Ann Romney's Speech Auust 28th 2012 - History

Ann Romney's Speech Auust 28th 2012 - History


We are searching data for your request:

Forums and discussions:
Manuals and reference books:
Data from registers:
Wait the end of the search in all databases.
Upon completion, a link will appear to access the found materials.

ROMNEY: Hello! What a welcome.

Thank you. And thank you, Luce. I cannot wait to see what we are going to all do together. This is going to be so exciting!

Just so you all know, the hurricane has hit landfall and I think we should take this moment and recognize that fellow Americans are in its path and just hope and pray that all remain safe and no life is lost and no property is lost. So we should all be thankful for this great country and grateful for our first responders and all that keep us safe in this wonderful country.

Well, I want to talk to you tonight not about politics and not about party. And while there are many important issues that we will hear discussed in this convention and throughout this campaign tonight, I want to talk to you from my heart about our hearts.

I want to talk about not what divides us, but what holds us together as an American family. I want to talk to you tonight about that one great thing that unites us, that one great thing that brings us our greatest joy when times are good and the deepest solace in our dark hours.

Tonight, I want to talk to you about love. I want to talk to you about the deep and abiding love I have for a man I met at a dance many years ago. And the profound love I have and I know we share for this country. I want to talk to you about that love so deep, only a mother can fathom it. The love that we have for our children and our children's children. And I want us to think tonight about the love we share for those Americans, our brothers and our sisters, who are going through difficult times, whose days are never easy, nights are always long, and whose work never seems done. They're here among us tonight in this hall. They are here in neighborhoods across Tampa and all across America. The parents who lie awake at night, side by side, wondering how they will be able to pay the mortgage or make the rent. The single dad who is working extra hours tonight so that his kids can buy some new clothes to go back to school, can take a school trip or play a sport so his kids can feel, you know, just like other kids.

And the working moms who love their jobs, but would like to work just a little less to spend more time with the kids, but that is just out of the question with this economy. Or how about that couple who would like to have another child but wonder how they will afford it? I have been all across this country and I know a lot of you guys. And I have seen and heard stories of how hard it is to get ahead now. You know what? I have heard your voices. They have said to me, I am running in place and we just cannot get ahead. Sometimes, I think that, late at night, if we were all silent for just a few moments and listened carefully, we could hear a collective sigh from the moms and dads across America who made it through another day, and know that they will make it through another one tomorrow. But in the end of that day moment, they are just aren't sure how. And if you listen carefully, you'll hear the women sighing a little bit more than the men. It's how it is, isn't it? It's the moms who have always had to work a little harder to make everything right. It's the mom's of this nation, single, married, widowed, who really hold the country together. We're the mothers. We're the wives. We're the grandmothers. We're the big sisters. We're the little sisters and we are the daughters.

You know it's true, don't you? I love you, women!

And I hear your voices. Those are my favorite fans down there.

You are the ones that have to do a little bit more and you know what it is like to earn a little bit harder earn the respect you deserve at work and then you come home to help with the book report just because it has to be done. You know what those late-night phone calls with an elderly parent are like, and those long weekend drives just to see how they're doing.

You know the fastest route to the local emergency room and which doctors actually answers the phone call when you call at night, and by the way, I know all about that. You know what it is like to sit in that graduation ceremony and wonder how it was that so many long days turned into years that went by so quickly. You are the best of America. You... You are the hope of America. There would not be an America without you. Tonight, we salute you and sing your praises! I am not sure if men really understand this, but I don't think there is a woman in America who really expects her life to be easy. In our own ways, we all know better. You know what, and that's fine. We don't want easy. But the last few years have been harder than they needed to be. It is all the little things, the price of the pump you could not believe and the grocery bills that just get bigger, all those things that used to be free, like school sports are now one more bill to pay. It's all the little things become the big things. And the big things, the good jobs, the chance at college and the home you want to buy just get harder. Everything has become harder. We're too smart and know that there are no easy answers, but we're not dumb enough to accept that there are not better answers.

And that is where this boy I met at a high school dance comes in. His name is Mitt Romney and you should really get to know him. I could tell you why I fell in love with him; he was tall, laughed a lot. He was nervous. Girls like that. It shows the guy's a little intimidated. He was nice to my parents, but he was also really glad when they were not around.

I don't mind that. But more than anything, he made me laugh. Some of you might not know this, but I am the granddaughter of a welsh coal miner. He was determined -- he was determined that his kids get out of the mines. My dad got his first job when he was six years old in a little village in Wales called (inaudible). Cleaning bottles at the (inaudible).

When he was 15, dad came to America. In our country, he saw hope and an opportunity to escape from poverty. He moved to a small town in the great state of Michigan. Michigan!

There he started a business, one he built by himself, by the way.

He raised a family and he became mayor of our town. My dad would often remind my brothers and me how fortunate we were to grow up anyplace like America. He wanted us to have every opportunity that came with life in this country, and so he pushed us to be our best and give our all. Inside the houses that line the streets in downtown, there were a lot of fathers teaching their sons and daughters those same values. I didn't know it at the time, but one of those dads was my future father-in-law, George Romney. Mitt's dad never graduated from college. Instead, he became a carpenter. He worked hard and then he became the head of the car company, and then the governor of Michigan. When Mitt and I met and fell in love, we were determined not to let anything stand in a way of our future. I was Episcopalian, he was a Mormon. We were very young, both still in college. There were many reasons to delay marriage. And you know what, we just didn't care. We got married and moved into a basement apartment.

We walked to class together, shared the housekeeping, ate a lot of pasta and Tuna fish. Our just was a door propped up on saw horses, our dining room table was a fold down ironing board in the kitchen. But those were the best days.

Then our first son came along. All at once, a 22-years-old with a baby and a husband, who's going to business school and law school at the same time, and I can tell you, probably like every other girl who finds herself in a new life far from family and friends with a new baby and a new husband, that it dawned on me that I had absolutely no idea what I was getting into. Well that was 42 years ago. I survived. We now have five sons and 18 beautiful grandchildren.

I am still in love with that boy that I met at a high school dance and he still makes me laugh.

I read somewhere that Mitt and I have a storybook marriage. Well, let me tell you something. In the storybooks I read, there never were long, long rainy winter afternoons in a house with five boys screaming at once, and those storybooks never seemed to have chapter's called M. S. or breast cancer. A storybook marriage? Nope, not at all. What Mitt Romney and I have is a real marriage. I know this good and decent man for what he is. He's warm, and loving, and patient. He has tried to live his life with a set of values centered on family, faith, and love of one fellow man. From the time we were first married, I have seen him spend countless hours helping others. I've seen him drop everything to help a friend in trouble, and been there when late-night calls of panic come from a member of our church whose child has been taken to the hospital.

You may not agree on Mitt's decisions on issues or his politics -- by the way Massachusetts is only 13 percent Republican, so it's not like it's a shock to me. But -- but let me say this to every American who is thinking about who should be our next president. No one will work harder. No one will care more. And no one will move heaven and earth like Mitt Romney to make this country a better place to live.

It's true -- it's true that Mitt's been successful at each new challenge he has taken on. You know what, it actually amazes me to see his history of success being attacked. Are those really the values that made our country great? (AUDIENCE MEMBER): No.

As a mom of five boys, do we want to to raise our children to be afraid of success?

Do we send our children out in the world with the advice try to do OK?

And let's be honest. If the last four years had been more successful, do we really think there would be this attack on Mitt Romney's success?

Of course not. Mitt would be the first to tell you that he is the most fortunate man in the world. He had two loving parents who gave him strong values and taught him the value of work. He had the chance to get the education his father never had. But, as his partner on this amazing journey, I can tell you Mitt Romney was not handed success. He built it. He stayed in Massachusetts after graduate school and got a job. I saw the long hours that started with that first job. I was there when he had a small group of friends talking about starting a new company. I was there when they struggled and wondered if the whole idea was just not going to work. Mitt's reaction was to work harder and press on.

Today, the company has become another great American success story. Has it made those who started the company successful made them successful beyond their dreams? Yes, it has. It allowed us to give our sons a chance at good educations and made those long hours of the reports and homework worth every minute. It's given us the deep satisfaction of being able to help others in ways that we could never have imagined. This is important. I want you to hear what I am going to say. Mitt does not like to talk about how he has helped others because he sees it as a privilege, not a political talking point.

We are no different than the millions of Americans who quietly help their neighbors, their churches and their communities. They don't do it so that others will think more of them. They do it because there is no greater joy. Give and it shall be given unto you.

But because this is America, that small company which grew has helped so many lead better lives, the jobs that grew from the risk they took have become college educations and first homes. That success has helped scholarships, pensions and retirement funds. This is the genius of America. Dreams fulfilled, help others launch new dreams.

At every turn in his life, this man that I met at a high school dance has helped lift up others. He did it with the Olympics when many wanted to give up. He did it in Massachusetts where he guided the state from economic crisis to unemployment at just 4.7 percent. Under Mitt, Massachusetts' school for the best in the nation. The best. He started something that I really love. He started the John and Abigail Adams scholarship which gives the top 25 percent of high- school graduates a four-year tuition-free scholarship. This is the man America needs.

This is a man who will wake up every day with the determination to solve the problems that others say cannot be solved, to fix what others say is beyond repair, this is the man who will work harder than anyone so that we can work a little less hard.

I can't tell you what will happen over the next four years. But I can only stand here tonight as a wife and a mother and a grandmother, an American, and make you this solemn commitment. This man will not fail.


Ann Romney Tells Women Her Husband 'Will Not Let Us Down'

Ann Romney makes blunt appeal to American women on husband's behalf.

Ann Romney's Best Moments: 'I Love You Women!'

TAMPA, Aug. 28, 2012 -- Ann Romney, the wife of the Republican presidential nominee, told Americans tonight that they could trust her husband and in a blunt appeal to women said, "This man will not let us down."

"Sometimes I think that late at night, if we were all silent for just a few moments and listened carefully, we could hear a great collective sigh from the moms and dads across America," Mrs. Romney said. "And if you listen carefully, you'll hear the women sighing a little bit more than the men."

"It's the moms of this nation -- single, married, widowed -- who really hold this country together," she said, moments before looking out to the convention floor and crying, "I love you women!"

Speaking about her husband, she promised, "He will take us to a better place, just as he took me home safely from that dance" where they first met more than four decades ago.

"This man will not fail," Ann Romney said. "This man will not let us down."

Mrs. Romney threw some sharp elbows, too, making a case against the criticism her husband has faced over his time in the private sector with Bain Capital, a private equity firm.

"It's true that Mitt has been successful at each new challenge he has taken on. It amazes me to see his history of success actually being attacked. Are those really the values that made our country great?

"And let's be honest," she continued, "If the last four years had been more successful, do we really think there would be this attack on Mitt Romney's success? Of course not."

As the Romney's five sons watched their mother, several clearly had tears in their eyes.

Mrs. Romney spoke at length about her life with the man she married at the age of 19, a man she said people did not truly understand.

"I read somewhere that Mitt and I have a 'storybook marriage.' Well, in the storybooks I read, there were never long, long, rainy winter afternoons in a house with five boys screaming at once. And those storybooks never seemed to have chapters called MS or breast cancer," she said referring to ailments she has survived. "A storybook marriage? No, not at all. What Mitt Romney and I have is a real marriage."

After finishing her address, Mrs. Romney was greeted on the stage by the candidate. They waived to the crowd, before joining their sons to watch New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie's keynote speech.

Mrs. Romney's speech was meant to offer a unique insight into her husband's life and personality, a take voters may not be familiar with -- especially those who have yet to make a decision between him and President Obama. The campaign had hoped Mrs. Romney would be, as they like to say, their "secret weapon," their best bet at painting a more flesh-toned and flattering portrait of the candidate before Election day.

Hours before taking the stage, Mrs. Romney told ABC News' Diane Sawyer that she was nervous.

"You know, I was a little shaky when I first came out. I'm like, oh, this is a pretty big auditorium, this will obviously be the biggest speech of my life. But as soon as I settled in I'm like I felt good, felt really good," Mrs. Romney said.

Asked if her husband had any advice for her, Mrs. Romney said that he advised her to "just look as though someone's face is there, as though you are talking to someone."


On This Day in History, 28 август

The historic speech that was a call to end racism in the United States was given in front of the Lincoln Memorial during the March on Washington, a political rally organized by human and political rights groups. Over 200,000 people gathered in Washington DC to demand jobs and equality for African-Americans. The I Have a Dream speech by Dr. King became a symbol of the American civil rights movement and is one of the most recognizable speeches in recorded history.

1963 Evergreen Bridge Opens for Traffic for the First Time

The longest floating bridge in the world, the Evergreen Point Bridge or the Governor Albert D. Rosellini Bridge, is on Route 520 in the state of Washington. It is built on Lake Washington and connects Seattle with the city of Medina. The bridge is 4,750 meters long, half of which is over the water.

1955 Emmett Till is Murdered in Mississippi

The 14-year old African-American boy was brutally killed by white men after he was allegedly reported to have flirted with a white woman a day before. Till, who was from Chicago, was visiting family in Money, Mississippi, when he was kidnapped, mutilated, and his body dumped into the river.

1937 Toyota Motor Corporation is Formed

The car company was first founded in 1933 as a subsidiary of the Toyoda Automatic Loom Works, Ltd. The division was headed by Kiichiro Toyoda, the son of the Toyota founder, Sakichi Toyoda.

1845 First Issue of Scientific American hits the newsstands

The science magazine was founded by American inventor and artist Rufus M. Porter. The magazine began as a weekly newsletter and is now the oldest continuously published magazine in the United States.


Contents

Site selection Edit

On August 14, 2009, the Republican National Committee named an eight-member Site Selection Committee to start the process of selecting a host city for the 2012 convention. [6] News reports in early 2010 indicated that Tampa, as well as Salt Lake City, Utah and Phoenix, Arizona, had been selected as finalist candidates for the convention site. [4] [7] [8] The decision was announced on May 12, 2010, when Tampa was selected as the host city. [9]

Host Committee Edit

The 2012 Tampa Bay Host Committee, a 501(c)(3) non-profit, was the official and federally designated presidential convention host committee for the convention, charged with the task of raising the necessary funds to hold the convention. [10] The Host Committee was composed of 10 prominent Florida business executives, civic leaders, and other community leaders. Al Austin was chairman and Ken Jones served as the president and chief executive officer. [11] [12] The Host Committee achieved its fundraising goal as of August 27, 2012, having raised more than $55,000,000 to host the 2012 Republican National Convention.

Objectives and themes Edit

The convention theme was "A Better Future". [13] Each day also had its own theme: Monday's was "We Can Do Better" Tuesday's was "We Built It" Wednesday's was "We Can Change It" and Thursday's was "We Believe in America." In addition to these daily themes, the Republican National Committee announced that it would present a series of policy workshops to be hosted by former Speaker of the House Newt Gingrich called "Newt University". [14] A primary objective of the convention, described both as Romney's "biggest election hurdle" and as Romney's "most urgent task" of concern by top Republicans, was to counter efforts to portray him as an out-of-touch elitist and to rehabilitate the image of his business career. [15] The convention lasted from August 27–30, 2012. According to the convention website, it hosted 2,286 delegates, 2,125 alternates and 15,000 credentialed members of the media. The convention CEO was William D. Harris. [16] Several notable Republican figures chose not to attend the convention, including former presidents George W. Bush and George H. W. Bush, and former vice-president Dick Cheney. However, a video tribute to George W. Bush, who has stayed out of the political arena since leaving office three years earlier, was shown at the convention on Wednesday night, in which Bush's family members praised him. In the tribute, Bush's father, George H.W. Bush, said of George W. Bush: "There was never a taint of scandal around his presidency. And I think we forget the importance of that." [17]

Security Edit

The convention was designated as a National Special Security Event, which meant that ultimate authority over law enforcement went to the Secret Service and Department of Homeland Security. [18] The federal government provided $50 million for Convention security. [19] Much of the money went to deputizing additional police. Other expenses included expanded surveillance technology and an armored SWAT vehicle. [20] [21] Tampa Bay disclosed specifically that it had spent $1.18 M on video linkages between ground police and helicopters. [22] [23] [24] The city paid $16,500 to the Florida State Fairgrounds Authority in exchange for police use of local fairgrounds as a command center. [25]

Dani Doane of the Heritage Foundation described the police presence as "unnerving" and "like a police state". [26] [27] Others reported a quiet week with small protests and few arrests. [28] [29] Police handed out bottles of water during the event [30] and at one point served protestors a box lunch. [31]

Platform Edit

A committee, chaired by Virginia Governor Bob McDonnell, met in Tampa to draft a party platform. On August 21, 2012, the committee released a 60-page document for approval at the convention. The platform was enthusiastically approved at the convention on August 28. [32] [33] Policies include: [34]

  • A Human Life Amendment banning abortion (with exceptions, if any, to be determined by Congress) [35] and legislation "to make clear that the Fourteenth Amendment's protections apply to unborn children." [36]
  • A constitutional amendment defining marriage as the union of one man and one woman. The right of the federal government and each state to deny legal recognition to same-sex marriages. [32]
  • For Medicare: increase the age of eligibility and a shift to a defined contribution plan in which the government pays a fixed amount rather than cover an individual's costs. [37]
  • A new "guest worker" program [38] long-term detention for "dangerous but undeportable aliens". [39]
  • Abstinence should be the only form of family planning for teenagers that is government funded. [37]
  • Increased transparency of the Federal Reserve via audits and investigating the viability of returning to a fixed value currency. [40]
  • Ending the federal income tax by repealing the Sixteenth Amendment if the current taxation system is significantly changed. [41]
  • Opposing regulations on business to curb climate change, curtailing the power of the Environmental Protection Agency, and promoting "private stewardship of the environment". [42]

Nominations Edit

According to Fox News [43] and Associated Press delegate projections, [44] Mitt Romney, former Governor of Massachusetts, clinched the Republican presidential nomination in the Texas primary on May 29, 2012 and became the party's presumptive nominee. [45] Two weeks before the convention, on August 11, Romney announced Paul Ryan as his running mate. [46] The decision made Ryan the first major party vice presidential candidate from Wisconsin. [47]

Rick Santorum and Newt Gingrich formally released their delegates in the week before the convention and encouraged them to vote for Romney. Ron Paul retained his delegates, as part of an overall strategy to influence the party. The final composition of several delegations was subject to ruling of the Committee on Contests.

The traditional roll call of the states, which permits delegates to promote their home states, took place on Tuesday, August 28, 2012, the first full day of the convention.

Paul Ryan was nominated for vice president by voice vote.

Speakers Edit

The original plan called for speeches on Monday, but due to Tropical Storm Isaac most of the Monday program was cancelled and all the main speakers were rescheduled to speak later at the convention. [48] [49]

Ron Paul was offered a speech slot, under the conditions that the Romney campaign could pre-review his remarks and that he would fully endorse Romney. [50] Paul declined the offer, saying that he remained an "undecided voter". [51] Paul explained that "It wouldn't be my speech. That would undo everything I've done in the last 30 years. I don't fully endorse him for president." [50] Instead, a tribute video to Paul was shown at the convention. [52]

Congresswoman Cathy McMorris Rodgers served as the official convention host, speaking at the start of each night of the convention to provide the theme of the speeches for each evening. [53]

The most coveted speaking slot that was intended to close the Monday night program of the convention was scheduled to go to Ann Romney, Mitt Romney's wife. But since the major television networks had opted out on Monday's primetime coverage (prior to Monday's cancellation of activities), her speech was moved to Tuesday, August 28 after 10:00 pm EDT, when broadcast networks began coverage, with an introduction by Lucé Vela Fortuño, the First Lady of Puerto Rico. [54] Ann Romney's task in her speech was described by Lois Romano of Politico as "to try to accomplish what the sharpest minds in Republican politics have failed to do: present her stiff and awkward husband as a likable guy." [55]

Other August 28 speakers included Governors John Kasich (Ohio), Nikki Haley (South Carolina), Bob McDonnell (Virginia), and Mary Fallin (Oklahoma). [56]

Monday, August 27 Edit

Due to Tropical Storm Isaac, the scheduled activities on Monday were postponed or canceled RNC Chairman Reince Priebus called the convention to order at 2:00 pm on Monday and started a debt clock in the arena, before putting the convention into recess at 2:10 pm. [57]

Tuesday, August 28 - Ann Romney and Chris Christie Edit

On Tuesday afternoon, the bulk of the Maine delegates walked out of the convention in protest of the decision to replace 10 Ron Paul delegates with 10 Romney delegates. [58] This action by the RNC came in response [ failed verification ] to a takeover of Maine's Republican State Convention by Paul supporters which resulted in Paul's percentage of delegates being doubled over the percentage of delegates to which he would have been entitled by the caucus vote count [ failed verification ] the additional ten delegates came at the expense of Romney. [59]

Originally scheduled to speak at the closing of Monday night's program, Ann Romney spoke in front of the Republican National Convention on Tuesday, August 28, 2012. Romney started off by stating that her speech was not about politics or party, but about love. She spoke about her husband, Mitt Romney, in an attempt to present her husband as likeable and relatable, responding in part to his opponents' depiction of him as an out-of-touch elitist. [60]

-Ann Romney's 2012 RNC convention speech

The speakers for the day were:

    , associate rabbi of New York City's Congregation Kehilath Jeshurun and director of Yeshiva University's Straus Center for Torah and Western Thought , co-chairwoman of the Republican National Committee. , Democratic Mayor of Tampa.
  • William Harris, CEO of the Republican National Convention.
  • Al Austin, Chairman of the Tampa Bay Host Committee. , United States Representative for Texas's 32nd congressional district
  • Ricky Gill, Republican candidate for US Representative for California's 9th congressional district. , United States Representative for Texas's 23rd congressional district.
  • Andy Barr, Republican candidate for US Representative for Kentucky's 6th congressional district. , member of the North Carolina Senate for the 12th district and Republican candidate for US Representative for North Carolina's 7th congressional district. , Republican candidate for US Representative for North Carolina's 8th congressional district. , Republican candidate for US Representative for North Carolina's 11th congressional district. , United States Representative for Michigan's 1st congressional district.
  • John Archer, Republican candidate for US Representative for Iowa's 2nd congressional district. , former Republican member of the Indiana House of Representatives for the 21st district and Republican candidate for US Representative for Indiana's 2nd congressional district. , Republican candidate for US Representative for Montana's At-large congressional district. , United States Representative for Utah's 3rd congressional district. , United States Representative for South Carolina's 1st congressional district. , United States Representative for Wisconsin's 7th congressional district. , Republican candidate for US Representative for Pennsylvania's 4th congressional district. , United States Representative for Arkansas's 2nd congressional district. , member of the Nebraska Legislature for the 43rd district and Republican candidate for US Senate from Nebraska. , United States Representative for North Dakota's At-large congressional district and Republican candidate for US Senate from North Dakota. , member of the Virginia House of Delegates for the 34th district.
  • Rae Lynn Chornenky, president of the National Federation of Republican Women.
  • Alex Schriver, National Chairman of the College Republican National Committee. , Republican Mayor of Oklahoma City.
  • Chris Fussner, Global Chair of Republicans Abroad and CEO of TransTechnology.
  • Lisa Stickan, Chairperson of the Young Republicans. , United States Senator from North Dakota. , United States Representative for Tennessee's 7th congressional district. , Speaker of the United States House of Representatives. , Chairman of the Republican National Committee. , Mayor of Saratoga Springs, Utah and Republican candidate for US Representative for Utah's 4th congressional district. , actress and Tea Party activist. , candidate for Lt. Governor of Delaware. Switched places with Rick Santorum in comparison to the published order of speakers. , United States Representative for Washington's 5th congressional district. , U.S. Senator from New Hampshire, accompanied by Jack Gilchrist, owner of Gilchrist Metal Fabricating. , Governor of Ohio. , Governor of Oklahoma. , Governor of Virginia, accompanied by Bev Gray. , Governor of Wisconsin. , Governor of Nevada.
  • Phil Archuletta, New Mexico businessman. , former U.S. Senator from Pennsylvania and 2012 Presidential candidate. , former Texas solicitor general and 2012 Republican nominee from Texas for U.S. Senate. , former Democratic United States Representative for Alabama's 7th congressional district and 2010 Democratic candidate for Governor of Alabama. , Governor of South Carolina. , First Lady of Puerto Rico. , former First Lady of Massachusetts & wife of Republican nominee Mitt Romney. , Governor of New Jersey - keynote speaker. [5]

Wednesday, August 29 - Paul Ryan Edit

Wednesday saw a speech from vice presidential nominee Paul Ryan. [61] The accuracy of some of Ryan's statements was widely challenged by the media, fact-checkers, and political opponents. [62] [63] The Associated Press criticized Ryan for taking "factual shortcuts", [64] and the speech was criticized in other outlets for being "misleading" [65] [66] and "dishonest". [67] [68] The most widely challenged portion of Ryan's speech occurred when Ryan criticized Obama for supposedly claiming, at a 2008 campaign appearance at a GM plant in Janesville, Wisconsin (which was slated for closure), that he (Obama) would keep that plant open if he became president. [69] GM began a phased plant closing for the Janesville facility during the 2008 presidential campaign, laying off nearly all of its 1,200 workers on December 23, 2008. 57 workers remained employed at the plant during final assembly and another 40 to 50 in the decommissioning of the plant. [70] [71] On September 19, 2011, GM reported that the Janesville plant was on standby status, as part of a contract between itself and the UAW. [72]

The speakers for the day were:

    , Republican Minority Leader of the Senate. , United States Senator from Kentucky. , Salt Lake City Gold Olympian alpine ski racer, and Jeanine McDonnell , U.S. Senator from Arizona and 2008 presidential nominee. , Attorney General of Florida, and Sam Olens, Attorney General of Georgia. , Governor of Louisiana. (Cancelled due to Tropical Storm / Hurricane Isaac) , U.S. Senator from South Dakota.
  • Yash Wadhwa, Wisconsin civil engineer.
  • Tad True, vice president of a pipeline company in Wyoming.
  • Michelle Voorheis, Michigan businesswoman. , U.S. Senator from Ohio.
  • Steve Cohen, CEO of Screen Machine Industries in Ohio. , Governor of Puerto Rico. , former Governor of Minnesota and 2012 presidential candidate. , former Governor of Arkansas and 2008 presidential candidate. , former U.S. Secretary of State. , Governor of New Mexico. , U.S. Representative from Wisconsin and nominee for Vice President of the United States. [5]

Thursday, August 30: Eastwood, Rubio and Romney Edit

Actor and director Clint Eastwood made a planned surprise appearance at the convention, speaking at the top of the final hour. He spent much of his speech time on a largely improvised routine addressing an empty chair representing President Obama. In at least two instances, Eastwood implied the President had uttered profanities directed both at Romney and Eastwood. [73] Eastwood's remarks were well-received within the convention hall, but responses were mixed in the media. [74] Film critic Roger Ebert commented "Clint, my hero, is coming across as sad and pathetic. He didn't need to do this to himself. It's unworthy of him". [75] Comedian Bob Newhart, who had popularized empty-chair interviews in the 1960s, tweeted in his deadpan humor style, "I heard that Clint Eastwood was channeling me at the RNC. My lawyers and I are drafting our lawsuit". [76]

Thursday night concluded with Romney's acceptance speech. He announced that if elected, a Romney administration energy policy would take "full advantage of our oil and coal and gas and nuclear and renewables". [77] Romney also joked about the Obama administration's policies on climate change, saying "President Obama promised to begin to slow the rise of the oceans and heal the planet", a line which elicited laughter from the convention audience. [78] By way of contrast, Romney continued "MY promise. is to help you and your family."

Thursday's speakers included:

    , United States Representative from Florida's 14th congressional district and 2012 Republican nominee from Florida for U.S. Senate. , former Republican Speaker of the House and 2012 Presidential candidate & his wife, Callista Gingrich.
  • Craig Romney, son of Mitt Romney. , former Governor of Florida accompanied by teacher Sean Duffy and former student Frantz Placide. , United States Representative for Washington's 5th congressional district.
  • Grant Bennett, CEO of CPS Technologies and former consultant of Bain Capital.
  • Ted and Pat Oparowsky and Pam Finlayson from Mitt Romney's former congregation , chairman of Romney for President campaign. , founder of Staples Inc.
  • Ray Fernandez, owner of Vida Pharmacy , former Lt. Governor of Massachusetts.
  • Jane Edmonds, former Massachusetts Secretary of Workforce. , actor he was confirmed to be the "mystery speaker" that had been subject of media speculation since the opening day of the convention. [79] , United States Senator from Florida. , former Governor of Massachusetts and nominee for President of the United States. [5]

Invocations and blessings Edit

Besides Rabbi Soloveichik, another five religious leaders were scheduled to provide blessings or invocations, including the Rev. Sammy Rodriguez, president of the National Hispanic Christian Leadership Conference Ishwar Singh of the Sikh Society of Central Florida Archbishop Demetrios, primate of the Greek Orthodox Archdiocese of America Ken and Priscilla Hutchins of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (to open [80] ) and Roman Catholic Archbishop of New York Timothy Dolan. [81] Dolan gave the closing prayer.

In October 2011, Tampa city officials began planning for anticipated protests, and discussions centered around small prior protests by the Occupy movement. According to former Tampa City Council member John Dingfelder, then the senior staff attorney for the mid-Florida office of the American Civil Liberties Union, the convention should expect to draw far more protestors and the city should plan on up to 10,000. Dingfelder encouraged the city to be proactive regarding where protests could occur and protestors could sleep. Tampa's Mayor Bob Buckhorn's response was "If they want a place to sleep, they can go home or to a hotel. Just because they want to occupy something doesn't mean we are obligated to provide them with an opportunity to camp out in a public park or on a sidewalk." [82]

The city of Tampa has banned puppets from downtown during the convention, a decision which some puppet-makers say violates their civil liberties. Police claimed that puppets could be used to conceal weapons—at the 2000 RNC, police charged a group of puppet-makers in Philadelphia with conspiracy to resist arrest. [83]

On August 4, the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) held a forum addressing what would be considered free speech during the Convention. [84] [85]

In early August, the city announced plans to provide delegates and protestors alike with water and portable toilets. [86]

Various groups began demonstrating on July 27 in Tampa and Tallahassee as part of a one-month countdown to the convention, calling for "good jobs, healthcare, affordable education, equality and peace." [87]


Fact-Checking Ann and Mitt Romney's Hardknock Early Years

If you didn't know much about Mitt and Ann Romney's biography, you might have gotten the impression from Ann's speech at the Republican National Convention Tuesday night that they were once two crazy kids in love just scraping by in a sad little slum.

If you didn't know much about Mitt and Ann Romney's biography, you might have gotten the impression from Ann's speech at the Republican National Convention Tuesday night that they were once two crazy kids in love just scraping by in a sad little slum. There's no doubt the Romneys were very much in love, but their youthful real estate experience wasn't typical of impoverished college students, or even middle class ones. They lived off stock options.

Like Ann Romney, Chris Christie talked about his hardscrabble early years, when he and his wife moved into a "studio apartment," as if it's the norm of a young married couple to move into a suburban McMansion straight out of college. Let's go through the lines of Ann Romney's speech to see where the cute-poverty rhetoric doesn't quite match up with history:

Their first apartment

Ann Romney Tuesday: "We got married and moved into a basement apartment. We walked to class together, shared the housekeeping, and ate a lot of pasta and tuna fish."

Ann Romney in 1994: When Mitt Romney was running for Senate in 1994, his wife gave a candid interview with Jack Thomas of The Boston Globe, published October 20, 1994. She told Thomas that after their Hawaii honeymoon, Mitt transferred to Brigham Young University. Back then, she still thought of that time as tough. But she wasn't as good at describing it, suggesting that it was rough living off stock options:

"They were not easy years. You have to understand, I was raised in a lovely neighborhood, as was Mitt, and at BYU, we moved into a $62-a-month basement apartment with a cement floor and lived there two years as students with no income. Neither one of us had a job, because Mitt had enough of an investment from stock that we could sell off a little at a time."

Furnishings

Ann Romney 2012: "Our desk was a door propped up on sawhorses. Our dining room table was a fold down ironing board in the kitchen. Those were very special days. Then our first son came along."

Ann Romney 1994: "We had our first child in that tiny apartment. We couldn't afford a desk, so we used a door propped on sawhorses in our bedroom. It was a big door, so we could study on it together. The funny thing is that I never expected help." [Most college students would consider investment income help, right?]

Whether Mitt was 'handed success'

Ann Romney 2012: "Mitt will be the first to tell you that he is the most fortunate man in the world. He had two loving parents who gave him strong values and taught him the value of work. He had the chance to get the education his father never had. But as his partner on this amazing journey, I can tell you Mitt Romney was not handed success."

Ann Romney 1994: "Remember, we'd been paying $ 62 a month rent, but here, rents were $ 400, and for a dump. This is when we took the now-famous loan that Mitt talks about from his father and bought a $42,000 home in Belmont, and you know? The mortgage payment was less than rent. Mitt saw that the Boston market was behind Chicago, LA and New York. We stayed there seven years and sold it for $90,000, so we not only stayed for free, we made money. As I said, Mitt's very bright.

"Another son came along 18 months later, although we waited four years to have the third, because Mitt was still in school and we had no income except the stock we were chipping away at. We were living on the edge, not entertaining. No, I did not work. Mitt thought it was important for me to stay home with the children, and I was delighted."

The risk at the start of Mitt's career

Ann Romney 2012: "I saw the long hours that started with that first job. I was there when he and a small group of friends talked about starting a new company. I was there when they struggled and wondered if the whole idea just wasn't going to work. Mitt's reaction was to work harder and press on."

The Real Romney, by Michael Kranish and Scott Helman: At Bain & Company, founder Bill Bain treated Romney "as a kind of prince regent at the firm, a favored son." He selected Romney to start and run Bain Capital. "It would be Romney’s first chance to run his own firm and, potentially, to make a killing," they write. "It was an offer few young men in a hurry could refuse. Yet Romney stunned his boss by doing just that." They continue:

He explained to Bain that he didn’t want to risk his position, earnings, and reputation on an experiment. He found the offer appealing but didn’t want to make the decision in a “light or flippant manner.” So Bain sweetened the pot. He guaranteed that if the experiment failed Romney would get his old job and salary back, plus any raises he would have earned during his absence. Still, Romney worried about the impact on his reputation if he proved unable to do the job. Again the pot was sweetened. Bain promised that, if necessary, he would craft a cover story saying that Romney’s return to Bain & Company was needed due to his value as a consultant. “So,” Bain explained, “there was no professional or financial risk.” This time Romney said yes.


Accuracy in Media

Chris Matthews, who has been on a rampage this week in trying to label the Republican Party as racist, switched gears last night after Ann Romney’s speech at the Republican National Convention and used the opportunity to attack Mitt Romney directly.

Matthews complimented Ann Romney for a speech that he said was personal and made her look good, and then turned his attention to Mitt Romney’s appearance on the stage at the end of her speech.

But then he came out at the end, and he almost looked like he came out on wheels And he almost looked like he came out on wheels, like he’s not real. That person who came out there like that, almost a statue of a person. His odd animation — his odd lack of animation. The way he moved in the room at the end was strange. She’s a real person trying to advertise him as a real person. But she really advertised a Mr.-Fix-It.

Matthews continued with his attack by referencing Romney’s wealth and calling him a “conehead” who doesn’t quite seem like an Earthling, adding that Ann Romney had to make Mitt seem like a real human being and not a “wooden like-figure.”

I’m not really sure how Romney was supposed to look last night in that very brief appearance. He kissed his wife and waved to the crowd, before departing with her, hand in hand.

Apparently that wasn’t sufficiently human for Matthews.

Don Irvine

Don Irvine serves as the Publisher for Accuracy in Media. He is active on Facebook and Twitter. You can follow him @donirvine to read his latest thoughts. View the complete archives from Don Irvine.

Ready to fight back against media bias?
Join us by donating to AIM today.


Ann Romney needles convention planners, promises "heartfelt" speech

Ann Romney, wife of Republican presidential candidate, former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney hands out cookies during a flight to Tampa, Tuesday, Aug. 28, 2012. AP Photo/Evan Vucci

(CBS News) TAMPA, Fla. - A spirited Ann Romney arrived in Tampa late Tuesday morning, expressing excitement at her opportunity to introduce her husband to millions of Americans - and humorous surprise at adviser Stuart Stevens and other planners over their strong interest over what she'll wear for her convention speech.

"Frankly, I didn't realize that Stuart had to weigh in on this - or my husband," she told reporters on a charter flight from Bedford, Mass., to Tampa. "It was going to be like my wedding night I wasn't going to let him know what I was going to wear. But now they have opinions."

Offering a glimpse at the message she hopes to portray in her speech, Ann Romney said it will be "heartfelt." She said she hopes voters will consider "how important this election's going to be, and how important it's going to be for them to consider the right things to make their right decisions."

She frequently introduces her husband on the campaign trail. But tonight she will use a teleprompter to deliver her remarks, something she acknowledged not being entirely comfortable with.

Republican Convention 2012

"This is a unique experience for me, to actually have something written because I've never used it," she told reporters. "No one has ever written a speech for me, no one has ever, I've never given anything off a sheet . so I had a lot of input in this, I must say. And a lot of tweaking where I felt like I was getting what I really wanted to say from my heart."

The presumed Republican nominee and his wife both spent the past two days practicing their speeches at a New Hampshire prep school. Ann Romney joked that she had practiced her speech enough recently that it had been "reduced to a tweet," and so decided to take time to do something she loves - baking.

"These are my grandmother's recipe, Welsh cakes," she explained as she passed a red tin of the round pastries among the press corps. "The funniest thing is my one grandmother was a great cook, the Welsh grandmother was a terrible cook, and I never liked her Welsh cakes growing up and I've learned how to make them in such a way that they're much more moist and delicious."

First published on August 28, 2012 / 3:55 PM

© 2012 CBS Interactive Inc. All Rights Reserved.

Sarah Huisenga is covering the Mitt Romney campaign for CBS News and National Journal.


August 28, 2012

Partially reflected in a glass shelf, journalists cover a news conference of members of Syrian opposition groups presenting the program &lsquoThe Day After: Supporting a Democratic Transition in Syria&rsquo, in Berlin, Germany. (AP)

A chapter of the layered geological history of Mars is laid bare in this postcard from NASA&rsquos Curiosity rover. The image shows the base of Mount Sharp, the rover&rsquos eventual science destination. This image is a portion of a larger image taken by Curiosity&rsquos 100-millimeter Mast Camera on Aug. 23, 2012. (NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS)

An Albanian boy uses a branch in an effort to put out a blaze raging near the city of Memaliaj. Albania has battled multiple forest fires since June after several heat waves and months of drought. (AFP)

Many residents leave the New Orleans area in anticipation of tropical storm Isaac, which is expected to make landfall on the Louisiana coast as a hurricane in Kenner, Louisiana. (AP)

A clown performs during a media preview of &lsquoSlava&rsquos Snowshow&rsquo at the Marina Bay Sands in Singapore. The show was created by renowned Russian clown Slava Polunin in 1993. (AP)

A Chinese fisherman is rescued by South Korean coast guard officers, unseen, from a Chinese ship in Jeju, South Korea. A powerful typhoon pounded South Korea with strong winds and heavy rain. (AP)

A Gulf Air jet arrives over the top of houses to land at Heathrow Airport in west London. Britain&rsquos transport minister said she would probably resign if the government gave in to pressure to expand London&rsquos Heathrow airport. (Reuters)

Afghan locals gather at the site of a bomb blast in Kandahar province. The chief of police in Kandahar province survived the insurgent truck-bomb attack that killed four civilians, a spokeswoman for NATO-led forces and Afghan officials. (Reuters)

Republican vice presidential candidate, Rep. Paul Ryan, center, R-Wis., works on the speech he will deliver at the Republican National Convention, with senior adviser Dan Senor, left, and senior aid Conor Sweeney during the campaign charter flight from Wisconsin to Tampa, Florida. (AP)


Ann Romney’s speech will evoke her heart and family ties

TAMPA, Fla. -- As expected, the speech that Ann Romney is to deliver this evening is heavy on appeal to emotion, based on her role as Mitt Romney’s wife, the mother of his five sons and the grandmother to his 18 grandchildren.

In an excerpt released by the Romney campaign several hours before she was to take the stage around 10 p.m. EDT on the first full day of the Republican National Convention, the aspiring first lady invoked her family, their strong bonds and her husband’s generosity of spirit.

“Tonight I want to talk to you from my heart about our hearts,” the 63-year-old wife of the Republican nominee will say. “I want to talk not about what divides us, but what holds us together as an American family. I want to talk to you tonight about that one great thing that unites us, that one thing that brings us our greatest joy when times are good, and the deepest solace in our dark hours. Tonight I want to talk to you about love.”

Her speech contains a paean to her father-in-law, George Romney, to whom she grew close when he helped oversee her conversion to Mormonism at a time when her future husband was away, first at college, then on his two-year mission to France: “Mitt’s dad never graduated from college. Instead, he became a carpenter. He worked hard, and he became the head of a car company, and then the governor of Michigan.”

The Romneys, who have been married 43 years, have often been described as having a strong marriage, but Ann Romney will seek to correct misperceptions as she alludes to some of her well-known health struggles: “I read somewhere that Mitt and I have a ‘storybook marriage.’ Well, in the storybooks I read, there were never long, long, rainy winter afternoons in a house with five boys screaming at once. And those storybooks never seemed to have chapters called MS or breast cancer. A storybook marriage? No, not at all. What Mitt Romney and I have is a real marriage.”

People often say that Ann Romney is her husband’s best character witness. This evening, her speech will seek to convey the sense that Mitt Romney has spent a lifetime helping others.

“At every turn in his life, this man I met at a high school dance has helped lift up others,” she will say. “He did it with the Olympics, when many wanted to give up.”

Ann Romney, who said earlier today she was nervous about using a prompter for the first time, will close with an appeal to voters: “This is the man America needs. This is the man who will wake up every day with the determination to solve the problems that others say can’t be solved, to fix what others say is beyond repair. This is the man who will work harder than anyone so that we can work a little less hard.

“I can’t tell you what will happen over the next four years. But I can only stand here tonight, as a wife, a mother, a grandmother, an American, and make you this solemn commitment: This man will not fail.


Ann Romney’s Love Story

Ann Romney told the Republican National Convention that she had come to talk about love—“from my heart, about our hearts.” She had been sent to make people love her husband, or to like him, or at least to “humanize” him. Love is useful that way it is, as she said, a force that “unites us,” a passion, in some hands, that can turn into a broad embrace. And yet, she insisted more on modesty, restraint, and a certain measure of defiance. “This is important. I want you to hear what I am going to say. Mitt doesn’t like to talk about how he helps others, because he see it as a privilege, not as a political talking point.” What kind of political love affair is this?

When Ann entered, dressed in red, the frames on the convention stage filled up with pictures of her as a teen-ager and a young mother. For most of the speech, the pictures never showed her getting much older than that: there were her children, as babies or as preschoolers there she was, in a Peter Pan collar. Neither, rhetorically, did her husband age much. She said that for her he was still “that boy I met at a high-school dance,” and her memories seemed to get vaguer as Mitt got older: she talked about the business he started, but not what kind of business it was. She also mentioned, several times, how he made her laugh. (No examples were forthcoming.) “You can trust Mitt,” she said. “He will take us to a better place, just as he took me home safely from that dance.” A “better place” might not have been the best phrase there was already something stultifying about the frozen way we were asked to look at set pieces from their marriage without inquiring too much.

Does love mean not having to talk about politics, or about money? Ann’s contradictions in this respect are not new, but they are revealing, both about her and about her husband’s political program. She has opened up more about what might be seen as intensely personal matters—talking about her illnesses, and, Tuesday morning on CBS, about a miscarriage she had in her forties. (Mitt looked surprised at one point, and, asked about it, said that he hadn’t known how much the loss had upset their youngest son until hearing it then.) But the closer that Ann gets to matters that are properly public—like her husband’s wealth and financial connections, and how they might affect his policies as President—the more insistent her claims to privacy become. Her line about Mitt not liking to talk about how he helps others is baffling on its own—shouldn’t someone who is running for President give us a hint?—and also echoes the shameless explanation that she and her husband gave, in an interview with Parade, for not releasing their tax returns: that it would embarrass them by revealing just how charitable they were, and even impinging on their faith: “One of the downsides of releasing one’s financial information is that this is now all public, but we had never intended our contributions to be known. It’s a very personal thing between ourselves and our commitment to our God and to our church,” Mitt said.

Ann was the most on edge—after a relaxed, genial opening—when she began to talk about her husband’s “success,” as she put it, and what she all but called other people’s jealousy. “You know what, it actually amazes me to see his history of success being attacked,” she said, and asked if we wanted our children to be “afraid of success,” and said that if President Obama had been successful he wouldn’t be “attacking” success. She acknowledged that her husband had started life on firm ground—she mentioned “values” and education, not that he was the son of a governor, auto executive, and Presidential candidate--and then said, “I can tell you Mitt Romney was not handed success—he built it!”

“He built it”—maybe this had to be said. A variation on the line was in pretty much every Republican speech, and written on signs all over the convention hall: “We built it.” It is remarkable to see how much can be made of a misquotation. The reference is to President Obama saying, not that business owners didn’t build anything, but that there were things that helped them, like roads and schools, that no one person can build alone. What is interesting is why the words have such rhetorical force. Part of it is the idea of Obama as a hater of private enterprise the other, though, is in the “we”—and the character of the implied “they,” the non-builders. In this telling, America is something that was built by people about whom Barack Obama knows and understands nothing. The most remarkable, and dubious, achievement of the Republican convention so far has been to make “we,” the most inclusive word in the English language, into an exclusionary one. The same might be said about love, which in the Romney story acts as a door that closes.

Another apparent rhetorical directive was to mention not just small businesses but “family businesses,” as often as possible. (Kelly Ayotte of New Hampshire was especially good at that.) The phrase came up so deliberately and repetitively as to imply a patriotism of inheritance, something that should not be confused with a patriotic heritage.


Watch the video: Whats Hot: Ann Romneys Speech