | SIU

Designs heal. Or inspire. Or preserve historical integrity. Architects do more than draft blueprints. They build and define entire communities.

At SIU Carbondale, you'll learn from licensed, renowned architects in our highly selective program. Your teachers and mentors here will foster civic involvement, facilitate project management experience and guide you through the holistic design process—while encouraging personal research interests and channeling individual creativity.

Discover your own unique visual voice—alongside award-winning faculty and collaborative peers—in a positive, passion-driven studio atmosphere.


Humanities (6 hours) | University Core Curriculum | SIU

Humanities courses develop our imaginative and analytical capacities through the use of texts from diverse times, cultures, philosophies and religions, and through the development of ideas by means of oral and written expression.  To understand what it means to be human, one must understand oneself in relation to others, reflect on ideas and presuppositions from one's own and other cultures, and respond creatively.

In addition to the courses listed below, the UCC Humanities requirement can be satisfied by taking a third semester of a foreign language or a course in Latin or Classical Greek.

AD 207A-3 Studies the origins and nature of art in a variety of ancient civilizations from around the world, such as Ancient Egypt, Greece, China and the Americas. Sculptures, painting, archi­tecture, metalwork, ceramics, textiles and other art works are studied in their social and historical contexts, with consider­ation of issues of style, subject matter, meaning, technique and aesthetics. 

This class fulfills the core curriculum for: Humanities

AD 207B-3 Studies art from An­cient Rome to the Early Renaissance in Europe, Africa and Asia. Sculptures, paintings, architecture, metalwork, ceramics, textiles and other art works are studied in their social and his­torical contexts, with consideration of issues of style, subject matter, meaning, technique and aesthetics.

This class fulfills the core curriculum for: Humanities

AD 207C-3 This class studies art from the Renaissance to the present from around the world. Sculptures, painting, architecture, metalwork, ceramics, tex­tiles and other art works are studied in their social and his­torical contexts, with consideration of issues of style, subject matter, meaning, technique and aesthetics. 

This class fulfills the core curriculum for: Humanities

358-3 Art of Small Scale Cultures. (Advanced University Core Curriculum course) Covers a broad range of arts of Africa, Native North America, Pre-Columbian America, Oceania, primarily sculpture in wood, metal and shell, body decoration and fibers, ceramics, architecture, masking and performance arts of small scale villages role of the artist, ancient technologies.

This class fulfills the core curriculum for: Humanities

AD 368-3 Pre-Columbian Art. (Advanced University Core Curriculum course) Considers stone sculpture and architecture, fiber arts, ceramics, metal and 2-D arts of Meso-, Central, and South America of the Pre-Columbian era. Considers ancient technologies, hieroglyphic and calendrical systems and some post contact arts.

This class fulfills the core curriculum for: Humanities

Elementary Chinese - 1 The basic skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing.  No previous knowledge of Chinese required.  Must be taken in A,B sequence.  Lab fee: $2 per credit hour.

This class fulfills the core curriculum for: Humanities

CHIN 201A -3 Intermediate Chinese  Development of listening, speaking, reading, and writing on the intermediate level.  Must be taken in A,B sequence.  Prerequisite:  CHIN 120B with a grade of C or better, or consent of instructor.

This class fulfills the core curriculum for: Humanities

CHIN 370-3  Contemporary China  A study of customs, habits, beliefs and traditions operating in China today.  Taught in English.  This course satisfies the CoLA Writing-Across-the-Curriculum requirement.  Prerequisite: East Asian 102 or consent of instructor.

This class fulfills the core curriculum for: Humanities

Course Description: 130A-3 Elementary Classical Greek. (University Core Curriculum) The object of this course is to give students a firm foundation in the grammar, vocabulary, and syntax of Ancient Greek in order to enable them to progress to the reading of the Greek classics and New Testament. Must be taken in A,B sequence. No previous knowledge of Greek required. Lab fee: $2 per credit hour.

𧆂B-3 Elementary Classical Greek. (University Core Curriculum) The object of this course is to give students a firm foundation in the grammar, vocabulary, and syntax of Ancient Greek in order to enable them to progress to the reading of the Greek classics and New Testament. Must be taken in A,B sequence. No previous knowledge of Greek required. Prerequisite: CLAS 130A. Lab fee: $2 per credit hour.

This class fulfills the core curriculum for: Humanities

CLAS 133A,B - 3 Elementary Latin. (Advanced University Core Curriculum Course) Students will acquire a firm foundation in the grammar, vocabulary, and syntax of Latin in order to enable them to progress to the reading of Latin literature in the original. Must be taken in A,B sequence. No previous knowledge of Latin required. Lab fee: $2 per credit hour.

This class fulfills the core curriculum for: Humanities

CLAS 201A,B-3 Intermediate Greek  Reading and interpretation of selected works by authors such as Xenophon, Plato, Homer, and The New Testament writers.  Must be taken in A,B sequence.  Prerequisite:  CLAS 130B with a grade of C or better, or one year of proficiency credit.

This class fulfills the core curriculum for: Humanities

CLAS 202A-3 Intermediate Latin. (University Core Curriculum) Reading from authors such as Livy, Caesar, and Cicero. Must be taken in A,B sequence. Prerequisite: CLAS 133B with a grade of C or better, one year of proficiency credit.

CLAS 202B-3  Intermediate Latin  Reading from authors such as Livy, Caesar, and Cicero.  Must be taken in A,B sequence.  Prerequisite:  CLAS 202A with a passing grade.

This class fulfills the core curriculum for: Humanities

CLAS 230-3 An inquiry into the nature of myth and its relevance today while studying selected myths principally of the Greeks and Ro­mans. 

This class fulfills the core curriculum for: Humanities

CLAS 270-3 An introduction to the life and culture of ancient Greece. Greek contributions to western civili­zation in literature, art, history, and philosophy. No knowledge of Greek or Latin is required. 

This class fulfills the core curriculum for: Humanities

CLAS 271-3 An introduction to the life and culture of ancient Rome. Rome’s function in assimilating, transforming, and passing on the Greek literary and intellec­tual achievement. Rome’s own contributions in the political, social, and cultural spheres. No knowledge of Greek or Latin is required.

This class fulfills the core curriculum for: Humanities

CLAS 304-3 Ancient Philosophy. (Advanced University Core Curriculum course) (Same as PHIL 304) The birth of Western philosophy in the Greek world, examining such Pre-Socratics as Anaximander, Heraclitus, Pythagoras, and Parmenides focusing upon the flowering of the Athenian period with Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle. The course will conclude with a discussion of the Hellenistic systems of Stoicism, Epicureanism, and the Neo-Platonic mysticism of Plotinus of the Roman period. Fulfills CoLA Writing-Across-the-Curriculum requirement. Satisfies University Core Curriculum Humanities requirement in lieu of 102.

This class fulfills the core curriculum for: Humanities

CLAS 315I-3 to 9 Specific aspects of Clas­sical Civilization are compared with aspects of our own society. In alternate years, the course will treat different themes, e.g., Drama’s birthplace: Classical Athens Roman heroes and Anti-Heroes, or Athletics, Sports and Games in the Ancient World. When offered in Europe, the course will focus on how these val­ues are reflected in architecture, art, the military and the arena from ancient times through the Renaissance and beyond.

This class fulfills the core curriculum for: Humanities

CP 358I-3 (Same as HIST 358I) Introduces students to Peace Studies as an interdisciplinary field, focusing on the history, theory, and practice of alterna­tives to violence. Considers the structural and systemic reasons for violence and war the history of peace movements the role of media in escalating violence and providing solutions. Lecture-discussion format with presentations by speakers from a vari­ety of disciplines. No prerequisites. 

This class fulfills the core curriculum for: Humanities

EA 102-3 An in­troduction to East Asian cultural traditions, literature, philoso­phy, history, art and social organization of China and Japan. Formerly FL 102. Credit will not be granted for both FL 102 and EA 102. 

This class fulfills the core curriculum for: Humanities

EA 300-3  Masterpieces of East Asian Literatures  Lectures and collateral readings of representative oriental literary works in English translation with special attention to literary forms and throught from ancient to contemporary China and Japan.  No knowledge of an oriental language required.

This class fulfills the core curriculum for: Humanities

ENGL 121-3 The course offers a critical introduction to some of the most influential and representative work in the Western literary tra­dition. Emphasis is on the interconnections between literature and the philosophical and social thought that has helped to shape Western culture.

This class fulfills the core curriculum for: Humanities

ENGL 121H - 3 The Western Literary Tradition. (University Honors Program) (University Core Curriculum) [IAI Course: H3 900] The course offers a critical introduction to some of the most influential and representative work in the Western literary tradition. Emphasis is on the interconnections between literature and the philosophical and social thought that has helped to shape Western culture.

This class fulfills the core curriculum for: Humanities

ENGL 204-3 This course introduces the literature of the twentieth century using representative works from the begin­ning through the close of the century. Course material may be drawn from fiction, verse and drama, as well as including ex­amples from supporting media (film, performance). Course may be taken as a sequence to English 121, The Western Literary Tradition, but 121 is not a prerequisite for this course.

This class fulfills the core curriculum for: Humanities

ENGL 209 - 3 Introduction to Genre. (University Core Curriculum Course) [IAI Course: H3900] This course introduces students to critical readings of multiple literary genres and requires students to apply a variety of analyses, including approaches adapted from other disciplines, to texts in these genres. Prerequisites: ENGL 101 and 102 or 120H with grades of C or better.

This class fulfills the core curriculum for: Humanities

FL 120A,B-3  This course is designed for students who have had limited or no prior knowledge of American Sign Language (ASL).  The focus will be on developing visual readiness skills and developing both expressive and receptive skills in basic ASL for academic and social environments.  The course includes an introduction to conversational vocabulary, finger spelling, grammatical principles and sign order rules (syntax).  Information about the deaf community and deaf culture will also be introduced.  Must be taken in A,B sequence.  Prerequisite for FL 120B: FL 120A.  Lab fee: $2 per credit hour.

This class fulfills the core curriculum for: Humanities

FL 220A,B - 3 Intermediate American Sign Language (ASL)  This course is designed for students who have taken FL 120A,B or had some prior training in ASL.  The focus will be on continuing to develop both expressive and receptive skills in basic ASL for academic and social environments.  The course includes conversational vocabulary, finger spelling, grammatical principles, and sign order rules (syntax).  Information about deafness, deaf history and deaf language/performing arts will be covered as well as unique aspects of the American deaf community and deaf culture.  Must be taken in A,B sequence.  Prerequisite:  FL 120B or one year of proficiency credit.

This class fulfills the core curriculum for: Humanities

FL 320-3 Caribbean Cultures and Literatures. This course offers readings and discussions of cultures and literatures found in different countries of the Caribbean region. All readings and lectures in English.

This class fulfills the core curriculum for: Humanities

FL 330-3 French Culture Through Cinema. This course analyzes and discusses various aspects of French culture (history, geography, social and cultural life), as represented in cinema. Lecture, readings, discussions and films will be in English.

This class fulfills the core curriculum for: Humanities

FL 370 - 3  Deaf Culture  This course is designed to introduce students to American Sign Language (ASL) literature and the history of Deaf culture.  Information about the Deaf community, Deaf culture and history, ASL literature, including sign poetry and storytelling, folklore, and Deaf Theater will be covered.

This class fulfills the core curriculum for: Humanities

GEOL 329H - 3 Geomythology. (University Core Curriculum Course) (University Honors Course) Natural disasters have been the source of countless myths and legends throughout human history. This course will examine ways in which regional geology influenced ancient civilizations, and explore the possibility that some of their myths and legends preserve a record of actual geologic events. This class will include lectures, discussions, media sources and readings. An introductory geology course is recommended but not necessary. Prerequisites: GEOL 111, 220, 221 or 222 recommended. Restricted to University Honors Program students.

This class fulfills the core curriculum for: Humanities

GEOL 329I-3 Natural disasters have been the source of countless myths and legends throughout human his­tory. This course will examine ways in which regional geology influenced ancient civilizations, and explore the possibility that some of their myths and legends preserve a record of actual geo­logic events. This class will include lectures, discussions, media sources and readings. An introductory geology course is recom­mended but not necessary. Prere-quisite: GEOL 111, 220, 221 or 222 recommended. 

This class fulfills the core curriculum for: Humanities

GER 201A,B - 3  Intermediate German  Continued grammar and vocabulary of development through reading, writing, listening, and speaking German.  Up-to-date subject matter from film, politics, fine arts, literature and science will bring students to a deeper undersanding of the German language and culture.  Conducted primarilyin German.  Must be taken in A,B sequence.  Prerequisite:  GER 101B with a grade of C or better, or equivalent.

This class fulfills the core curriculum for: Humanities

GER 230-3 Germanic and Norse Mythology. (University Core Curriculum) GER 230 is an introductory course in Germanic and Norse mythology. It provides an overview of the beliefs and religious practices of the pre-Christian Germanic tribes and documents the afterlife of many of these myths in the contemporary world. All readings and lectures are in English.

This class fulfills the core curriculum for: Humanities

HIST 101A-3 A survey of various civilizations in the world from pre­history to the present with particular attention to non-western cultures. 

This class fulfills the core curriculum for: Humanities

HIST 101B-3 A survey of various civilizations in the world from prehistory to the present with particular attention to non-western cultures. 

This class fulfills the core curriculum for: Humanities

HIST 203-3 Democracy, Civil Engagement, and Leadership. (University Core Curriculum) This course explores the core themes of democracy, civil engagement, and leadership from ancient times to the present. It does so using an award-winning pedagogy called Reacting to the Past, which involves complex, collaborative role-playing games. Students take on historical roles and work to attain "victory objectives" while grappling with central historical texts. The class will conduct several Reacting games relating to the themes of democracy, civil engagement, and leadership.

This class fulfills the core curriculum for: Humanities

HIST 207-3 World History. (Advanced University Core Curriculum course) An investigation of select issues in societies of the world from pre-history through the 20th century, with a focus on primary source interpretation. Some sections of this course may be limited to History majors. Please consult with advisor and/or instructor.

This class fulfills the core curriculum for: Humanities

HIST 358I-3 (Same as CP 358I) Introduces students to Peace Studies as an interdisciplinary field, focusing on the history, theory, and practice of alterna­tives to violence. Considers the structural and systemic reasons for violence and war the history of peace movements the role of media in escalating violence and providing solutions. Lecture-discussion format with presentations by speakers from a vari­ety of disciplines. No prerequisites.

This class fulfills the core curriculum for: Humanities

INTL 300-3 Introduction to International Studies. This course takes an interdisciplinary approach to international studies. Students are introduced to interdisciplinary foundations of intercultural studies and theories of globalization. The students study various global issues, such as security, food, health, energy, and environment, and explore how these issues are interconnected in today's globalization. Through the course, the students are to build their own vision of global citizenship.

This class fulfills the core curriculum for: Humanities

Elementary Japanese 131A,B-3 Emphasis on basic skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing.  No previous knowledge of Japanese is required.  Must be taken in A,B sequence.

This class fulfills the core curriculum for: Humanities

Intermediate Japanese 201A,B-3  Development of listening, speaking, reading, and writing on the intermediate level.  Must be taken in A,B sequence.  Prerequisite: JPN 131B with a grade of C or better, one year of proficiencey credit, or consent of instructor.

This class fulfills the core curriculum for: Humanities

JPN 370 Contemporary Japan-3  A study of customs, habits, beliefs, values and etiquette in Japanese culture.  Instruction in English.  Prerequisite:  East Asian 102 or consent of instructor.

This class fulfills the core curriculum for: Humanities

JRNL 334 Ethics-Media/Culture/Society-3  The purpose of this course is to discuss what it means to act ethically.  Does it mean anything more than doing what is right?  Are ethics for a lawyer different from a journalist or priest or doctor?  How does society decide what is ethical behavior and what is not?

This class fulfills the core curriculum for: Humanities

JRNL 399 First Freedoms-3  The First Amendment protects citizens from the government and sets boundaries for democratic self-government.  The course encompasses free expression in all media-social, broadcastand cinema.  It explores tensions between law and ethics, press freedom and privacy, intellectual freedom and equality and liberty and security.

This class fulfills the core curriculum for: Humanities

LING 200-3 What distin­guishes humans from other animals? This course addresses how language is a uniquely human phenomenon by exploring issues in language and society and psychological aspects of language use. Topics include language in conversation, differ­ences between speakers of different ages/genders/regions/social groups, first and second language acquisition, bilingualism, language meaning and change, and the relationship between language and culture.

This class fulfills the core curriculum for: Humanities

MATH 300I-3 This course examines how diverse cultures and history from the ancient past to the present have shaped the development of mathematical thought and how developing mathematical ideas have influenced his­tory and society. Particular attention will be given to the evolu­tion of the concepts of number and space the emergence and applications of calculus, probability theory, non-Euclidean ge­ometries and technology and to the changes in the concept of mathematical rigor. Does not count towards the mathematics requirements of the mathematics major. Open to all students. Prerequisite: MATH 150.

This class fulfills the core curriculum for: Humanities

PHIL 102-3 This course introduces fundamental philosophical issues across a broad spectrum. Problems in metaphysics, epistemology and ethics will be among the areas explored. Emphasis throughout is on developing in the student an appreciation of the nature of philosophical questioning, analyzing and evaluating arguments reflecting on the nature of human existence. 

This class fulfills the core curriculum for: Humanities

PHIL 103A,B-3,3 This course will explore the rise, de­velopment and interaction of the major world civilizations as embodied in ideas and their expressions in religion, philosophy, literature and art. The great traditions of Near Eastern, Eu­ropean, Central Asian, Indian, Chinese and Japanese cultures will be examined. (a) The first semester will cover the early civilization of the Near East, the classical world of Greece and Rome, early China and India. (b) The second semester will look at the integrative civilizations of Buddhism, Medieval Christi­anity and Islam, and Modern Europe. 

This class fulfills the core curriculum for: Humanities

PHIL 104-3 Introduction to con­temporary and perennial problems of personal and social mo­rality, and to methods proposed for their resolution by great thinkers past and present. 

This class fulfills the core curriculum for: Humanities

PHIL 105-3 Study of the traditional and modern methods for evaluating arguments. Applications of logical analysis to practical, scientific and legal reasoning, and to the use of computers. 

This class fulfills the core curriculum for: Humanities

PHIL 303I-3 An interdisciplinary examination of (1) literary and other artistic works which raise philosophic issues and (2) philosophic writ­ings on the relationship between philosophy and literature. Possible topics include: source of and contemporary challenges to the traditional Western idea that literature cannot be or con­tribute to philosophy the role of emotion, imagination and aes­thetic value in philosophic reasoning the role of literature in moral philosophy and philosophic issues of interpretation.

This class fulfills the core curriculum for: Humanities

PHIL 304-3 Ancient Philosophy. (Advanced University Core Curriculum course) (Same as CLAS 304) The birth of Western philosophy in the Greek world, examining such Pre-Socratics as Anaximander, Heraclitus, Pythagoras, and Parmenides focusing upon the flowering of the Athenian period with Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle. The course will conclude with a discussion of the Hellenistic systems of Stoicism, Epicureanism, and the Neo-Platonic mysticism of Plotinus of the Roman period. Fulfills CoLA Writing-Across-the-Curriculum requirement. Satisfies University Core Curriculum Humanities requirement in lieu of 102.

This class fulfills the core curriculum for: Humanities

PHIL 305A-3 Modern Philosophy-Metaphysics and Epistemology. (Advanced University Core Curriculum course) A survey course covering the major figures and themes in the development of modern philosophy up to Kant. Concentration on the Rationalist and Empiricist traditions and the simultaneous development of modern science. Either 305A or 305B fulfills the CoLA Writing-Across-the-Curriculum requirement. 305A or B satisfies the University Core Curriculum Humanities requirement in lieu of 102.

This class fulfills the core curriculum for: Humanities

PHIL 305B-3 Modern Philosophy-Moral and Political Philosophy. (Advanced University Core Curriculum course) A survey course covering the major figures and themes in the development of modern philosophy up to Kant. Concentration on the Rationalist and Empiricist traditions and the simultaneous development of modern science. Either 305A or 305B fulfills the CoLA Writing-Across-the-Curriculum requirement. 305A or B satisfies the University Core Curriculum Humanities requirement in lieu of 102.

This class fulfills the core curriculum for: Humanities

PHIL 307I-3 Interdisciplinary study of major humanistic critiques of tech­nology, science and nature analysis of topics such as ecology, the information revolution, aesthetics and ethics in various branches of science and technology, relation of science to tech­nology.

This class fulfills the core curriculum for: Humanities

PHIL 309I-3 An in­terdisciplinary exploration of classical and modern theories of peace, law, and justice with special attention to their implica­tions for important contemporary political issues. 

This class fulfills the core curriculum for: Humanities

PHIL 334-3 Ethics in Media, Culture and Society. (University Core Curriculum) (Same as JRNL 334)  The purpose of this course is to discuss what it means to act ethically. Does it mean anything more than doing what is right? Are ethics for a lawyer different from a journalist or priest or doctor? How does society decide what is ethical behavior and what is not?

This class fulfills the core curriculum for: Humanities

PHIL 340-3 Ethical Theories. (Advanced University Core Curriculum course) [IAI Course: H4 904] Nature of ethics and morality, ethical skepticism, emotivism, ethical relativism, and representative universalistic ethics. Bentham, Mill, Aristotle, Kant, Blanshard, and Brightman. Satisfies University Core Curriculum Humanities requirement in lieu of 104.

This class fulfills the core curriculum for: Humanities

PHIL 399-3 First Freedoms. (University Core Curriculum) (Same as JRNL 399) The First Amendment protects citizens from the government and sets boundaries of democratic self­government.  The course encompasses free expression in all media-social, broadcast and cinema. It explores tensions between law and ethics, press freedom and privacy, intellectual freedom and equality and liberty and security.

This class fulfills the core curriculum for: Humanities

PSYC 207-3 Peace Psychology-Harmony with Nature and Human Beings. Peace psychology is a broad discipline that addresses human conflict and the need for peace in all arenas of life, including the need to establish harmony between nature and human beings. Key concepts, theories, research, and resolutions pertaining to peace, harmony, competition, and conflict (war, violence) from a variety of disciplines will be reviewed and discussed. Topics will include competition and conflict between different species, individuals, groups, and ethnic/cultural communities in regional, national, and international contexts. Although the theme of peace will be addressed from a psychological perspective, the course is of relevance to many different disciplines.

This class fulfills the core curriculum for: Humanities

SPAN 201A,-3 Intermediate Spanish (University Core Curriculum) Continued development of the four basic language skills. Must be taken in A,B sequence. Prerequisite: A grade of C or better in SPAN 140B or SPAN 175, one year of proficiency credit, or equivalent.

This class fulfills the core curriculum for: Humanities

SPAN 201B-3 Intermediate Spanish. [IAI Course: H1 900] Continued development of the four basic language skills. Must be taken in A,B sequence. Prerequisite: A grade of C- or better in SPAN 201A, or equivalent

This class fulfills the core curriculum for: Humanities

351U 3 to 9 Honors Seminar in Humanities (3 per topic-repeatable for credit) Honors Seminar in Humanities. For University Honors Program Members only. Topics vary and will be announced by the University Honors Program each time the course is offered. These seminars may be used to satisfy the University Core Curriculum requirement for disciplinary studies in humanities


Giant City State Park and the Civilian Conservation Corps : A History in Words and Pictures

Many recognize Giant City State Park as one of the premier recreation spots in southern Illinois, with its unspoiled forests, glorious rock formations, and famous sandstone lodge. But few know the park’s history or are aware of the remarkable men who struggled to build it. Giant City State Park and the Civilian Conservation Corps: A History in Words and Pictures provides the first in-depth portrait of the park’s creation, drawing on rarely seen photos, local and national archival research, and interviews to present an intriguing chapter in Illinois history.

Kay Rippelmeyer traces the geological history of the park, exploring the circumstances that led to the breathtaking scenery for which Giant City is so well known, and providing insightful background on and cultural history of the area surrounding the park. Rippelmeyer then outlines the effects of the Great Depression and the New Deal on southern Illinois, including relief efforts by the Civilian Conservation Corps, which began setting up camps at Giant City in 1933. The men of the CCC, most of them natives of southern and central Illinois, are brought to life through vividly detailed, descriptive prose and hundreds of black-and-white photographs that lavishly illustrate life in the two camps at the park. This fascinating book not only documents the men’s hard work—from the clearing of the first roads and building of stone bridges, park shelters, cabins, and hiking and bridle trails, to quarry work and the raising of the lodge’s famous columns—it also reveals the more personal side of life in the two camps at the park, covering topics ranging from education, sports, and recreation, to camp newspapers, and even misbehavior and discipline.

Supplementing the photographs and narrative are engaging conversations with alumni and family members of the CCC, which give readers a rich oral history of life at Giant City in the 1930s. The book is further enhanced by maps, rosters of enrollees and officers, and a list of CCC camps in southern Illinois. The culmination of three decades of research, Giant City State Park and the Civilian Conservation Corps provides the most intimate history ever of the park and its people, honoring one of Illinois’s most unforgettable places and the men who built it.


Watch the video: SIUC 2021 Spring Commencement. 3:00 PM Session. May 9, 2021