Atakapa- Tug - History

Atakapa- Tug - History


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Atakapa

An Indian tribe that once inhabited territory which is now southwestern Louisiana and southeastern Texas.

(ATF-149: dp. 1,675; 1. 205'; b. 38'6"; dr. 15'4"; s. 16.5 k.; cpl. 85; a. 13", 2 40mm., 2 20mm., 2 dct.; el. Abnaki)

The fleet ocean tug (ATF-149) was laid down on 17 February 1944 at Charleston, S.C., by the Charleston Shipbuilding & Drydock Co.; launched on 11 July 1944; sponsored by Mrs. B. H. Wiggs; and commissioned at the Charleston Navy Yard on 8 December 1944.

After shakedown in the Norfolk area, Atakapa undertook her first assignment, a tow from the east coast to California, departing Philadelphia on 22 January 1945 and reaching San Francisco on 8 March. From that day through 27 April, she engaged in routine towing operations along the west coast. The ship sailed for Hawaii on the 27th and, upon her arrival at Pearl Harbor on 10 Ma resumed her towing operations. This duty was interupted by a long tow from Pearl Harbor to Eniwetok, which began on 20 June. After reaching Eniwetok on 10 July, Atakapa left three days later bound for Johnston Island where she took two craft in tow and proceeded back to Pearl Harbor which she reached on 26 July.

Atakapa engaged in towing and salvage operations until 11 August when she departed the Hawaiian Islands bound for the Aleutians. The tug reached Adak on 22 August, a week after Jap an capitulated. The units gathered there formed Task Force (TP) 42 and sailed on 1 September for Ominato, Japan. They reached Japan on 13 September, and Atakapa served in Japanese waters into April 1946.

The tug returned to Pearl Harbor on 23 April for repairs before heading for the United States late in May. She transited the Panama Canal on 14 June and reached Jacksonville, Fla., on the 25th. The ship reported to Orange, Tex. on 21 August for duty and ultimate transfer to the inactive fleet. She was placed out of commission, in reserve, on 8 November 1946.

Atakapa was recommissioned at Orange on 9 August 1951, slightly over a year after communist forces invaded South Korea. She held shakedown training at Newport, R.I., and Norfolk, Va., and made the first major tow of her new career in February 1952, when she pulled a large vessel from Panama to Phil ad I phia. From April to July, Atakapa was stationed at Guantanamo My, Cuba, and devoted herself largely to target towing. The vessel returned to Norfolk in July and spent the remainder of the year providing general towing and salvage services in the Norfolk area and along the east coast.

For the next five and one-half years, Atakapa maintained a busy schedule of towing and salvage operations. She visited ports along the east coast, in the Caribbean, and along the gulf coast.

On 23 July 1958, the tug began her first Mediterranean deployment in response to internal disorder in Lebanon. While operating with the 6th Fleet, she provided towing and salvage services and made port calls at Suda Bay, Crete; Beirut, Lebanon; Athens and Rhodes, Greece; and Catania, Sicily. Before returning to the United States, Atakapa towed a ship through the Suez Canal from Massawa, Ethiopia, to Naples, Italy.

The small ship spent 1959 and 1960 providing general services to east coast ships. In early 1961, she spent six weeks in Puerto Rico participating in Operation "Springboard" and then crossed the Atlantic in May and June with a tow from Mayport, Fla., to Holy Loch, Scotland.

Atakapa began 1962 in upkeep at Little Creek, Va., but soon sailed for the Caribbean to take part in Operation "Springboard 62." She provided towing and target retrieval service for units serving at Guantanamo Bay. Atakapa returned to Norfolk in June for a tender availability. Upon its completion, she provided services for submarines operating out of Norfolk. In October, the tug reported for duty in the Caribbean in response to the Cuban missile crisis but returned home when tension subsided and ended the year at Little Creek.

On 4 January 1963, the ship sailed to San Juan, Puerto Rico, to take part in Operation "Springboard" for the third straight year, but was back in Little Creek on 7 February for a short availability. During March and April, Atakapa received an overhaul. After two months of refresher training, she put to sea in early October, bound for Guantanamo Bay. The tug returned to Little Creek in late November and finished the year in upkeep.

For the first few months of 1964, Atakapa operated in the Norfolk area. In June, she proceeded to Rota, Spain, with ARDM-1 in tow. After releasing the medium auxiliary repair dry dock, she remained deployed with the 6th Fleet for four months. The tug got underway in October to return to the United States, but was diverted en route to escort an LST to Bermuda and thence to Norfolk. They arrived in Hampton Roads on 17 November, and Atakapa spent the rest of the year undergoing a tender availability.

After a brief period of local operations, Atakapa sailed in early 1965 to the Caribbean to participate in Operation "Springboard." Early in April, she returned to the Norfolk area for an overhaul at the Norfolk Shipbuilding & Drydock Co. Upon completing the yard period, the tug resumed operations in the Virginia capes area. Late in the year r, she operated briefly at Guantanamo Bay and, after visiting Ocho Rios, Jamaica, returned to Little Creek.

The ship's first major activity of 1967 was once again Operation "Springboard "-in which she participated from 6 to 19 March. The tug entered restricted availability at Norfolk on 23 April and, soon after it ended, began a deployment to northern Europe on 15 May. She operated in the Norwegian Sea and visited ports in Norway, Scotland, and the Netherlands before returning to Little Creek on I October. She operated in the Virginia apes area through the end of the year and into May 1967.

On 19th of that month, the tug got underway for Scotland', reached Holy Loch on 30 May, and on 6 June was underway again for Rota. She operated in the Mediterranean until late September and visited the ports of Suda Bay, Crete; Valetta, Malta; Naples, Italy; Izmir, Turkey; and Palma, Mallorca. Atakapa touched back at Little Creek on 29 September; completed a period of leave and upkeep: and, on 27 November, entered overhaul at the Norfolk Shipbuilding & Drydock Co.

The overhaul was completed in mid-April 1968, and the vessel began refresher training. On 13 June, she got underway for operations in European waters and made port calls in Spain, England, Italy, Greece, and Crete. The tug left Rota on 12 October; returned to Little Creek on the 22d; and, on 17 December, began an availability alongside Vulcan (AR-5).

On 25 February 1969, Atakapa shifted to Little Creek for upkeep. On 15 April, she was deployed to western Europe. She made port calls at Rosyth and Holy Loch, Scotland; Bergen, Norway; Aalburg, Denmark; and Portsmouth, England. She departed Rota on 24 September and reached Little Creek on 7 October.

Late in January 1970, she sailed for Portsmouth, N.H., to tow a ship back to Little Creek. She was deployed to Guantanamo Bay on 13 May to provide target services for warships undergoing gunnery practice. The ship left Cuba on 12 June and next towed a ship from Mayport, Fla., to Philadelphia. On 25 June, the tug was back in the Virginia capes area. Routine towing duties to various ports along the east coast occupied her until 16 October, when she sailed for Baltimore, Md., for hull repairs. On 27 October, she shifted back to a shipyard in Newport News, Va., for the remainder of the overhaul.

Refresher training and upkeep lasted until late in March 1971. Atakapa made a brief voyage to St. Thomas, Virgin Islands, then returned to Little Creek on 9 April. She was involved in routine towing operations along th he east coast until 11 November when she sailed for Guantanamo Bay. The tug returned to Little Creek on 21 December for the holidays.

After one and one-half months of training, Atakapa deployed to Roosevelt Roads, Puerto Rico, on 16 February 1972. he provided target services for units participating in Operation "S ingboard," but was back in home port on 23 March. On 1 May, the tug towed Cache (AO-67) to Beaumont, Tex., and then pulled a vessel from that gulf port back to Norfolk, arriving there on 16 May. Local operations and availability occupied Atakapa through 21 July, when she got underway for Guantanamo Bay. She operated from that Cuban port for the next five weeks and then returned to Little Creek on 30 August for local operations through the rest of the year and the first months of 1973. On 11 April, Atakapa sailed for Guantanamo Bay, but was back in the V Virginia capes area on 15 May. Another Caribbean deployment occurred from 28 June to 9 August. After her return home, the tug operated along the east coast.

In early 1974, Atakapa sailed for the Caribbean for the annual "Springboard" operations. She operated along the east coast for the last few months of her career as a commissioned Navy ship. On 1 July 1974, the tug was decommissioned and turned over to the Military Sealift Command (MSC). Operating with a civil service crew, USNS Atakapa (T-ATF-149) continued to support the Navy carrying out MSC missions for another seven years. During the summer of 1981, she was taken out of service and prepared for transfer to the Maritime Administration's National Defense Reserve Fleet. In September 1981, Atakapa-still Navy property-was berthed at the Maritime Administration facil lity at James River, Va. As of the middle of 1987, Atakapa remained inactive in the James River.


Atakapa- Tug - History

The early development of what is now ITB can be traced back to 1958 with cable-laying operations in B.C.&rsquos Gulf Islands under the direction of Capt. Fred Lewis. In an effort to arrange telephone communication between islands, Lewis and his neighbors deployed salvaged BC Tel cables with such proficiency that BC Tel enlisted their services. This would subsequently lead to a relationship with BC Hydro. In 1962 Peter Shields purchased the business assets of Coal Island Ltd. from his father-in-law Capt. Lewis&rsquo estate and continued to operate and expand the business to include other operations.

Having left his family&rsquos construction business in the early 1960s, Peter Shields, a civil engineer, began developing properties that were principally situated in the Gulf Islands of British Columbia.

Disappointed with unpredictable and inadequate barge service, Shields purchased his own tug and barge in 1964 and somewhat accidentally ended up in the towboat business. The following year Shields Navigation Ltd. was created to take over marine operations with Coal Island Ltd. remaining as the parent company.

Peter&rsquos son, Bob Shields, began spending his summers working on the tugs at age 14. By the time Bob graduated from The University of Victoria with a BA in Economics, he had clocked enough hours to write his Mate&rsquos ticket, and soon after, his Master&rsquos. In 1987 Captain Bob Shields transitioned into office life where the experience he had garnered at sea proved invaluable providing him with a first-hand understanding and a well-founded sense of how to move forward and develop company interests. Peter, who had purchased Seaspan in 1986, became occupied with its management and so entrusted Bob to run what was then Shields Navigation and Standard Towing. With an upgraded fleet intended to increase presence in the bulk oil trade, business expanded rapidly, a success founded principally on the abilities of those involved.

During the late 1970s, oil businesses sought to increase control of their transportation requirements, with several companies constructing their own oil tankers to be managed by third parties such as Shields Navigation. During this time, Shields built and acquired barges, deck barges, and a log barge. By 1990 Shields Navigation was transporting a sizeable amount of the materials on the West Coast. By the early &lsquo90s, on the heels of the Exxon Valdez disaster, oil companies determined that retaining shipping assets was no longer in their best interests leading to Shields Navigation having the opportunity to acquire a number of vessels. Shields created a new company, Island Tug and Barge (ITB), to be the primary entity for owning and managing the oil transportation fleet. ITB established contracts encompassing shipping operations from South East Alaska to Puget Sound. With a sizable commitment to the acquisition of new equipment, the stage was set for the primary role that ITB would play in the tug and barge and oil transport industry.

In the mid 1990s, ITB was firmly positioned in a business which was demanding double-hulled oil transportation vessels. Any company intending to thrive in oil transport had to seriously consider replacing aging single hulled equipment. Headed to China to scout for potential shipyards, Shields contacted sponsor companies to gauge their interest in double-hulled barges. A primary sponsor expressed interest, and having toured China, a design was sketched, and soon finalized. A ship building contract was signed a month later in China which would involve two double-hulled barges, setting a precedent for the introduction of a new piece of equipment approximately every two years. With a strong culture of innovation, ITB seeks to take an active role in, and continually elevate its standard of the design and construction of its equipment.


Atakapa Ishak

The Atakapan people are a Southeastern culture of Native American tribes who spoke Atakapa and historically lived along the Gulf of Mexico. They called themselves the Ishak, pronounced "ee-SHAK", which translates as "The People" and further designated themselves within the tribe as "The Sunrise People" and "The Sunset People". Descendants still live in Louisiana and Texas. In 2006 the Atakapa-Ishak met as one nation.

Atakapa Archive

View videos and historical documents of the Atakapa Ishak Tribe. Add to the archive, and help us spread the word of our Indian history.

Atakapa Registration

If your a descendant of the Atakapa Nation, please register and help us get federal recognition.

Donate to the Tribe

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Atakapa

USS Atakapa ATF - 149 was an Achomawi class of fleet ocean tug. It was named after the Atakapa Native American tribe that once inhabited territory which
Atakapa natively Yukhiti is an extinct language isolate native to southwestern Louisiana and nearby coastal eastern Texas. It was spoken by the Atakapa
various times in their history, they were associated with the neighboring Atakapa and Chitimacha peoples. The name Opelousa has been thought to have many
Greater Houston area. They are regarded as a band of the Atakapa Indians, closely related to the Atakapa of Lake Charles, Louisiana. Alvar Nuñez Cabeza de Vaca
The Bidai were a tribe of Atakapa Indians from eastern Texas. Their oral history says that the Bidai were the original people in their region. Their central
Muskogean languages, along with four language isolates: Natchez, Tunica, Atakapa and possibly Chitimacha. Gulf was proposed as a language family by Mary
operation until 1960. According to tradition, Calcasieu was named after an Atakapa chieftain. U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System:
grouped together the Comecrudo, Cotoname, Coahuilteco, Karankawa, Tonkawa, Atakapa and Maratino languages into a Coahuiltecan grouping. Edward Sapir 1920
area were Atakapa Indians. Several burial mounds exist along the Vermilion and Bayou Teche. The earliest records label the area as the Atakapa and Opelousas
Babak, village in Kerman Province, Iran also known as Esḩāq or Is - hāq Atakapa a people who call themselves Ishak The Polikarpov I - 16, a Soviet fighter

acute dysentery on his return trip from Champ d Asile, but was healed by Atakapa natives. He was president of the Washington branch of the Bank of the United
in 1972. The church was founded in 1765 by Acadian refugees settling in Atakapa country the first church was probably designed by French military engineer
to Spanish Archived from the original on April 3, 2017. Atakapas Ishak Indians, Atakapa Native American Indians, Creole Indians or the Native aboriginal
Nahuatl Pame Sur Tepecano Tubar Abnaki, Eastern Adai Ais Alsea Apalachee Atakapa Atsina Atsugewi language Barbareño Biloxi Calusa Cayuse Chehalis Chimariko
Europeans to contact the Atakapa translated shi ishol as zy ikol Four hundred years later, the mixed - blood descendants of Atakapas and Africans would
located was visited regularly by different tribes of the area, including the Atakapa and Choctaw people. Game was abundant here, and the Indians called it their
kept her at Norfolk until 4 June 1964 when she was taken under tow by Atakapa to begin the long journey to her homeport of Rota, Spain. With USS Mahoa YTM - 519
Choctaw, Atakapa - Ishak, French, African, Irish, Italian, and Spanish descent. Professor Jolivette is the former tribal historian for the Atakapa - Ishak Nation
Military Form DD 149, Application for Correction of Military Record USS Atakapa ATF - 149 was a United States Navy Abnaki - class fleet ocean tug during
Gulf of Mexico. The name Calcasieu comes via French from the Indian Atakapa language katkosh, for eagle and yok, to cry The Calcasieu rises in
consider themselves related to the Chitimacha, Choctaw, Acolapissa, and Atakapa Since the 1970s, tribal members have become increasingly involved in environmental
Statistical Area. In the last quarter of the 18th century, there was an Atakapa chief Nementou. On April 16, 1784, he sold land on Bayou Plaquemine Brule

respectively. Prior to European colonization, the area was primarily home to the Atakapa tribe. The first Europeans arrived in the 1730s, and they were predominantly
other historical tribes located in the region, notably the Acolapissa, Atakapas and Biloxi Indians. The Tribe has approximately 680 members. In 1996
trading flint from Caddoan peoples to their north to the stone deficit Atakapa and Chitimacha peoples of the Gulf Coast. The Avoyel were also known by
1919 A structural and lexical comparison of the Tunica, Chitimacha, and Atakapa languages. Govt. Printing Office. Retrieved 25 August 2012. Thomas Noxon
comes from the Atakapa word, spelled quelqueshue in a French transliteration, and meaning crying eagle. This was the name of an Atakapa chief, which French
territory between the Atchafalaya River and Bayou Nezpique, where the Eastern Atakapa lived, as the Attakapas Territory, adopting the name from the Choctaw language
Mexico and Bayou Nezpique, occupied by the Attakapas Indians Eastern Atakapa was named Attakapas Territory. In 1764 France established the Opelousas
In 1840, he wrote a memoir of his family s journey from Maryland to the Atakapas country in south Louisiana. From 1843 - 1846, Nicholls was presiding judge

  • USS Atakapa ATF - 149 was an Achomawi class of fleet ocean tug. It was named after the Atakapa Native American tribe that once inhabited territory which
  • Atakapa natively Yukhiti is an extinct language isolate native to southwestern Louisiana and nearby coastal eastern Texas. It was spoken by the Atakapa
  • various times in their history, they were associated with the neighboring Atakapa and Chitimacha peoples. The name Opelousa has been thought to have many
  • Greater Houston area. They are regarded as a band of the Atakapa Indians, closely related to the Atakapa of Lake Charles, Louisiana. Alvar Nuñez Cabeza de Vaca
  • The Bidai were a tribe of Atakapa Indians from eastern Texas. Their oral history says that the Bidai were the original people in their region. Their central
  • Muskogean languages, along with four language isolates: Natchez, Tunica, Atakapa and possibly Chitimacha. Gulf was proposed as a language family by Mary
  • operation until 1960. According to tradition, Calcasieu was named after an Atakapa chieftain. U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System:
  • grouped together the Comecrudo, Cotoname, Coahuilteco, Karankawa, Tonkawa, Atakapa and Maratino languages into a Coahuiltecan grouping. Edward Sapir 1920
  • area were Atakapa Indians. Several burial mounds exist along the Vermilion and Bayou Teche. The earliest records label the area as the Atakapa and Opelousas
  • Babak, village in Kerman Province, Iran also known as Esḩāq or Is - hāq Atakapa a people who call themselves Ishak The Polikarpov I - 16, a Soviet fighter
  • acute dysentery on his return trip from Champ d Asile, but was healed by Atakapa natives. He was president of the Washington branch of the Bank of the United
  • in 1972. The church was founded in 1765 by Acadian refugees settling in Atakapa country the first church was probably designed by French military engineer
  • to Spanish Archived from the original on April 3, 2017. Atakapas Ishak Indians, Atakapa Native American Indians, Creole Indians or the Native aboriginal
  • Nahuatl Pame Sur Tepecano Tubar Abnaki, Eastern Adai Ais Alsea Apalachee Atakapa Atsina Atsugewi language Barbareño Biloxi Calusa Cayuse Chehalis Chimariko
  • Europeans to contact the Atakapa translated shi ishol as zy ikol Four hundred years later, the mixed - blood descendants of Atakapas and Africans would
  • located was visited regularly by different tribes of the area, including the Atakapa and Choctaw people. Game was abundant here, and the Indians called it their
  • kept her at Norfolk until 4 June 1964 when she was taken under tow by Atakapa to begin the long journey to her homeport of Rota, Spain. With USS Mahoa YTM - 519
  • Choctaw, Atakapa - Ishak, French, African, Irish, Italian, and Spanish descent. Professor Jolivette is the former tribal historian for the Atakapa - Ishak Nation
  • Military Form DD 149, Application for Correction of Military Record USS Atakapa ATF - 149 was a United States Navy Abnaki - class fleet ocean tug during
  • Gulf of Mexico. The name Calcasieu comes via French from the Indian Atakapa language katkosh, for eagle and yok, to cry The Calcasieu rises in
  • consider themselves related to the Chitimacha, Choctaw, Acolapissa, and Atakapa Since the 1970s, tribal members have become increasingly involved in environmental
  • Statistical Area. In the last quarter of the 18th century, there was an Atakapa chief Nementou. On April 16, 1784, he sold land on Bayou Plaquemine Brule
  • respectively. Prior to European colonization, the area was primarily home to the Atakapa tribe. The first Europeans arrived in the 1730s, and they were predominantly
  • other historical tribes located in the region, notably the Acolapissa, Atakapas and Biloxi Indians. The Tribe has approximately 680 members. In 1996
  • trading flint from Caddoan peoples to their north to the stone deficit Atakapa and Chitimacha peoples of the Gulf Coast. The Avoyel were also known by
  • 1919 A structural and lexical comparison of the Tunica, Chitimacha, and Atakapa languages. Govt. Printing Office. Retrieved 25 August 2012. Thomas Noxon
  • comes from the Atakapa word, spelled quelqueshue in a French transliteration, and meaning crying eagle. This was the name of an Atakapa chief, which French
  • territory between the Atchafalaya River and Bayou Nezpique, where the Eastern Atakapa lived, as the Attakapas Territory, adopting the name from the Choctaw language
  • Mexico and Bayou Nezpique, occupied by the Attakapas Indians Eastern Atakapa was named Attakapas Territory. In 1764 France established the Opelousas
  • In 1840, he wrote a memoir of his family s journey from Maryland to the Atakapas country in south Louisiana. From 1843 - 1846, Nicholls was presiding judge

A Dictionary of the Atakapa Language Accompanied by Text.

Atakapa Indians Tûk pa han yan ya di, Biloxi name. Yukhiti ishak, own name. OLAC resources in and about the Atakapa language. Explore Instagram posts for tag atakapa. I learned a lot more about the Chitimacha, Avoyel, Houma, Atakapa, and more all in one tour. SE Texas Atakapa tribe seeking federal designation. Atakapa Indian Culture and History. As a complement to our Atakapa language information, here is our collection of indexed links about the Atakapa tribe and.

The Mossy Grove Tradition Texas Beyond History.

Atakapa Ishak Tribe of Southeast Texas and Southwest Louisiana is a an Charitable Organization headquartered in Lake Charles, LA. Atakapa Ishak Tribe C. I. noun. Sense 1. Meaning: A language spoken by the Atakapa of the Gulf Coast of Louisiana and Texas play. Synonyms: Atakapa Atakapan Attacapa. Facts for Kids: Atakapa Indians Atakapas Orrins Website. Get free access to the complete judgment in Atakapa Indian De Creole Nation v. Louisiana on CaseMine.

Atakapa Indian de Creole v. State of Louisiana, 19 30032.

The name Atakapa is a Choctaw name meaning people eater hattak person, apa to eat, a reference to the practice of ritual cannibalism. The Gulf coast. Atakapa People. Religion: tribal religion. Related ethnic groups. isolate language group, intermarried with Caddo and Koasati. The Atakapa are an indigenous people of the. Atakapa Wor Dictionary of English. The Atakapa 2. Choctaw 3. The Natchez 4. The Tunica 5. Chitimacha 6. Okelousa 7. Washa 8. Chawasha 9. Adai. 10. Doustione 11. Natchitoches 12. Ouanchita. Atakapa Instagram posts photos and videos. Atakapa Services, LLC has 17 total employees across all of its locations and generates $1.20 million in sales USD. D&B Hoovers provides sales leads and sales.

Atakapa Guide to the Indigenous Materials at the American.

Languages with words listed include Chitimacha, Atakapa, Cherokee, Osage, Chickasaw, Choctaw, Nottoway, Kansa, Omaha, Dakota, Pawnee, Nanticoke,. Atakapa language Spoken language. Get this from a library! Grammar of the Atakapa language, abridged language of the Atakapa ishak Indians of southwest Louisiana and southeast Texas. The Atakapa Indians: Cannibals of Louisiana jstor. Today, we know that most of these Native Americans belonged to one of two cultures: the Atakapa or the Karankawa. The Atakapas lived in the northern part of.

The Atakapa Ishak: Introducing a Historic and Living Native.

That the Spanish named the tribe Atakapa because these In. 1 Fred B. Kniffen, The Indians of Louisiana Baton Rouge, 1945, 108. 2 John R. Swanton, Indian. Meet the Atakapa Ishak Greater New Orleans Foundation. OLAC resources in and about the Atakapa language. ISO 639 3: aqp. The combined catalog of all OLAC participants contains the following resources that are. Atakapa, Atakapas WordWeb dictionary definition. Travelers stopping in will be delighted to find a rare colection of Atakapa Indians artifacts located at this site.

The Lake Charles Atakapa Language Southwest Louisiana.

Many Atakapa Ishak no longer know their correct racial identity. For more information on this tribe, their journey toward federal recognition and. A Structural and Lexical Comparison of the Tunica, Chitimacha, and. Last Name A Z. Last Name A Z Number of Programs. Rosina Phillipe. Representative, Atakapa Ishak Tribe. 1 Videos See all Atakapa Ishak Tribe people. Atakapa tribe Emaze. Atakapa means eaters of men in Choctaw, but the question has been raised whether the Atakapas cannibalism was for subsistence or ritual. Village chiefs in the. Atakapa Indians Access Genealogy. In industrialized America, the Atakapa people were an afterthought those who cared thought them to be extinct, according to historians and. Atakapa Indians Search results Louisiana Digital Library. Get the FREE one click dictionary software for Windows or the iPhone iPad and Android apps. Noun: Atakapa uta ku pu. A language spoken by the Atakapa of.

What did the Atakapa tribe eat?.

Sep 21, 2019 Explore Doug Houstons board Atakapa Indians on Pinterest. See more ideas about native american, native american culture, arrowheads. What does atakapa mean Definition of atakapa Word finder. Atakapa. Details. Term Type. Art & Architecture Thesaurus. Preferred Term. Atakapa. Variations. Attacapa Indians. Atakapa indians. Related Events. Related​ Следующая Войти Настройки. Atakapa Portland Art Museum. The Lake Charles Atakapa Language Although the Atakapa Indians have abandoned their tribal organization many years ago on account of the paucity of.​. Atakapa tribe Bisnow. The Atakapa, along with their neighbors the coastal Akokisa and interior Bidai tribes, were among the populations whose cultures formed the southwestern.

10 Atakapa Indians ideas native american, native american.

Atakapa Ishak Nation aims to gain federal recognition through BIA September 3, 2014. The tribe filed a letter stating its intent to petition in 2007, according to. ATAKAPA INDIANS Louisiana 101. Parties, docket activity and news coverage of federal case Atakapa Indian de Creole Nation v. Trump et al, case number 3:19 cv 00028, from Louisiana Middle​. Atakapa pedia. Atakapa is an extinct language isolate native to southwestern Louisiana and nearby coastal eastern Texas. It was spoken by the Atakapa people also known as. Grammar of the Atakapa language, abridged language of the. This page is part of © FOTW Flags Of The World website. Atakapa Ishak Nation, Louisiana U.S. Native American. Last modified: 2020 03 22 by rick wyatt.

Atakapa Ishak Nation @IshakWords Twitter.

The Atakapa Ishak Trail AIT is a multi phased, multi use trail that will ultimately connect the near by communities of Lafayette, Breaux Bridge, St. Martinville,. And Now You Know: My story of meeting the Atakapas Orange. By Jeffrey Darensbourg Tribal Council Member of the Alligator Band at Atakapa ​Ishak Nation of Southwest Louisiana and Southeast Texas and. The Akokisa and the Atakapans The TARL Blog. The Atakapa Ishak uh TAK uh paw – ee SHAK are a SW Louisiana SE Texas branch of ancient Indians who lived in the Gulf of Mexicos NW.

News atakapa ishak.

Most of their diet was fish and seafood including oysters, shrimp, and crabs. Atakapa men also hunted big game like deer, buffalo, and. Atakapa Family Trees, Crests, Genealogy, DNA, More Linkpendium. The Atakapa əˈtækəpə, pɑː also, Atacapa, are an indigenous people of the Southeastern Woodlands, who spoke the Atakapa language and historically. Atakapan Indians, Texas Indians. Atakapa Indian Language Atakapa Ishak. Language: Atakapa is a Gulf language, once spoken along the Louisiana and East Texas coast. Atakapa is an​. Atakapa definition of Atakapa by The Free Dictionary. The Atakapans are a hard group to find out much about. Here is some of what is known. The several tribes and bands lived in an area starting around modern. Atakapa Indian de Creole Nation v. Trump et al Law360. Atakapa Ishak An Attakapas, by Alexandre De Batz, 1735 Total population.

A Dictionary of the Atakapa Language: Accompanied by Text.

The Atakapa, are an indigenous people of the Southeastern Woodlands, who spoke the Atakapa language and historically lived along the Gulf of Mexico. The competing Choctaw people used this term for this people, and European settlers adopted the term from them. The Atakapan people were made up of several bands. Atakapa language pedia. Опубликовано: 15 дек. 2017 г. Atakapa Ishak Tree. Atakapa. Details. Term Type. Art & Architecture Thesaurus. Preferred Term. Atakapa. Variations. Attacapa Indians. Atakapa indians. Related Events. Related​.

Atakapa Ishak Nation, Louisiana U.S. CRW Flags.

Pedia. Atakapa. The Atakapa are an indigenous people of the Southeastern Woodlands, who spoke the Atakapa language and historically lived along the Gulf. The Atakapa tribe. Cannibalisim a Fandom. Phonologic Formulas for Atakapa Chitimacha. Morris Swadesh. Morris Swadesh. Search for more articles by this author PDF Add to favorites Download.


Atakapa- Tug - History

Built in 1941, by the Jakobson Shipyard Company of Oyster Bay, New York (hull #287) as the Dauntless No. 15 for the Dauntless Towing Company of New York, New York.

In 1975, the tug was acquired by the United States Army. Where she was designated as the Col. Albert H. Barkley.

In 1975, she was acquired by the Foss Launch and Tug Company of Tacoma, Washington. Where she was renamed as the Andrew Foss.

In 1980, The tug was acquired by Puget Sound Freight Lines of Seattle, Washington. Where she was renamed as the Pachena.

In 1988, she was acquired by the Western Towboat Company of Seattle, Washington. Where the tug retained her name.

In 1998, the tug was acquired by the Channel Construction Company of Juneau, Alaska. Where she retained her name.

In 1999, the Channel Construction Company renamed the tug as the Lumberman. And, she was re documented as a recreational yacht. Where she was converted to a live-aboard for her owner.

In 2006, she went out of documentation. At this time, the tug was was located at Juneau, Alaska, where she was "anchored out," for use as a fishing lodge.

In May 2018, the tug drifted on to a sandbar in the Gastineau Channel near Juneau, Alaska.

In 2021, the tug was sunk as a reef 54 miles west of Cross Sound, Alaska.

Originally powered by a single, EMD-16-645-C diesel engine, rated at 1,660 horsepower. In 2010, the tug's main engine engine developed problems. And, it was determined that the problem could not be rectified.

In May 2018, the tug drifted on to a sandbar in the Gastineau Channel near Juneau, Alaska.
(Captain Ric Shrewsbury, Gordon Olsen, Kyle Stubbs)


Continued operations

For the remainder of the year Opportune operated along the east coast visiting the Canal Zone in June and in August she returned to Cape Canaveral for the unmanned Apollo 202 launch. Into 1970 Opportune continued to serve the Atlantic Fleet.

USS Opportune (ARS-41) receiving VERTREP from USS Concord (AFS-5) in the Adriatic, 1983

Opportune assisted with the recovery of the Space Shuttle Challenger (destroyed of the coast of Florida in 1986) and was later deployed in support of Operation Just Cause to keep the Panama Canal open and operating at normal capacity. The Opportune conducted several support missions in the Caribbean and conducted several interesting towing operations prior to deployment to the Mediterranean during Operation Desert Storm/Shield as the US Navy's standby rescue and salvage ship. The Opportune assisted in the recovery of numerous downed aircraft (fixed wing and helicopters) and assisted with several at-sea firefighting/towing operations prior to returning to her home port at Little Creek, VA. The Opportune was eventually decommissioned while homeported at Little Creek, VA. [1]


On Board the World's Most Powerful Tugboat

The Methane Princess is inbound, and she's not to be trifled with. She's 909 feet long and 142 feet wide, draws 33 feet and is loaded with liquefied natural gas (LNG). The 94,000-ton vessel is perceived as a giant floating bomb, and at slow speeds, within the confines of crowded shipping channels and ports, there's simply not enough water passing over her rudder to maintain steerage. She might as well be adrift. Which is why, on this muggy, overcast September afternoon, the tractor tugboat Edward J. Moran is churning down the Savannah River, headed 8 miles into the Atlantic off the Georgia coast to meet the Princess and escort her to the Elba Island LNG terminal, 5 miles east of Savannah. And why the Edward and her sister ship Bulldog, owned by another company and heading out with us, are tasked with the job: They are the most powerful, sophisticated tugs in the United States. "She's got the strength of a center in the NFL," David Missroon, the Edward's captain, says of his vessel, "with the speed and agility of a defensive end."

Up in the pilothouse, Missroon is sitting in a Kirk-like Star Trek chair, each forearm resting on a console, each hand holding a fist-size joystick knob. Missroon flicks his wrists. The ship pitches forward--the force is strong enough to send me to the deck, but I'm holding on with both hands. Almost as quickly, the tug comes to a dead stop and then lurches backward. I've been around the water my whole life, and I've never seen a vessel move the way the Edward moves, much less one 98 feet long and packing 6500 hp: She can go from 13 knots forward to 13 knots in reverse in 15 seconds. Another twist of the joysticks and the ship pivots 360 degrees within her own length.

The reason for all this power and agility is simple. To convince a skittish public of the safety of transporting LNG, the Coast Guard and the LNG industry are building a fleet of tugs that are able to maintain absolute control over the tankers in port at all times.

Water Power

For nearly 200 years tugboats have butted, towed and nudged big ships in American harbors. But handling the current maritime fleet of mammoth vessels calls for greater speed, agility, safety and power. Here's the hardware that gets the job done.

1. Swiveling Twin Propellers

Twin screws known as Z-drives extend from the bottom of the hull like room fans and rotate 360 degrees, enabling tugs to go from a top speed of 14 knots to zero within a boatlength and to move forward while turned sideways.

2. The Engine

Twin 12-cylinder diesels with 710 cubic inches per cylinder generate 6500 hp--almost twice that of a standard tug.

3.The Winch

It can generate 100 hp--enough to pull the tugboat forward even when the engine is full astern.

4. Fire-Suppression System

To douse fires, the Edward J. Moran, pictured here, calls on the most powerful firefighting capacity afloat. Twin 900-hp pumps pull water through 12-inch risers to a pair of 360-degree nozzles that the crew controls remotely from the pilothouse. The flow rate: 11,800 gallons of water per minute.

When we exit the river and head into the ocean, the swells pick up, and 6-foot waves, driven by winds gusting to 30 knots, crash over the pilothouse. It's a long, rough slog out to the Princess, which finally looms into view--a British-registered, black-hulled steel monolith that left Egypt 12 days ago.

We slide up against the hull in the ship's lee, and Rodney Magwood, the docking pilot, climbs the gangway and disappears inside the tanker. We maneuver to the stern, the bow hard against steel, and deckhand David Krokoski tosses up a light line connected to our tow rope, a 9 1/2-inch braid of Kevlar with a million pounds of breaking strength. We ease back 200 feet into what's known as the in-line position and match the Princess's speed of 9 knots. From here on, the tanker will remain tethered until she's back out at sea.

It takes 2 hours for the Edward to reach the river's mouth. The tug has four crewmen: a captain, a mate, a deckhand and an engineer, and they work a week on and a week off, on standby 24 hours a day for LNG work and whatever else the port throws their way, from docking container ships to rescuing disabled vessels at sea. Missroon is a third-generation Savannah River tug sailor. His mate, Anthony Groover, 25, is the son of a docking pilot who was trained by Missroon's father and who in turn trained Missroon. "When I was a kid, I spent nights on the tugboat with my father," Missroon says, "and my life has mirrored his. He wanted me to go to the University of Georgia, but he died in a car accident when I was a senior in high school. I changed my plans and came to the water." He adjusts the volume of a John Mellencamp song playing on the radio. "My son wants to do the same. He's spent lots of time on the boat, and it's in his blood, just like me."

It's late afternoon when the Edward and the Princess, now under escort by a U.S. Coast Guard helicopter and two Coast Guard rigid-hull inflatable boats, close in on the LNG terminal, a long concrete pier parallel to the shore. These terminals have long been controversial, but all LNG tankers are double-hulled, and during 33,000 voyages over the past 30 years there have been only eight leaks--none of them resulting in fires. LNG won't burn unless it becomes a vapor and dissolves into the air at a concentration of 5 to 15 percent. The worst accident occurred in 1944 in Cleveland at the world's first commercial LNG plant, when a tank failed and spilled its entire contents into creeks and sewers. When the air-gas concentrations were right, the vapor caught fire, killing 128 and injuring 225. Since then there have been four accidents worldwide that resulted in fatalities, all at plants.

"We don't want any chain in the process to be weak," says David Beardsley, vice president of construction and repair for Moran.

We're traveling at 9 knots, and it's time to slow down. From here on, Magwood, the docking pilot on the Princess's bridge, calls the shots. "Half ahead, transverse," he says over the radio.

"Half ahead," replies Groover, now at the Edward's con, as he pivots the joysticks inward, rotating the screws so they're facing away from each other, a maneuver that acts as a brake and is known as a transverse arrest. The Edward shudders violently--it feels as though we're bumping over a washboard dirt road. The meter registering the load on the Edward's line shows 54 tons. The Edward slows to 8 knots, as the Bulldog swings round to the Princess's bow. At 7 knots, Groover shifts to starboard. When the Edward, straining and digging, slowly pulls the Methane Princess's stern around, 94 tons register on the line.

"Five-point-eight and backing," Groover says.

The Edward's bow is pushed down, its stern lifted up it shudders as it backs against the strain.

Bit by bit over the next half-hour, we slow the Princess down to 4 knots. Two more tugs join us, the Bulldog "end on"--bow forward and perpendicular to the ship--against the Princess's bow and two older Moran tugs amidships. The berth is now about 100 yards ahead. As Magwood guides the behemoth in, a dance based on years of experience and intuitive knowledge between docking pilot and tugs commences. "Edward, take me on down again," Magwood says.

"Roger, take you down," Groover says.

"Easy, Dog, easy," Magwood says.

Over the next 45 minutes, the closer we get to the dock, the faster the commands come.

"Easy does it on the Edward," Magwood says. "Thirty percent on the Dog. Easy on the stern tugs, easy." The process is precise and slow, a nudge here, a pull there, four tugs and the Princess--four captains and docking pilots, five individual powerplants--all working in concert.

"Stronger stern tugs, stronger," Magwood commands. "Easy astern, easy. Stop, Edward. In position."

Groover smiles. "We just put it within 1 foot of where he wanted it. Hey, Rodney, nice job!"

When the Princess is safely tied up, the Edward and the Bulldog lie a few hundred feet away they stand by for the next 24 hours of unloading. The two older tugs return to Moran's dock in downtown Savannah. John Johnson emerges from the engine room, and the smell of his homemade enchiladas soon fills the galley below the pilothouse. The galley is better equipped than my kitchen at home, with a full-size stainless-steel fridge and oven. "We all love to cook," first mate Groover says. "Nothing comes out of a box."

Out here on the water, as the sun dips below the river's green banks, it's easy to see why generations of men have plied the tugboat trade. The river is serene, ever-changing. The crewmen are removed from the world but also connected to it in a way merchant seamen in the open ocean never are. With such small crews, even deckhands get a chance at every job. And though they're on board for a week at a time, they remain in home port, and modern conveniences make the job less lonely--cellphones connect to friends and family, and flat-screen TVs in the galley and cabins and Wi-Fi keep the world at hand.

Late the next afternoon, it's hot, bright and blue, and the Princess is empty, ready to disembark. The Bulldog noses into the tanker's starboard bow and ties on. The Edward latches to her stern behind 267 feet of line, and another Moran tug ties on amidships.

"Easy on the Dog," calls Magwood, once again directing from the bridge of the Princess. The Bulldog responds with one long whistle and three short. Before two-way radios, tugs and pilots communicated by whistle most captains still prefer it. One whistle acknowledges the request, three whistles means easy, and four means hooked up, slang for full ahead or astern.

"Straight out on Edward, straight out. Stop the Dog, stop. All stop."

The Edward's engines throb, the river churns and foams, and the rope strains. The Methane Princess begins to slide away from the terminal and into the channel at the stately speed of 1 knot. The tanker is the length of a city block, and such an enormous mass has an inertia that is hard to grasp, yet the tugboats move it with choreographed precision and few words.

We drift backward a bit, and Magwood calls, "Stronger, Edward, stronger."

One long whistle, two short.

"Okay, right on up the river, Edward. Easy, easy, Dog, easy!"

We power backward. The Bulldog pushes on the bow, and the Edward navigates to almost 90 degrees astern of the Princess, shuddering and thrumming and vibrating. The Edward's bow digs into the river, and the stern tilts up, swinging the tanker around, slowly, slowly, until she's pointing downriver.

A churning swirl of water begins under the stern of the Princess as she goes to full ahead. "Edward, full ahead, and home we go!"

It's night by the time we drop off the
Princess 8 miles out, pick up the pilot Magwood and re-enter the river. A high, full moon lights a shimmering path over the water. It's quiet and dark in the pilothouse, the glow of gauges and computer screens soft and comforting in a cocoon of utility and purpose that's removed from the traffic and lights and restaurants of pulsing Savannah, so near but so apart.

In the anonymity of darkness, the stories of men who work 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, to keep it all going unspool. Of pressing and holding steel container ships and tankers to the docks in hurricanes and 60-knot winds. Of times in waves and winds when tugs had to venture out to sea to find disabled ships and bring them safely to port. Of the pride of sons joining their fathers on the water to do gratifying work that's about steel and horsepower amid dynamic waves and currents and wind. Of shared experience and no nagging existential angst about why are we here and what are we doing.

The ship thrums under our feet. It's 10 pm, the dock is near, and the lights of Savannah burn bright, lighting up the horizon. The men on the Edward are like those in coal mines and on deep-sea oil rigs--they're the wizards of Oz, the men behind the curtain, unseen and unheard for the most part, but vital to everything we take for granted.

Before we bump gently against Moran's dock in the moist night, Groover and Krokoski are throwing lines and spraying down. As I step off the tug, I hear whistles tooting somewhere out there, over the river. One long, three short. An answer. Now I know what they mean, and they'll be singing all night long.


Bayou Flora and Fauna

Louisiana’s bayous encompass nearly 3 million acres, and their warm ecosystems create a home for wiregrass, cyprus trees, bottomland hardwoods, mosses, water celery and a host of other varieties of vegetation.

Louisiana’s bayous are home to American alligators, blue herons, shrimp, white-tailed deer and fish. Bayou Bartholomew, a 375-mile-long wetland, supports the lives of more than 100 fish species. Numerous species of migratory nesting birds visit Louisiana bayous in fall and spring.


Fighting back

Under siege: Victims of Malta's polio epidemic had access to only one iron lung © In order to defend the island from the Axis air offensive, Allied fighters continued to be flown in from the west. In March 1942 the British carriers Argus and Eagle flew in the first Spitfire Mk Vs, and in April the American carrier Wasp delivered more, but the Germans succeeded in destroying most of them - either on the ground or in the air.

In May Wasp and Eagle flew in almost 80 Spitfires, and the following month Eagle delivered 55 more. Then the Luftwaffe was diverted in order to support Rommel's further advances in North Africa, and the number of sorties flown by Fliegerkorps II against the island reduced from 8,788 in April to 956 in June.

The tide really began to turn in July .

The tide really began to turn in July, however, with the appointment of Air Vice Marshal Sir Keith Park as air officer commanding. He changed the way in which Malta's fighters were used, repeating his successful Battle of Britain tactics of intercepting enemy raids as soon as possible, on their way to the target, rather than waiting to mount massed attacks on them as they retreated. Losses to the Axis attackers, reinforced by aircraft transferred from Russia, immediately increased, and British losses fell.

But the Allied Spitfires needed fuel to fly, just as Malta itself needed supplies. In June Operation 'Vigorous', an attempt to bring a convoy in from the east, failed - in the face of air attacks from the extended network of Axis airfields in North Africa. With their escorts' ammunition stocks seriously depleted, the ships were obliged to turn for home. Another convoy, this time from the west, called 'Harpoon', only managed to get two out of six ships through, and Park told London he had only seven weeks fuel left. In August, therefore, almost all the available strength of the Royal Navy was put into the major convoy operation of the war, 'Pedestal'.


7 Things You Didn’t Know About the Hatfields and McCoys

1. Hollywood has always loved the Hatfields and McCoys.
The Hatfields and McCoys saga has been reflected in various forms of entertainment, including books, songs and Hollywood films. Some of the most memorable portrayals of the feud include a 1952 Abbot and Costello feature a Hatfield- and McCoy-themed episode of the animated series “Scooby-Doo” and Warner Bros.’ 1950 “Merrie Melodies” cartoon “Hillbilly Hare,” in which Bugs Bunny finds himself ensnared in a dispute between the rival Martin and Coy families.

Frankie McCoy and Shirley Hatfield pose together in a photograph that appeared in Life magazine in May 1944. (Credit: Walter Sanders//Time Life Pictures/Getty Images)

2. The Hatfields and McCoys inspired a famous game show.
The conflict is believed to have been the primary inspiration for the popular game show �mily Feud,” which premiered in 1976. In 1979 members of both families appeared on the show during a special Hatfields and McCoys theme week to battle it out for the usual cash rewards—with one unique twist. Also included in the prize package was a pig, symbolizing the origins of the feud. (It was the rumored theft of a valuable pig by a Hatfield ancestor that had served as a catalyst for the eruption of hostilities more than 100 years earlier.) The Hatfields won the contest.

3. The formerly feuding families were featured in Life magazine in the 1940s.
In May 1944, an issue of Life magazine revisited the Hatfields and McCoys nearly 50 years after violence among them rocked the Tug Valley area between Kentucky and West Virginia. The article was meant to show how the two �mous families now live together in peace,” and interviewed a number of descendants about the rivalry and relations between the two families five decades after the conflict. Among the photographs was a shot of two young women, Shirley Hatfield and Frankie McCoy, working together in a local factory that produced military uniforms. It was meant to symbolize the unifying effect of America’s war efforts at the height of World War II.

4. The feud between the Hatfields and the McCoys made it all the way to the U.S. Supreme Court.
In 1888 several Hatfields were arrested and stood trial for the murder of two of Randall McCoy’s children. West Virginia sued for the men’s release, arguing that they had been illegally extradited across state lines. The Supreme Court eventually became involved in the case, known as Mahon v. Justice. In its 7-2 decision, the court ruled in favor of Kentucky, allowing for the trials and subsequent convictions of all the Hatfield men. Seven of them received life sentences, and one, Ellison 𠇌otton Top” Mounts, was executed for his crimes.

5. A rare medical condition may be partly to blame for the violence of the notorious clash of clans.
In a 2007 study, a team of doctors and geneticists who had studied dozens of McCoy descendants noted an unusually high rate of Von Hippel-Lindau disease, a rare, inherited condition that produces tumors of the eyes, ears, pancreas and adrenal glands as well as high blood pressure, a racing heartbeat and increased 𠇏ight or flight” stress hormones. The researchers also collected numerous oral histories from family members detailing the combative and often violent nature of the McCoy family dating back to the feud’s roots.

6. The Tug Valley witnessed another violent clash nearly 30 years after the Hatfields and McCoys feud.
On May 19, 1920, detectives working for the anti-union Baldwin-Felts Agency evicted the families of workers who had attempted to unionize the Stone Mountain Coal Company mines outside Matewan, West Virginia. After Sid Hatfield, the Matewan chief of police and a Hatfield descendant, intervened on the miners’ behalf, a violent clash broke out that left seven detectives and four locals dead. The Matewan Massacre became a rallying cry for union activists across the country, with Sid Hatfield garnering fame for his defense of the miners. A year later, however, Hatfield was assassinated, purportedly by Baldwin-Felts agents. The events surrounding the Matewan Massacre and Sid Hatfield’s murder were depicted in the acclaimed 1987 film “Matewan.”

7. There are thousands of Hatfield and McCoy descendants𠅋ut not all of them are real.
Sid Hatfield is just one of many notable Hatfield and McCoy descendants. Others include Henry D. Hatfield, nephew of family patriarch Devil Anse, who served as a senator and governor of West Virginia 1930s jazz musician Clyde McCoy and basketball coach Mike D𠆚ntoni. There have even been fictional descendants, including Leonard 𠇋ones” McCoy from the television and film series “Star Trek,” who was supposedly dozens of generations removed from his McCoy family roots.

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