Jeffers DD- 621 - History

Jeffers DD- 621 - History


We are searching data for your request:

Forums and discussions:
Manuals and reference books:
Data from registers:
Wait the end of the search in all databases.
Upon completion, a link will appear to access the found materials.

Jeffers

(DD-621: dp. 1,630; 1. 348'4"; b. 36'1"; dr. 17'5"; s. 35 k.; cpl. 270; a. 4 5'', 4 40mm., 5 20mm., 5 21" tt., 6 dcp.,2 act.; cl. Gleaves. )

Jeffers (DD-621) was laid down by Federal Shipbuilding & Drydock Co., Kearny, N.J., 25 AIarch 1942; launched 26 August 1942; sponsored by AIrs. Lucie Jeffers Lyons, great-granddaughter of Commodore Jeffers; and commissioned 5 November 1942, Lt. Comdr. W. G. McGarry in command

After shakedown and training in Casco Bay, Maine, Jeffers operated briefly on the Fast Coast until departing Norfolk 18 February 1943 on her first transatlantic voyage escorting a convoy to Casablanca and returning 14 April. The ship patrolled off Argentia, Newfoundland, for a week before steaming to Norfolk to prepare for the coming invasion of Sicily.

Jeffers sailed from Norfolk 8 June with Task Force 65 and arrived Oran, Algeria, 22 June. While preparing for the giant assault, she patrolled off other African ports, shooting down a German bomber during 6 Julv Luftwaffe raid on Bizerte. Jeffers sailed 2 days later with Rear Admiral Hall's force for Gela; and, upon arrival 9 June, she guarded the transports. Early next day the great assault began, nith Jeffers assigned the task of shooting out shore searchlights and providing fire support. As the landillg proceeded witll great success in the following days, the ship fired support missions and served on antisubmarine patrol. She sailed to Bizerte 18 July, but was back at Palermo 31 July with cargo ships. Jeffers sailed to Oran the next day, and from that port continued to New York, arriving 22 August.

After repairs at New York, the destroyer was assigned to convoy duty between East Coast ports and Scotland. As the Allies began the great buildup of men and materiel in Britian for the landings in northern France, Jeffers made five voyages between 5 September 1943 and 22 April 1944. On her second convoy crossing to Scotland, 21 October the ship picked up survivors from Murphy, after that destroyer had been cut in two by a tanker. She also took part in salvage operations which saved the stern of the stricken vessel.

After training operations, Jeffers sailed from New York 5 May 1944 for the United Kingdom, where she prepared for the invasion of Normandy in June. She departed Belfast 3 June for Utah Beach, where she patrolled and provided fire support as troops stormed ashore on D-day. The veteran destroyer remained off the beach until 29 June, driving off several enemy planes and assisting damaged ships. For the next two weeks she convoyed transports from Belfast to Utah Beach as more troops and supplies were poured in to the beachead, finally departing for the Mediterranean 16 July.

Next on the Allied timetable for the defeat of Germany was another invasion of France, this one in the south. Assigned to screen escort earriers covering the operation, Jeffers departed Malta 12 August to join her task group. Three days later, as troops landed between Cannes and Toulon, the ship remained with supporting carriers, continuing to eruise off shore until 28 September. She then sailed for New York, arriving 7 October to prepare for duty in the far Pacific.

Jeffers was converted to a destroyer-minesweeper at New York, and was reclassified DMS-27 on 15 November She sailed 3 January 1~5 for the Panama Canal and California, arriving San Diego for training 17 January. In February she moved on to Pearl Harbor and from there to the great advance base at Ulithi to prepare for the Okinawa invasion, last and largest amphibious operation of the war against Japan. As part of the preliminary minesweeping group, Jeffers arrived Okinawa 24 Mareh, 1 week before the landings, and began clearing mines and marking boat lanes. During the assault 1 April the ship moved to antisubmarine screening and air defense. During the great Japanese air attack of 6 April she downed twin-engine bomber. Six days later, while on radar picket station, she agahl was under heavy air attack. She downed at least one of the attackers and was nearly hit by one of the deadly Baka bombs as the attack was repulsed. Jelters then assisted survivors of sunken lan' nert T. Abele.

The veteran ship steamed into Rerama Retto to repair battle damage later that afternoon, emerging 16 April to join a carrier group operating off Okinawa in support of ground forces. She then sailed to Guam 3 May for further repairs. Departing again 26 June, Jeffers sailed via Siapan and Ulithi to Rerama Retto, and spent the next fi weeks on minesweeping operations north of Okinav.-a. She w as at anchor off Okinawa when the news of the Japanese acceptance of terms was received 15 August 1915.

Jeffers steamed into Tokyo Bay 29 August with occupation forces, and was present for the surrender ceremonies 2 September. She then joined a minesweeping group for vital sweeping operations around Japan, including hazardous operations in Tsushima Strait. Operating out of Sasebo, she continued to sweep in the Yellow Sea during November, getting underway 5 December for the United States.

Jeffers arrived San Diego 23 December and steamed via the Panama Canal to Norfolk, where she arrived 9 January 1946. The ship then began her peacetime duty, arriving Charleston 12 June. She remained there for the rest of 1946 except for a short training cruise to Casco Bay. 1947 was spent on maneuvers in the Caribbean during April and May, followed by exercises on the East Coast of the United States, and 1948 was spent entirely at various East Coast ports on training duty.

After making a short cruise to the Caribbean in early 1949, Jeffers sailed 6 September from Charleston for her flrst Mediterranean cruise. This was the period of unrest in Greece and Israel, and the ship took part in maneuvers around Malta until October, as America showed her might in the cause of peace and stability. She returned to Charleston 13 October.

The next year was spent at Charleston, except for a training cruise to Guantanamo Bay in March. She got underway again, however, 9 January 1951 for another cruise to the troubled Mediterranean. She visited Oran, Palermo, Athens, and Naples during this deployment, again taking part in 6th Fleet's important peace-keeping operations. Arriving Charleston 17 May 1951, Jeffers engaged in minesweeping and antisubmarine exercises until her next scheduled Mediterranean cruise, 5 June 1952. She operated with 6th Fleet carriers and destroyers until returning to her home port 13 October.

Jeffers spent the first half of 1953 in training off the Virginia Capes, departing Norfolk 16 September for operations with carrier 13ennington and units of the Royal Canadian Navy in the Mediterranean. She returned to Charleston 3 February 1954. Operations from New York to Key West and IIavana occupied the veteran destroyerminesweeper until she decommissioned at Charleston 23 May 1955. She entered the Charleston Group, Atlantic Reserve Fleet as DD-621, having been reclassified 15 January 1955. Jeffers is at present berthed at Orange, Tex.

Jeffers received seven battle stars for World War II service.


Jeffers DD- 621 - History

(DD-621: dp.1,630 l. 348'4" b. 36'1" dr. 17'5", s. 35 k. cpl. 270 a. 4 5", 4 40mm., 5 20mm., 5 21" tt., 6 dcp., 2 dct. cl. Gleaves.)

Jeffers (DD-621) was laid down by Federal shipbuilding & Drydock Co., Kearny, N.J., 25 March 1942 launched 26 August 1942 sponsored by Mrs. Lucie Jeffers Lyons great- granddaughter of Commodore Jeffers and commissioned 5 November 1942, Lt. Comdr. W. G. McGarry in command.

After shakedown and training in Casco Bay, Maine Jeffers operated briefly on the East Coast until departing Norfolk 18 February 1943 on her first transatlantic voyage escorting a convoy to Casablanca and returning 14 April.. The ship patrolled off Argentia, Newfoundland, for a week before steaming to Norfolk to prepare for the coming invasion of Sicily.

Jeffers sailed from Norfolk 8 June with Task Force 65 and arrived Oran, Algeria, 22 June. While preparing for the giant assault, she patrolled off other African ports shooting down a German bomber during 6 July Luftwaffe raid on Bizerte. Jeffers sailed 2 days later with Rear Admiral Hall's force for Gela and, upon arrival 9 June she guarded the transports. Early next day the great assault began, with Jeffers assigned the task of shooting out shore searchlights and providing fire support. As the landing proceeded with great success in the following days the ship fired support missions and served on antisubmarine patrol. She sailed to Bizerte 18 July, but was back at Palermo 31 July with cargo ships. Jeffers sailed to Oran the next day, and from that port continued to New York, arriving 22 August.

After repairs at New York, the destroyer was assigned to convoy duty between East Coast ports and Scotland. As the Allies began the great buildup of men and materiel in Britain for the landings in northern France, Jeffers made five voyages between 5 September 1943 and 22 April 1944. On her second convoy crossing to Scotland, 21 October the ship picked up survivors from Murphy, after that destroyer had been cut in two by a tanker. She also took part in salvage operations which saved the stern of the stricken vessel.

After training operations, Jeffers sailed from New York 5 May 1944 for the United Kingdom, where she prepared for the invasion of Normandy in June. She departed Belfast 3 June for Utah Beach, where she patrolled and provided fire support as troops stormed ashore on D-day. The veteran destroyer remained off the beach until 29 June, driving off several enemy planes and assisting damaged ships. For the next two weeks she convoyed transports from Belfast to Utah Beach as more troops and supplies were poured in to the beachhead, finally departing for the Mediterranean 16 July.

Next on the Allied timetable for the defeat of Germany was another invasion of France, this one in the south. Assigned to screen escort carriers covering the operation, Jeffers departed Malta 12 August to join her task group. Three days later, as troops landed between Cannes and Toulon, the ship remained with supporting carriers, continuing to cruise off shore until 28 September. She then sailed for New York, arriving 7 October to prepare for duty in the far Pacific.

Jeffers was converted to a destroyer-minesweeper at New York, and was reclassified DMS-27 on 15 November, She sailed 3 January 1945 for the Panama Canal and California, arriving San Diego for training 17 January. In February she moved on to Pearl Harbor and from there to the great advance base at Ulithi to prepare for the Okinawa invasion, last and largest amphibious operation of the war against Japan. As part of the preliminary minesweeping group, Jeffers arrived Okinawa 24 March, 1 week before the landings, and began clearing mines and marking boat lanes. During the assault 1 April the ship moved to antisubmarine screening and air defense. During the great Japanese air attack of 6 April she downed a twin-engine bomber. Six days later, while on radar picket station, she again was under heavy air attack. She downed at least one of the attackers and was nearly hit by one of the deadly Baka bombs as the attack was repulsed. Jeffers then assisted survivors of sunken Mannert T. Abele.

The veteran ship steamed into Kerama Retto to repair battle damage later that afternoon, emerging 16 April to join a carrier group operating off: Okinawa in support of ground forces. She then sailed to Guam 3 May for further repairs. Departing again 26 June, Jeffers sailed via Saipan and Ulithi to Kerama Retto, and spent the next 6 weeks on minesweeping operations north of Okinawa. She was at anchor off Okinawa when the news of the Japanese acceptance of terms was received 15 August 1945.

Jeffers steamed into Tokyo Bay 29 August with occupation forces, and was present for the surrender ceremonies 2 September. She then joined a minesweeping group for vital sweeping operations around Japan, including hazardous operations in Tsushima Strait. Operating out of Sasebo, she continued to sweep in the Yellow Sea during November, getting underway 5 December for the United States.

Jeffers arrived San Diego 23 December and steamed via the Panama Canal to Norfolk, where she arrived 9 January 1946. The ship then began her peacetime duty, arriving Charleston 12 June. She remained there for the rest of 1946 except for a short training cruise to Casco Bay. 1947 was spent on maneuvers in the Caribbean during April and May, followed by exercises on the East Coast of the United States and 1948 was spent entirely at various Fast Coast ports on training duty.

After making a short cruise to the Caribbean in early 1949, Jeffers sailed 6 September from Charleston for her first Mediterranean cruise. This was the period of unrest in Greece and Israel, and the ship took part in maneuvers around Malta until October, as America showed her might in the cause of peace and stability. She returned to Charleston 13 October.

The next year was spent at Charleston, except for a training cruise to Guantanamo Bay in March. She got underway again, however, 9 January 1951 for another cruise to the troubled Mediterranean. She visited Oran, Palermo, Athens, and Naples during this deployment, again taking part in 6th Fleet's important peace-keeping operations. Arriving Charleston 17 May 1951, Jeffers engaged in minesweeping and antisubmarine exercises until her next scheduled Mediterranean cruise, 5 June 1952. She operated with 6th Fleet carriers and destroyers until returning to her home port 13 October.

Jeffers spent the first half of 1953 in training off the Virginia Capes, departing Norfolk 16 September for operations with carrier Bennington and units of the Royal Canadian Navy in the Mediterranean. She returned to Charleston 3 February 1954. Operations from New York to Key West and Havana occupied the veteran destroyer minesweeper until she decommissioned at Charleston 23 May 1955. She entered the Charleston Group, Atlantic Reserve Fleet as DD-621, having been reclassified 15 January 1955. Jeffers is at present berthed at Orange, Tex.


Jeffers DD- 621 - History

USS Jeffers , a 1630-ton Gleaves class destroyer built at Kearny, New Jersey, was commissioned in November 1942. She escorted a convoy to Morocco in February-April 1943, briefly patrolled off Newfoundland, then recrossed the Atlantic in June to join the forces preparing to invade Italy. During the Sicily campaign in July and early August she provided gunfire support and anti-submarine escort services. Jeffers returned to the U.S. in August 1943 and was thereafter mainly employed as a trans-Atlantic convoy escort.

In June 1944 Jeffers participated in the invasion of Normandy, operating off "Utah" Beach as a fire support ship and escort. She next went to the Mediterranean to take part in the Southern France campaign during August and September. Converted to a high speed minesweeper after the conclusion of that operation, she was redesignated DMS-27 in November 1944.

Jeffers went to the Pacific in January 1945 and, beginning in late March, was an active participant in the brutal fight to capture Okinawa. She initially performed minesweeping duties in advance of the landings, then undertook anti-submarine and radar picket work, including helping to defend against Japanese suicide planes during April. Jeffers spent the last weeks of the Pacific War sweeping mines north of Okinawa. She was present in Tokyo Bay on 2 September 1945, when Japan formally surrendered, and took part in mine clearance operations off Japan and China for most of the rest of the year.

Returning to the U.S. in December 1945, Jeffers steamed to the Atlantic Coast in early 1946. She served in the western Atlantic and Caribbean for the next nine years, and also deployed four times to the Mediterranean sea between September 1949 and early 1954. Jeffers reverted to destroyer status in January 1955, again being designated DD-621, and was decommissioned in May of that year. After more than a decade and a half in the Atlantic Reserve Fleet, she was stricken from the Naval Vessel Register in July 1971 and sold for scrapping in May 1973.

USS Jeffers was named in honor of Commodore William N. Jeffers, USN, (1824-1883), who was briefly Commanding Officer of USS Monitor in 1862 and was later Chief of the Bureau of Ordnance.

This page features the only view we have concerning USS Jeffers (DD-621, later DMS-27 and DD-621).

If you want higher resolution reproductions than the digital images presented here, see: "How to Obtain Photographic Reproductions."

Click on the small photograph to prompt a larger view of the same image.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the National Archives.

Online Image: 124KB 740 x 615 pixels

Reproductions of this image may also be available through the National Archives photographic reproduction system.

In addition to the view referenced above, the National Archives appears to hold at least one other photograph of USS Jeffers (DMS-27, previously and later DD-621). The following listing describes this image:

The image listed below is NOT in the Naval Historical Center's collections.
DO NOT try to obtain it using the procedures described in our page "How to Obtain Photographic Reproductions".

Reproductions of this image should be available through the National Archives photographic reproduction system for pictures not held by the Naval Historical Center.


DD-621 Jeffers

Jeffers (DD-621) was laid down by Federal shipbuilding & Drydock Co., Kearny, N.J., 25 March 1942 launched 26 August 1942 sponsored by Mrs. Lucie Jeffers Lyons great- granddaughter of Commodore Jeffers and commissioned 5 November 1942, Lt. Comdr. W. G. McGarry in command.

After shakedown and training in Casco Bay, Maine Jeffers operated briefly on the East Coast until departing Norfolk 18 February 1943 on her first transatlantic voyage escorting a convoy to Casablanca and returning 14 April.. The ship patrolled off Argentia, Newfoundland, for a week before steaming to Norfolk to prepare for the coming invasion of Sicily.

Jeffers sailed from Norfolk 8 June with Task Force 65 and arrived Oran, Algeria, 22 June. While preparing for the giant assault, she patrolled off other African ports shooting down a German bomber during 6 July Luftwaffe raid on Bizerte. Jeffers sailed 2 days later with Rear Admiral Hall's force for Gela and, upon arrival 9 June she guarded the transports. Early next day the great assault began, with Jeffers assigned the task of shooting out shore searchlights and providing fire support. As the landing proceeded with great success in the following days the ship fired support missions and served on antisubmarine patrol. She sailed to Bizerte 18 July, but was back at Palermo 31 July with cargo ships. Jeffers sailed to Oran the next day, and from that port continued to New York, arriving 22 August.

After repairs at New York, the destroyer was assigned to convoy duty between East Coast ports and Scotland. As the Allies began the great buildup of men and materiel in Britain for the landings in northern France, Jeffers made five voyages between 5 September 1943 and 22 April 1944. On her second convoy crossing to Scotland, 21 October the ship picked up survivors from Murphy, after that destroyer had been cut in two by a tanker. She also took part in salvage operations which saved the stern of the stricken vessel.

After training operations, Jeffers sailed from New York 5 May 1944 for the United Kingdom, where she prepared for the invasion of Normandy in June. She departed Belfast 3 June for Utah Beach, where she patrolled and provided fire support as troops stormed ashore on D-day. The veteran destroyer remained off the beach until 29 June, driving off several enemy planes and assisting damaged ships. For the next two weeks she convoyed transports from Belfast to Utah Beach as more troops and supplies were poured in to the beachhead, finally departing for the Mediterranean 16 July.

Next on the Allied timetable for the defeat of Germany was another invasion of France, this one in the south. Assigned to screen escort carriers covering the operation, Jeffers departed Malta 12 August to join her task group. Three days later, as troops landed between Cannes and Toulon, the ship remained with supporting carriers, continuing to cruise off shore until 28 September. She then sailed for New York, arriving 7 October to prepare for duty in the far Pacific.

Jeffers was converted to a destroyer-minesweeper at New York, and was reclassified DMS-27 on 15 November, She sailed 3 January 1945 for the Panama Canal and California, arriving San Diego for training 17 January. In February she moved on to Pearl Harbor and from there to the great advance base at Ulithi to prepare for the Okinawa invasion, last and largest amphibious operation of the war against Japan. As part of the preliminary minesweeping group, Jeffers arrived Okinawa 24 March, 1 week before the landings, and began clearing mines and marking boat lanes. During the assault 1 April the ship moved to antisubmarine screening and air defense. During the great Japanese air attack of 6 April she downed a twin-engine bomber. Six days later, while on radar picket station, she again was under heavy air attack. She downed at least one of the attackers and was nearly hit by one of the deadly Baka bombs as the attack was repulsed. Jeffers then assisted survivors of sunken Mannert T. Abele.

The veteran ship steamed into Kerama Retto to repair battle damage later that afternoon, emerging 16 April to join a carrier group operating off: Okinawa in support of ground forces. She then sailed to Guam 3 May for further repairs. Departing again 26 June, Jeffers sailed via Saipan and Ulithi to Kerama Retto, and spent the next 6 weeks on minesweeping operations north of Okinawa. She was at anchor off Okinawa when the news of the Japanese acceptance of terms was received 15 August 1945.

Jeffers steamed into Tokyo Bay 29 August with occupation forces, and was present for the surrender ceremonies 2 September. She then joined a minesweeping group for vital sweeping operations around Japan, including hazardous operations in Tsushima Strait. Operating out of Sasebo, she continued to sweep in the Yellow Sea during November, getting underway 5 December for the United States.

Jeffers arrived San Diego 23 December and steamed via the Panama Canal to Norfolk, where she arrived 9 January 1946. The ship then began her peacetime duty, arriving Charleston 12 June. She remained there for the rest of 1946 except for a short training cruise to Casco Bay. 1947 was spent on maneuvers in the Caribbean during April and May, followed by exercises on the East Coast of the United States and 1948 was spent entirely at various Fast Coast ports on training duty.

After making a short cruise to the Caribbean in early 1949, Jeffers sailed 6 September from Charleston for her first Mediterranean cruise. This was the period of unrest in Greece and Israel, and the ship took part in maneuvers around Malta until October, as America showed her might in the cause of peace and stability. She returned to Charleston 13 October.

The next year was spent at Charleston, except for a training cruise to Guantanamo Bay in March. She got underway again, however, 9 January 1951 for another cruise to the troubled Mediterranean. She visited Oran, Palermo, Athens, and Naples during this deployment, again taking part in 6th Fleet's important peace-keeping operations. Arriving Charleston 17 May 1951, Jeffers engaged in minesweeping and antisubmarine exercises until her next scheduled Mediterranean cruise, 5 June 1952. She operated with 6th Fleet carriers and destroyers until returning to her home port 13 October.

Jeffers spent the first half of 1953 in training off the Virginia Capes, departing Norfolk 16 September for operations with carrier Bennington and units of the Royal Canadian Navy in the Mediterranean. She returned to Charleston 3 February 1954. Operations from New York to Key West and Havana occupied the veteran destroyer minesweeper until she decommissioned at Charleston 23 May 1955. She entered the Charleston Group, Atlantic Reserve Fleet as DD-621, having been reclassified 15 January 1955.


USS Jeffers DD-621 (1942-1971)

Request a FREE packet and get the best information and resources on mesothelioma delivered to you overnight.

All Content is copyright 2021 | About Us

Attorney Advertising. This website is sponsored by Seeger Weiss LLP with offices in New York, New Jersey and Philadelphia. The principal address and telephone number of the firm are 55 Challenger Road, Ridgefield Park, New Jersey, (973) 639-9100. The information on this website is provided for informational purposes only and is not intended to provide specific legal or medical advice. Do not stop taking a prescribed medication without first consulting with your doctor. Discontinuing a prescribed medication without your doctor’s advice can result in injury or death. Prior results of Seeger Weiss LLP or its attorneys do not guarantee or predict a similar outcome with respect to any future matter. If you are a legal copyright holder and believe a page on this site falls outside the boundaries of "Fair Use" and infringes on your client’s copyright, we can be contacted regarding copyright matters at [email protected]


Đại Tây Dương và Địa Trung Hải [ sửa | sửa mã nguồn ]

Sau khi hoàn tất chạy thử máy và huấn luyện ngoài khơi Casco Bay, Maine, Jeffers hoạt động một thời gian ngắn tại vùng bờ Đông, cho đến khi nó khởi hành từ Norfolk vào ngày 18 tháng 2 năm 1943 cho chuyến vượt Đại Tây Dương đầu tiên hộ tống một đoàn tàu vận tải đi Casablanca]], quay trở về vào ngày 14 tháng 4. Nó tuần tra ngoài khơi Argentia, Newfoundland trong một tuần lễ trước khi lên đường đi Norfolk, nhằm chuẩn bị để tham gia Chiến dịch Husky, cuộc đổ bộ của lực lượng Đồng Minh lên Sicily, Ý.

Jeffers lên đường từ Norfolk cùng Lực lượng Đặc nhiệm 65 vào ngày 8 tháng 6, đi đến Oran, Algérie vào ngày 22 tháng 6. Trong khi chuẩn bị cho cuộc đổ bộ sắp diễn ra, nó tuần tra ngoài khơi các cảng Bắc Phi, bắn rơi một máy bay ném bom đối phương khi Không quân Đức tấn công Bizerte vào ngày 6 tháng 7. Nó khởi hành hai ngày sau đó cùng lực lượng dưới quyền Chuẩn đô đốc John L. Hall để đi Gela và sau khi đến nơi vào ngày 9 tháng 6 đã hộ tống bảo vệ các tàu vận tải. Sáng sớm ngày hôm sau khi cuộc đổ bộ bắt đầu, chiếc tàu khu trục được phân công phá hủy các đèn pha bờ biển đối phương và bắn pháo hỗ trợ cho Trận đổ bộ Gela. Khi chiến dịch diễn tiến thuận lợi trong những ngày tiếp theo, nó tiếp tục bắn pháo hỗ trợ và tuần tra chống tàu ngầm. Nó lên đường quay về Bizerte vào ngày 18 tháng 7, để rồi quay trở lại Palermo vào ngày 31 tháng 7 cùng các tàu chở hàng. Nó lên đường đi vào ngày hôm sau, và từ cảng này quay trở về Hoa Kỳ, về đến New York vào ngày 22 tháng 8.

Sau khi được sửa chữa, Jeffers được phân nhiệm vụ hộ tống vận tải đi lại giữa vùng bờ Đông và Scotland. Khi phía Đồng Minh bắt đầu tích lũy lực lượng và phương tiện tại Anh cho cuộc đổ bộ lên miền Bắc nước Pháp, nó thực hiện thêm năm chuyến đi hộ tống vận tải từ ngày 5 tháng 9 năm 1943 đến ngày 22 tháng 4 năm 1944. Trong chuyến đi thứ hai vượt đại dương đến Scotland vào ngày 21 tháng 10, nó cứu vớt những người sống sót từ chiếc Murphy, sau khi chiếc tàu khu trục bị cắt làm đôi do tai nạn va chạm với một tàu chở dầu. Nó cũng tham gia những hoạt động cứu hộ nhằm giữ lại phần đuôi của con tàu bị nạn.

Sau các hoạt động huấn luyện, Jeffers khởi hành từ New York vào ngày 5 tháng 5 để đi sang Anh, nơi nó chuẩn bị cho Chiến dịch Overlord, cuộc Đổ bộ Normandy vào tháng 6. Nó khởi hành từ Belfast, Bắc Ireland vào ngày 3 tháng 6 hướng đến bãi Utah, nơi nó tuần tra và bắn pháo hỗ trợ khi binh lính đổ bộ lên bờ vào ngày D 6 tháng 6. Nó ở lại ngoài khơi bãi đổ bộ cho đến ngày 29 tháng 6, đánh trả nhiều cuộc không kích của máy bay đối phương và trợ giúp cho những tàu bị hư hại. Trong hai tuần lễ tiếp theo, nó hộ tống các đoàn tàu từ Belfast đến bãi Utah khi có thêm nhiều binh lính tăng viện và hàng hóa tiếp liệu được đổ sang mặt trận, cho đến khi lên đường đi sang khu vực Địa Trung Hải vào ngày 16 tháng 7.

Kế hoạch tiếp theo của Đồng Minh nhằm đánh bại Đức Quốc xã là một cuộc đổ bộ khác lên nước Pháp, lần này ở phía Nam. Được phân công bảo vệ các tàu sân bay hộ tống hỗ trợ cho chiến dịch, Jeffers rời Malta vào ngày 12 tháng 8 để tham gia đội đặc nhiệm của nó. Ba ngày sau, khi binh lính đổ bộ lên khu vực giữa Cannes và Toulon, con tàu ở lại cùng các tàu sân bay hỗ trợ, tiếp tục tuần tra ngoài khơi cho đến ngày 28 tháng 9. Nó sau đó lên đường đi New York, đến nơi vào ngày 7 tháng 10, và chuẩn bị để nhận nhiệm vụ tại Mặt trận Thái Bình Dương.

Thái Bình Dương [ sửa | sửa mã nguồn ]

Jeffers được cải biến thành một tàu khu trục quét mìn tại New York, và được xếp lại lớp với ký hiệu lườn mới 'DMS-27 vào ngày 15 tháng 11. Nó lên đường vào ngày 3 tháng 1 năm 1945, đi ngang kênh đào Panama và California, đi đến San Diego để huấn luyện vào ngày 17 tháng 1. Sang tháng 2, nó tiếp tục đi đến Trân Châu Cảng, và từ đây đi đến căn cứ tiền phương Ulithi chuẩn bị cho cuộc đổ bộ lên Okinawa, chiến dịch đổ bộ lớn nhất và cuối cùng trong cuộc chiến tranh chống Nhật. Như một phần của đội quét mìn chuẩn bị, nó đi đến ngoài khơi Okinawa vào ngày 24 tháng 3, một tuần trước cuộc đổ bộ, bắt đầu quét mìn và đánh dấu các luồng ra vào bãi. Trong cuộc tấn công vào ngày 1 tháng 4, nó đảm trách tuần tra chống tàu ngầm và phòng không và khi Nhật Bản tung ra cuộc không kích quy mô lớn vào ngày 6 tháng 4, nó đã bắn rơi một máy bay ném bom hai động cơ. Sáu ngày sau, đang khi làm nhiệm vụ cột mốc radar, nó lại chịu đựng không kích dữ dội, bắn rơi ít nhất một máy bay tấn công và suýt bị một máy bay cảm tử Yokosuka MXY-7 Ohka đâm trúng khi cuộc tấn công bị đẩy lui. Nó sau đó trợ giúp những người sống sót của chiếc tàu khu trục Mannert L. Abele bị đánh chìm.

Jeffers đi đến Kerama Retto để sửa chữa những hư hại trong chiến đấu vào xế chiều hôm đó, để rồi lên đường vào ngày 16 tháng 4, tham gia một đội tàu sân bay hoạt động ngoài khơi Okinawa để hỗ trợ cho lực lượng trên bờ. Nó sau đó lên đường đi Guam vào ngày 3 tháng 5 để tiếp tục sửa chữa. Khởi hành vào ngày 26 tháng 6, nó đi ngang qua Saipan và Ulithi để đến Kerama Retto, trải qua sáu tuần lễ tiếp theo trong các hoạt động quét mìn về phía Bắc Okinawa. Nó đang thả neo ngoài khơi Okinawa khi nhận được tin tức về việc Nhật Bản chấp nhận đầu hàng vào ngày 15 tháng 8.

Jeffers đi đến vịnh Tokyo vào ngày 29 tháng 8 cùng lực lượng chiếm đóng, và đã có mặt tại đây khi diễn ra nghi thức đầu hàng trên thiết giáp hạm Missouri vào ngày 2 tháng 9. Nó sau đó tham gia một đội quét mìn cho các hoạt động quét mìn cần thiết chung quanh Nhật Bản, bao gồm những hoạt động nguy hiểm tại eo biển Tsushima. Hoạt động từ căn cứ tại Sasebo, nó tiếp tục quét mìn tại Hoàng Hải trong tháng 11, trước khi lên đường quay trở về Hoa Kỳ vào ngày 5 tháng 12.

1946 – 1955 [ sửa | sửa mã nguồn ]

Jeffers về đến San Diego vào ngày 23 tháng 12, rồi băng qua kênh đào Panama và đi đến Norfolk vào ngày 9 tháng 1 năm 1946. Nó bắt đầu làm những nhiệm vụ thường lệ thời bình, đi đến Charleston, South Carolina vào ngày 12 tháng 6, và ở lại đây cho đến hết năm 1946 ngoại trừ một chuyến đi ngắn đến Casco Bay. Trong năm 1947, nó cơ động tại vùng biển Caribe trong tháng 4 và tháng 5, tiếp nối bởi các cuộc thực tập dọc bờ Đông Hoa Kỳ và sang năm 1948 nó đi đến nhiều cảng tại bờ Đông trong nhiệm vụ huấn luyện.

Sau khi thực hiện một chuyến đi ngắn đến vùng biển Caribe vào đầu năm 1949, Jeffers khởi hành từ Charleston cho lượt bố trí đầu tiên sang Địa Trung Hải sau chiến tranh vào ngày 6 tháng 9, trong một bối cảnh mất ổn định tại Hy Lạp và Israel. Con tàu tham gia các cuộc cơ động chung quanh Malta cho đến tháng 10, khi Hải quân Hoa Kỳ phô trương lực lượng nhằm duy trì hòa bình và ổn định, và quay trở về Charleston vào ngày 13 tháng 10. Sang năm sau, nó hoạt động chủ yếu từ Charleston, ngoại trừ một chuyến đi huấn luyện đến vịnh Guantánamo, Cuba trong tháng 3. Tuy nhiên, nó lại lên đường vào ngày 9 tháng 1 năm 1951 cho một chuyến khác sang khu vực Địa Trung Hải đầy bất trắc, viếng thăm Oran, Palermo, Athens và Naples trong đợt này, và tham gia cùng các hoạt động gìn giữ hoà bình của Đệ Lục hạm đội. Về đến Charleston vào ngày 17 tháng 5, nó tham gia các cuộc thực tập quét mìn và chống tàu ngầm cho đến khi thực hiện lượt phục vụ thứ ba tại Địa Trung Hải vào ngày 5 tháng 6 năm 1952. Nó hoạt động cùng các tàu sân bay và tàu khu trục của Đệ Lục hạm đội cho đến khi quay trở về cảng nhà vào ngày 13 tháng 10.

Jeffers trải qua nữa đầu năm 1953 hoạt động huấn luyện ngoài khơi Virginia Capes, rồi khởi hành từ Norfolk vào ngày 16 tháng 9 để hoạt động cùng tàu sân bay Bennington và các đơn vị Hải quân Hoàng gia Canada tại Địa Trung Hải. Nó quay trở về Charleston vào ngày 3 tháng 2 năm 1954, và hoạt động trong khu vực từ New York đến Key West và Havana, cho đến khi nó được cho xuất biên chế tại Charleston vào ngày 23 tháng 5 năm 1955. Nó nằm trong thành phần Đội Charleston, Hạm đội Dự bị Đại Tây Dương, và được xếp lớp trở lại ký hiện lườn DD-621 vào ngày 15 tháng 1 năm 1955. Tên nó được cho rút khỏi danh sách Đăng bạ Hải quân vào ngày 1 tháng 7 năm 1971, và lườn tàu bị bán để tháo dỡ vào ngày 25 tháng 5 năm 1973.


Further Development and What Might Have Been

Range was the Ohka 11’s major shortcoming. The Ohka’s rocket engines gave it great speed at the expense of range. Kugisho developed the Ohka 22. The Ohka 22 used a hybrid motor-jet engine. The Ohka 22 range was 81 mils (130 km). It also had a smaller warhead, 1,323 lbs. (600 kgs). It was modified to fit the Yokosuka P1Y1 Ginga[i]. The Ginga was faster than the Mitsubishi G4M which carried the Ohka 11. Kugisho completed 50 Model 22 airframes and three engines before the war ended.[ii]

The Japanese were also developing launch ramps so they could launch the Ohkas from land to attack invading ships. The Japanese were preparing for the Allies invasion of the home islands. The Japanese military believed if they caused enough allied casualties in the initial invasion the Allies would accept a negotiated settlement. While the Japanese Army’s plans seemed unrealistic, there is historical precedence before and after World War II. A combination of high casualties and a war’s long duration could mean political trouble in America, Japan’s main adversary. In any case an invasion of Japan’s main islands would have been costly to both sides.

The Allies planned to invade the Kyushu Island in November 1945. The Allies planned to invade Honshu Island in the Spring of 1946. The Japanese military hoped to have 10,000 aircraft available for the Allied invasion. Almost all of these aircraft were going to fly kamikaze missions.[iii] The primary targets for the Kamikazes were going to be the transport ships. This means the smaller warhead of the Ohka 22 would be adequate for the task.

How many Ohkas would have been available for the invasions? How well would the Ohka 11 and Ohka 22 have performed? Thankfully these questions, and questions about how the allied invasion of Japan would have played out, is in the realm of alternate history.

[i] On April 2, 1945 a Yokosuka P1Y Ginga kamikaze struck the attack transport USS Henrico (APA-45). The attack killed the ship’s captain, Captain William C. France, and 48 others, including 14 soldiers. Many more were wounded. Henrico.org, Kamikaze Memorial, http://henricoapa45.org/kamikaze-memorial/, last accessed 10/19/19.

[ii] Smithsonian Air & Space Museum, Kugisho MXY7 Ohka (Cherry Blossom) 22, https://airandspace.si.edu/collection-objects/kugisho-mxy7-ohka-cherry-blossom-22, last accessed 10/19/19.

[iii] Operation Olympic.com, Japanese Defenses, http://www.operationolympic.com/p1_defenses.php, last accessed 10/19/19.

This content is accurate and true to the best of the author’s knowledge and is not meant to substitute for formal and individualized advice from a qualified professional.

© 2019 Robert Sacchi


USS JEFFERS DD-621 Framed Navy Ship Display

This is a beautiful ship display commemorating the USS JEFFERS (DD-621). The artwork depicts the USS JEFFERS in all her glory. More than just an artistic concept of the ship, this display includes a custom designed ship crest plaque and an engraved ship statistics plaque. This product is richly finished with custom cut and sized double mats and framed with a high quality black frame. Only the best materials are used to complete our ship displays. Navy Emporium Ship Displays make a generous and personal gift for any Navy sailor.

  • Custom designed and expertly engraved Navy crest positioned on fine black felt
  • Artwork is 16 inches X 7 inches on heavyweight matte
  • Engraved plaque stating the ship vital statistics
  • Enclosed in a high quality 20 inch X 16 inch black frame
  • Choice of matting color options

PLEASE VIEW OUR OTHER GREAT USS JEFFERS DD-621 INFORMATION:
USS Jeffers DD-621 Guestbook Forum


Mục lục

Jeffers được chế tạo tại xưởng tàu của hãng Federal Shipbuilding and Drydock Company ở Kearny, New Jersey. Nó được đặt lườn vào ngày 25 tháng 3 năm 1942 được hạ thủy vào ngày 26 tháng 8 năm 1942, và được đỡ đầu bởi bà Lucie Jeffers Lyons, chắt của Thiếu tướng Jeffers. Con tàu được cho nhập biên chế cùng Hải quân Hoa Kỳ vào ngày 5 tháng 11 năm 1942 dưới quyền chỉ huy của Thiếu tá Hải quânW. G. McGarry.

Đại Tây Dương và Địa Trung Hải Sửa đổi

Sau khi hoàn tất chạy thử máy và huấn luyện ngoài khơi Casco Bay, Maine, Jeffers hoạt động một thời gian ngắn tại vùng bờ Đông, cho đến khi nó khởi hành từ Norfolk vào ngày 18 tháng 2 năm 1943 cho chuyến vượt Đại Tây Dương đầu tiên hộ tống một đoàn tàu vận tải đi Casablanca]], quay trở về vào ngày 14 tháng 4. Nó tuần tra ngoài khơi Argentia, Newfoundland trong một tuần lễ trước khi lên đường đi Norfolk, nhằm chuẩn bị để tham gia Chiến dịch Husky, cuộc đổ bộ của lực lượng Đồng Minh lên Sicily, Ý.

Jeffers lên đường từ Norfolk cùng Lực lượng Đặc nhiệm 65 vào ngày 8 tháng 6, đi đến Oran, Algérie vào ngày 22 tháng 6. Trong khi chuẩn bị cho cuộc đổ bộ sắp diễn ra, nó tuần tra ngoài khơi các cảng Bắc Phi, bắn rơi một máy bay ném bom đối phương khi Không quân Đức tấn công Bizerte vào ngày 6 tháng 7. Nó khởi hành hai ngày sau đó cùng lực lượng dưới quyền Chuẩn đô đốc John L. Hall để đi Gela và sau khi đến nơi vào ngày 9 tháng 6 đã hộ tống bảo vệ các tàu vận tải. Sáng sớm ngày hôm sau khi cuộc đổ bộ bắt đầu, chiếc tàu khu trục được phân công phá hủy các đèn pha bờ biển đối phương và bắn pháo hỗ trợ cho Trận đổ bộ Gela. Khi chiến dịch diễn tiến thuận lợi trong những ngày tiếp theo, nó tiếp tục bắn pháo hỗ trợ và tuần tra chống tàu ngầm. Nó lên đường quay về Bizerte vào ngày 18 tháng 7, để rồi quay trở lại Palermo vào ngày 31 tháng 7 cùng các tàu chở hàng. Nó lên đường đi vào ngày hôm sau, và từ cảng này quay trở về Hoa Kỳ, về đến New York vào ngày 22 tháng 8.

Sau khi được sửa chữa, Jeffers được phân nhiệm vụ hộ tống vận tải đi lại giữa vùng bờ Đông và Scotland. Khi phía Đồng Minh bắt đầu tích lũy lực lượng và phương tiện tại Anh cho cuộc đổ bộ lên miền Bắc nước Pháp, nó thực hiện thêm năm chuyến đi hộ tống vận tải từ ngày 5 tháng 9 năm 1943 đến ngày 22 tháng 4 năm 1944. Trong chuyến đi thứ hai vượt đại dương đến Scotland vào ngày 21 tháng 10, nó cứu vớt những người sống sót từ chiếc Murphy, sau khi chiếc tàu khu trục bị cắt làm đôi do tai nạn va chạm với một tàu chở dầu. Nó cũng tham gia những hoạt động cứu hộ nhằm giữ lại phần đuôi của con tàu bị nạn.

Sau các hoạt động huấn luyện, Jeffers khởi hành từ New York vào ngày 5 tháng 5 để đi sang Anh, nơi nó chuẩn bị cho Chiến dịch Overlord, cuộc Đổ bộ Normandy vào tháng 6. Nó khởi hành từ Belfast, Bắc Ireland vào ngày 3 tháng 6 hướng đến bãi Utah, nơi nó tuần tra và bắn pháo hỗ trợ khi binh lính đổ bộ lên bờ vào ngày D 6 tháng 6. Nó ở lại ngoài khơi bãi đổ bộ cho đến ngày 29 tháng 6, đánh trả nhiều cuộc không kích của máy bay đối phương và trợ giúp cho những tàu bị hư hại. Trong hai tuần lễ tiếp theo, nó hộ tống các đoàn tàu từ Belfast đến bãi Utah khi có thêm nhiều binh lính tăng viện và hàng hóa tiếp liệu được đổ sang mặt trận, cho đến khi lên đường đi sang khu vực Địa Trung Hải vào ngày 16 tháng 7.

Kế hoạch tiếp theo của Đồng Minh nhằm đánh bại Đức Quốc xã là một cuộc đổ bộ khác lên nước Pháp, lần này ở phía Nam. Được phân công bảo vệ các tàu sân bay hộ tống hỗ trợ cho chiến dịch, Jeffers rời Malta vào ngày 12 tháng 8 để tham gia đội đặc nhiệm của nó. Ba ngày sau, khi binh lính đổ bộ lên khu vực giữa Cannes và Toulon, con tàu ở lại cùng các tàu sân bay hỗ trợ, tiếp tục tuần tra ngoài khơi cho đến ngày 28 tháng 9. Nó sau đó lên đường đi New York, đến nơi vào ngày 7 tháng 10, và chuẩn bị để nhận nhiệm vụ tại Mặt trận Thái Bình Dương.

Thái Bình Dương Sửa đổi

Jeffers được cải biến thành một tàu khu trục quét mìn tại New York, và được xếp lại lớp với ký hiệu lườn mới 'DMS-27 vào ngày 15 tháng 11. Nó lên đường vào ngày 3 tháng 1 năm 1945, đi ngang kênh đào Panama và California, đi đến San Diego để huấn luyện vào ngày 17 tháng 1. Sang tháng 2, nó tiếp tục đi đến Trân Châu Cảng, và từ đây đi đến căn cứ tiền phương Ulithi chuẩn bị cho cuộc đổ bộ lên Okinawa, chiến dịch đổ bộ lớn nhất và cuối cùng trong cuộc chiến tranh chống Nhật. Như một phần của đội quét mìn chuẩn bị, nó đi đến ngoài khơi Okinawa vào ngày 24 tháng 3, một tuần trước cuộc đổ bộ, bắt đầu quét mìn và đánh dấu các luồng ra vào bãi. Trong cuộc tấn công vào ngày 1 tháng 4, nó đảm trách tuần tra chống tàu ngầm và phòng không và khi Nhật Bản tung ra cuộc không kích quy mô lớn vào ngày 6 tháng 4, nó đã bắn rơi một máy bay ném bom hai động cơ. Sáu ngày sau, đang khi làm nhiệm vụ cột mốc radar, nó lại chịu đựng không kích dữ dội, bắn rơi ít nhất một máy bay tấn công và suýt bị một máy bay cảm tử Yokosuka MXY-7 Ohka đâm trúng khi cuộc tấn công bị đẩy lui. Nó sau đó trợ giúp những người sống sót của chiếc tàu khu trục Mannert L. Abele bị đánh chìm.

Jeffers đi đến Kerama Retto để sửa chữa những hư hại trong chiến đấu vào xế chiều hôm đó, để rồi lên đường vào ngày 16 tháng 4, tham gia một đội tàu sân bay hoạt động ngoài khơi Okinawa để hỗ trợ cho lực lượng trên bờ. Nó sau đó lên đường đi Guam vào ngày 3 tháng 5 để tiếp tục sửa chữa. Khởi hành vào ngày 26 tháng 6, nó đi ngang qua Saipan và Ulithi để đến Kerama Retto, trải qua sáu tuần lễ tiếp theo trong các hoạt động quét mìn về phía Bắc Okinawa. Nó đang thả neo ngoài khơi Okinawa khi nhận được tin tức về việc Nhật Bản chấp nhận đầu hàng vào ngày 15 tháng 8.

Jeffers đi đến vịnh Tokyo vào ngày 29 tháng 8 cùng lực lượng chiếm đóng, và đã có mặt tại đây khi diễn ra nghi thức đầu hàng trên thiết giáp hạm Missouri vào ngày 2 tháng 9. Nó sau đó tham gia một đội quét mìn cho các hoạt động quét mìn cần thiết chung quanh Nhật Bản, bao gồm những hoạt động nguy hiểm tại eo biển Tsushima. Hoạt động từ căn cứ tại Sasebo, nó tiếp tục quét mìn tại Hoàng Hải trong tháng 11, trước khi lên đường quay trở về Hoa Kỳ vào ngày 5 tháng 12.

1946 – 1955 Sửa đổi

Jeffers về đến San Diego vào ngày 23 tháng 12, rồi băng qua kênh đào Panama và đi đến Norfolk vào ngày 9 tháng 1 năm 1946. Nó bắt đầu làm những nhiệm vụ thường lệ thời bình, đi đến Charleston, South Carolina vào ngày 12 tháng 6, và ở lại đây cho đến hết năm 1946 ngoại trừ một chuyến đi ngắn đến Casco Bay. Trong năm 1947, nó cơ động tại vùng biển Caribe trong tháng 4 và tháng 5, tiếp nối bởi các cuộc thực tập dọc bờ Đông Hoa Kỳ và sang năm 1948 nó đi đến nhiều cảng tại bờ Đông trong nhiệm vụ huấn luyện.

Sau khi thực hiện một chuyến đi ngắn đến vùng biển Caribe vào đầu năm 1949, Jeffers khởi hành từ Charleston cho lượt bố trí đầu tiên sang Địa Trung Hải sau chiến tranh vào ngày 6 tháng 9, trong một bối cảnh mất ổn định tại Hy Lạp và Israel. Con tàu tham gia các cuộc cơ động chung quanh Malta cho đến tháng 10, khi Hải quân Hoa Kỳ phô trương lực lượng nhằm duy trì hòa bình và ổn định, và quay trở về Charleston vào ngày 13 tháng 10. Sang năm sau, nó hoạt động chủ yếu từ Charleston, ngoại trừ một chuyến đi huấn luyện đến vịnh Guantánamo, Cuba trong tháng 3. Tuy nhiên, nó lại lên đường vào ngày 9 tháng 1 năm 1951 cho một chuyến khác sang khu vực Địa Trung Hải đầy bất trắc, viếng thăm Oran, Palermo, Athens và Naples trong đợt này, và tham gia cùng các hoạt động gìn giữ hoà bình của Đệ Lục hạm đội. Về đến Charleston vào ngày 17 tháng 5, nó tham gia các cuộc thực tập quét mìn và chống tàu ngầm cho đến khi thực hiện lượt phục vụ thứ ba tại Địa Trung Hải vào ngày 5 tháng 6 năm 1952. Nó hoạt động cùng các tàu sân bay và tàu khu trục của Đệ Lục hạm đội cho đến khi quay trở về cảng nhà vào ngày 13 tháng 10.

Jeffers trải qua nữa đầu năm 1953 hoạt động huấn luyện ngoài khơi Virginia Capes, rồi khởi hành từ Norfolk vào ngày 16 tháng 9 để hoạt động cùng tàu sân bay Bennington và các đơn vị Hải quân Hoàng gia Canada tại Địa Trung Hải. Nó quay trở về Charleston vào ngày 3 tháng 2 năm 1954, và hoạt động trong khu vực từ New York đến Key West và Havana, cho đến khi nó được cho xuất biên chế tại Charleston vào ngày 23 tháng 5 năm 1955. Nó nằm trong thành phần Đội Charleston, Hạm đội Dự bị Đại Tây Dương, và được xếp lớp trở lại ký hiện lườn DD-621 vào ngày 15 tháng 1 năm 1955. Tên nó được cho rút khỏi danh sách Đăng bạ Hải quân vào ngày 1 tháng 7 năm 1971, và lườn tàu bị bán để tháo dỡ vào ngày 25 tháng 5 năm 1973.

Jeffers được tặng thưởng bảy Ngôi sao Chiến trận do thành tích phục vụ trong Thế Chiến II.


LESSON LEARNED


Psychology professor Samuel Renshaw developed a visual recognition system that proved effective in aircraft identification. (Ohio State University)

IN THE AFTERMATH of the friendly-fire mishap over Sicily, the U.S. Navy wondered why the destroyer USS Jeffers (DD-621) was one of the few ships to hold its fire when the American transport planes passed overhead. The answer pointed in a surprising direction: a middle-aged psychologist in Ohio.

Friendly fire had plagued the U.S. military since the first day of the war, when gunners in Hawaii shot down four F4F Wildcats flying to Hickam Field from the carrier USS Enterprise. The speed of modern warplanes and the stress of combat made it difficult for gunners to distinguish between Allied and enemy planes. The navy used the so-called WEFT system for aircraft recognition, which taught men to identify a plane by its component parts—Wing, Engine, Fuselage, Tail—akin to trying to read by examining each letter in a word. This system was cumbersome and inaccurate, leading sailors to grumble that WEFT really meant “Wrong Every [expletive] Time.”

Samuel Renshaw, a 50-year-old psychology professor at Ohio State University, thought he could help. He had developed a speed-reading method, and he believed his system would work for aircraft identification. In early 1942, he pitched his idea to U.S. Navy Lieutenant Howard Hamilton, a former Ohio State colleague. As an experiment, Renshaw taught his system to college students. When the students identified planes more accurately than naval personnel, the navy began sending small groups of officers to Ohio State that June to learn his system—but they still wondered whether Renshaw’s method would work in combat.

Renshaw emphasized “perception of total form.” Students learned to look at a warplane as a whole, rather than at its component parts, much the way reading is actually conducted—by recognizing a word instead of parsing every letter in that word. His main tool was the tachistoscope, a slide projector with a shutter that flashed images on a screen for increasingly shorter periods of time. Silhouettes of Allied and enemy planes were shown and, through repetition, students learned to identify a plane in 1/75th of a second.

In early 1943, Donald W. McClurg, a 25-year-old ensign, completed the Renshaw course and brought the system to the Jeffers. McClurg drilled the ship’s officers and crew on aircraft recognition every day from June 5, 1943, when he came aboard in Norfolk, Virginia, until July 9, 1943, when the Jeffers sailed the Mediterranean toward Sicily.

The Jeffers’s commander, William T. McGarry, was proud of his crew’s performance during the ill-fated air drop. “This ship did not take any friendly planes under fire during the period of this operation,” he wrote in his after-action report, noting that the Jeffers was one of the few ships whose crew had recognized the planes overhead as C-47s. He credited Ensign McClurg and his rigorous training program.

Vice Admiral H. Kent Hewitt, commander of Husky’s American naval forces, also took notice. “Ships which had on board graduates of the Renshaw School at Columbus, Ohio, reported excellent fire discipline,” he wrote in his official report soon after Sicily was secured. Hewitt recommended that each destroyer-class vessel or larger have a Renshaw-trained officer on board to teach the method to its crew. “Adequate instruction can never reach too many officers and men,” he reflected, and the army and navy adopted the Renshaw system.

By the end of the war, 4,000 air, navy, and army officers had completed the 120-hour aircraft recognition course at Ohio State. They, in turn, taught the system to more than a million servicemen. As radar-based aircraft identification became more reliable, visual recognition became less important—but until electronic identification was fully perfected after the war, the Renshaw system remained the last line of defense against friendly fire. After the war, the navy honored Renshaw with its highest civilian decoration, the Distinguished Public Service Award. ✯

This article was published in the February 2021 issue of World War II.


RFA Denbydale


Background Data : Originally there were to have been nineteen ships in this Class. The first six were purchased off the stocks fro the British Tanker Co Ltd whilst building at the instigation of the then Director of Stores, Sir William Gick, who was concerned at the age of the RFA Fleet and ships that were approaching the end of their economic lives. A further two ships were purchased from Anglo Saxon Petroleum Co Ltd for evaluation purposes. At the outbreak of WW2, a further eleven ships were acquired from the MoWT war programme although one of these, to have been named EPPINGDALE, which had been registered in London as EMPIRE GOLD on 21/02/43 and intended for transfer to the Admiralty for manning and management as an RFA and despite five Officers being appointed to her, the intended transfer was cancelled the following day and she thus never entered RFA service. Three of this Class were converted into LSG’s and were then reconverted back into tankers at the end of the War

16 October 1940 Mr M N Carlyle RFA appointed as Chief Engineer Officer

19 October 1940 launched by Blythswood Shipbuilding Co Ltd, Scotstoun as Yard Nr: 62 named EMPIRE SILVER for the MoWT and originally intended for management by Eagle Oil Transport Co Ltd, London

30 December 1940 acquired by the Admiralty and renamed DENBYDALE

3 January 1941 Captain Archibald Hobson RFA appointed as Master

Captain Archibald Hobson RFA

30 January 1941 completed

16 February 1941 sailed the Clyde in and joined Liverpool escorted convoy OB 287 which dispersed. Then sailed independently to Point à Pierre, Trinidad arriving 10 March 1941

30 March 1941 sailed Trinidad independently to Halifax arriving 9 April 1941

16 April 1941 sailed Halifax in escorted convoy HX121 carrying a cargo of petrol to the Clyde arriving 1 May 1941

2 May 1941 sailed the Clyde independently to Liverpool arriving the next day

4 May 1941 - 5 May 1941 bombed overnight at Liverpool, no injuries reported

15 May 1941 Mr Charles A Drummond RFA appointed as Chief Engineer Officer

Chief Engineer Officer Charles A Drummond RFA

18 May 1941 sailed Liverpool in escorted convoy OB324 which then dispersed at 53°00N 29°30W. Then independently to Bermuda arriving 16 June 1941 for repairs

20 June 1941 sailed Bermuda independently to Curaçao arriving 25 June 1941

29 June 1941 sailed Curaçao independently to Gibraltar arriving 16 July 1941

19 September 1941 - 07:49 while lying alongside the Detached Mole at Gibraltar, she was attacked by 3 Siluro a Lenta Corsa (SLC) - slow running human torpedo / frogmen teams - from the Italian tanker Olterra in Algecerias and which had been scuttled by her crew at the start of the war.

The Spanish raised her and without their knowledge the Italian crew converted her into a base for their human torpedo / frogmen teams . As a result the attack Denbydale's back was broken and she was partially sunk, fortunately without any casualties. She was patched up and spent the rest of her career as a fuelling and accommodation hulk at Gibraltar. Her main engine was dismantled and was sent back to the U.K. although some parts were lost en route when the carrying vessel was sunk. The remainder was later fitted to RFA DERWENTDALE (1). The oil depot ship FIONA SHELL was also sunk in this attack and the British steamer DURHAM was badly damaged

24 September 1941 the Lancashire Evening News reported on several news items received from Rome one of which stated .

9 March 1942 Chief Officer George W Webster RFA appointed as Chief Officer-in-charge

Chief Officer George W Webster RFA

12 March 1943 at Gibraltar with USS Murphy (DD603) and USS Simpson (DD221) moored alongside to refuel. USS Murphy received 21,742 gallons of fuel

13 March 1943 USS Murphy and USS Simpson cast off and sailed Gibraltar for Cassablanca

16 March 1943 at Gibraltar moored to Buoy No: 14 with USS Jeffers (DD621) moored alongside

USS Jeffers (DD 621)

24 March 1943 at Gibraltar moored to Buoy No: 14 with USS Herbert (DD160) and USS Chickadee (AM59) moored alongside

25 March 1943 at Gibraltar moored to Buoy No: 14 with USS Herbert (DD160) and USS Dallas (DD199) moored alongside

6 November 1943 at Gibraltar with HMS CEYLON moored alongside being refuelled

15 February 1944 at Gibraltar moored to Buoy No: 13 with USS Dupont (DD941) alongside to refuel

USS Dupont (DD 941)

17 February 1944 Chief Officer R Atkinson RFA appointed as Chief Officer-in-charge

5 October 1944 holed at Gibraltar when the minesweeping sloop HMS REGULUS struck her amidships

20 February 1945 at Gibraltar at 36 berth with USS Neilds (DD 616) moored alongside to refuel

USS Neilds (DD 616)

10 March 1945 was hit by Norwegian tanker 'Arena' while Denbydale was alongside in Gibraltar - no damage reported.

19 July 1955 towed from Gibraltar by the Dutch Tug Oostzee to be broken up at Blyth by Hughes Bolckow Ltd

Dutch Tug Oostzee

26 July 1955 passed the Lloyds Signal Station on Flamborough Head heading north under tow


Watch the video: ΠΑΡΟΥΣΙΑΣΗ ΣΤΗΝ ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΪΔΑ ΤΟΥ ΒΙΒΛΙΟΥ ΤΟΥ ΓΙΩΡΓΟΥ ΛΙΑΝΗ ΣΥΝΟΜΙΛΩΝΤΑΣ ΜΕ ΤΟΝ 20ο ΑΙΩΝΑ