May 2006 in Iraq - History

May 2006 in Iraq - History


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May 2006 in Iraq
US Casualties

May 3rd- A suicide bomber wearing an explosive vest attacked a police recruiting statin in Falluja. The bomber killed 16 Iraqis waiting to interviewed for jobs. In additional 34 bodies of young men were found around Baghdad. The bodies of those found showed signs of torture.

May 7th ,14 people were killed and another 40 were wounded when three car bombs exploded within minutes of each other. Two of the bombs went off in Baghdad while the third bomb wen off in Karbala- the holy Shite city.the same day over 50 bodies of young men were found around Baghdad.

May 9th 17 people were killed when a suicide bomber driving a pickup truck exploded himself a public marked in Shite neighborhood in the city of Tal Afar. 65 people were wounded in the attack.

May 14th- 14 people were killed and another 16 were wounded when two suicide car bombers attacked the main checkpoint for Baghdad airport. The attacks were just one of the many attacks that took place throughout the country that killed a total of 32 people including 2 American soldiers and 2 British soldiers.

May 16th Two minibuses filled with gunmen drove into a parking lot in a Shite neighborhood in Northern Iraq. They opened fire killing five militiamen working as guards. They then left behind a bomb that exploded a few minutes later killing an additional 18

May 23rd Thirty Iraqis died in a series of attacks throughout Iraq. The largest of the attacks took place when a motor bike rider exploded his bomb in front of a Felafiel stand in a heavily Sunni section of Northern Baghdad killing 11.


Baghdad Journal: May 7, 2006

— -- I survived Fallujah, but the treadmill nearly got me. If you have followed any news from Iraq, you know the power here is only on for about eight hours a day, and that is on a good day. One grows quite used to the lights going on and off and on and off, and generators turning on and off and so on.

Nevertheless, I wasn't thinking about any of this as I was going for my morning run today on the treadmill (yes, wearing my hunky lilac sneakers). I was on about mile 2 when all of a sudden the power went out. The treadmill stopped, but I didn't. I launched myself forward in a manner so clumsy it defies imagination. Somehow I survived. Only in Iraq.

I don't mean to make light of the electricity situation it is a serious, serious problem. In the summer here you need air conditioning -- the temperature gets up to 130 degrees, and that isn't some journalistic exaggeration.

On the subject of exaggeration, below you will see a Reuters snippet about a car bombing in Karbala, a horrific event to be sure. Reuters reports that 21 people were killed. It claims it got its information from the Interior Ministry. When we called police in Karbala, they told us five people were killed. And this evening, the U.S. military put out a press release saying that two people were killed.

Whom do you believe? What number do you use? Numbers are strange things here, and everyone has a different motive behind the number given. Karbala is a Shiite city, and the Interior Ministry is run by Shiites. Is it possible that it gave an inflated number to Reuters to make Shiites seem like greater victims? The U.S. military clearly has an interest in the situation improving here, so is it possible that it wants to use a lower number to make the attack seem less violent than it was? And the kicker is, we will never know who is right. Only in Iraq.

We heard some gunshots today not too far from the bureau, nothing terribly alarming. But it is that last statement -- "nothing terribly alarming" -- that requires explanation. The first time one hears "shots fired in anger," it is a truly remarkable and terrifying thing. My first time was in the desert outside Nasiriyah during the invasion in 2003. People started shooting, and I jumped into a trench and managed to get myself stuck. No joke. It wasn't particularly heroic, but I wasn't aiming for heroic at the time.

After that first time, your reaction changes some. I don't want to say you get used to it, but you start to learn a little about how far away the shots are coming from, where they might be headed and if there is anything you can really do to protect yourself. The other night, after I'd already gone to bed, there was some pretty loud, piercing automatic fire that woke me up. I remember thinking, "Wow, those shots are pretty loud. But you know what? I am probably safer in bed than anywhere." So I just went back to sleep. Sleeping is always the responsible solution. Only in Iraq.

An update on the office aroma: It is markedly better, I would say. Fox the dog moved his primary residence outside today. He now spends most of his time in our yard, rather than underneath our desk eating leftovers. We do miss him and will work out some sort of visitation plan. But I don't think I will miss the sensation of having him rub a six-hour-old, half-eaten lamb chop against my leg.

By popular demand, I have included the Reuters list of the day's developments. Believe me, this list is nothing unusual.

RAMADI -- A civilian was killed and three were wounded, including a child and a woman, in clashes between insurgents and U.S. forces in the western city of Ramadi, 110 km (70 miles) west of Baghdad, hospital official Aala al-Dulaimi said.

SAMARRA -- U.S. forces detained five suspects -- one believed to be a senior al Qaeda operative -- and killed an unknown number of suspected rebels in raids on Friday near the city of Samarra, the U.S. military said in a statement.

HADITHA -- Gunmen set fire to three trucks carrying food to the U.S. military in Haditha, 150 km (95 miles) west of Baghdad, a traffic policeman said. There was no information on casualties.

KERBALA -- A car bomb killed 21 people and wounded 52 near the central bus station in Kerbala, police said.

BAGHDAD -- Eight people were killed and 15 wounded when a suicide car bomber targeted an Iraqi army patrol in the Aadhamiya district of the capital, police said. The casualties included soldiers and civilians.

BAGHDAD -- One civilian was killed and six were wounded when a car bomb exploded in northern Baghdad, police said. The target of the explosion was not clear.

BASRA -- Five people were killed and 42 wounded on Saturday during clashes between British forces and youths after a British helicopter came down in the southern city of Basra, the local health service said.

BAGHDAD -- The bodies of 42 people, many of them showing signs of torture, were found in Baghdad in the 24 hours from Saturday morning, an Interior Ministry source said. These included eight bodies found on Sunday at a garbage dump near the Kindi hospital in eastern Baghdad.

MAHAWEEL -- A civilian was wounded on Saturday when Iraqi troops opened fire in Mahaweel, 75 km (50 miles) south of Baghdad, police said. Details of the incident were unclear.

MOSUL -- Three policemen were killed when a roadside bomb went off near their patrol in the northern city of Mosul, 390 km (240 miles) north of Baghdad, police said.


Fact Sheet: The Strategic Framework Agreement and the Security Agreement with Iraq

Both agreements protect U.S. interests in the Middle East, help the Iraqi people stand on their own, and reinforce Iraqi sovereignty.

The SFA normalizes the U.S.-Iraqi relationship with strong economic, diplomatic, cultural, and security ties – and serves as the foundation for a long-term bilateral relationship based on mutual goals.

The Security Agreement guides our security relationship with Iraq and governs the U.S. presence, activities, and eventual withdrawal from Iraq. This agreement ensures vital protections for U.S. troops and provides operational authorities for our forces so we can help sustain the positive security trends as we continue to transition to a supporting role.

The Success Of The Surge And The Courage Of The Iraqi People Set The Conditions For These Historic Negotiations

The sustained security gains and increasing capacity and confidence of the Iraqi government and the Iraqi Security Forces are reasons the United States and the Iraqis were able to negotiate these agreements.

These Agreements are what our troops have been fighting for and working toward: the moment when Iraqis could begin taking responsibility for security and governance on their own – something they could not have done two years ago.

To Ensure That The Security Agreement Is Consistent With The Capacity Of Iraq's Security Forces, The Dates Included In This Agreement Were Discussed With The Iraqis, General Petraeus, And General Odierno – They Allow For The Continued Transition Of Security Responsibilities To The Iraqis

As we further transition security responsibilities to the Iraqi Security Forces, military commanders will continue to move U.S. combat forces out of major populated areas so that they are all out by June 30, 2009.

The Security Agreement also sets a date of December 31, 2011, for all U.S. forces to withdraw from Iraq. This date reflects the increasing capacity of the Iraqi Security Forces as demonstrated in operations this year throughout Iraq, as well as an improved regional atmosphere towards Iraq, an expanding Iraqi economy, and an increasingly confident Iraqi government.

These dates therefore are based on an assessment of positive conditions on the ground and a realistic projection of when U.S. forces can reduce their presence and return home without a sacrificing the security gains made since the surge.

The Security Agreement Will Protect The United States And Our Troops And Incorporates The Visions Of An Independent And Bipartisan Commission

U.S. soldiers and civilians on the ground will continue to have uninterrupted and essential protections while serving in Iraq. Our troops will also continue to have essential operational authorities to sustain positive security trends seen in Iraq over the past year.

The Security Agreement also reflects the Baker-Hamilton Iraq Study Group’s recommendation that the Security Agreement include authorities for the United States to continue fighting al Qaeda and other terrorist organizations in Iraq, continued support for Iraqi Security Forces, and political reassurances to the government of Iraq.

These Agreements Will Advance A Stable Iraq In The Heart Of The Middle East

The SFA and Security Agreement with Iraq move us closer to the strategic vision we all hope for in the Middle East: a region of independent states, at peace with one another, fully participating in the global market of goods and ideas, and an ally in the War on Terror.

The SFA implements the Iraqi and U.S. desire for a long-term relationship based on cooperation and friendship as set out in the Declaration of Principles signed in November 2007. The SFA also includes commitments on:

  • Defense, security, law enforcement, and judicial cooperation and development.
  • Further improvement of political, diplomatic, and cultural cooperation.
  • Economic, energy, health, environment, technology, and communications cooperation.
  • Joint Coordination Committees to monitor the implementation of the SFA.

The SFA And Security Agreement Are The Final Steps In Iraq's Request For Normalized Relations

In a Communiqué issued on August 26, 2007, Iraq’s five principal political leaders – Prime Minister Maliki, President Talabani, Vice Presidents Hashimi and Abd al-Mahdi, and Kurdistan Regional Government President Barzani – requested an end to Chapter VII status under the U.N. Security Council and the establishment of a long-term relationship with the United States.

This led to the U.S.- Iraq Declaration of Principles signed on November 26, 2007, which laid out a "table of contents" that the United States and Iraq would discuss in official negotiations. Bilateral negotiations began in earnest in March 2008.

The SFA and Security Agreement, which are the result of the Communiqué and the Declaration of Principles, were approved by the Iraqi Cabinet and the Council of Representatives on November 27, 2008. On December 4, Iraq’s three-person Presidency Council endorsed the COR’s vote.


Unity Through Autonomy in Iraq

A decade ago, Bosnia was torn apart by ethnic cleansing and facing its demise as a single country. After much hesitation, the United States stepped in decisively with the Dayton Accords,which kept the country whole by, paradoxically, dividing it into ethnic federations, even allowing Muslims, Croats and Serbs to retain separate armies. With the help of American and other forces, Bosnians have lived a decade in relative peace and are now slowly strengthening their common central government, including disbanding those separate armies last year.

Now the Bush administration, despite its profound strategic misjudgments in Iraq, has a similar opportunity. To seize it, however, America must get beyond the present false choice between "staying the course" and "bringing the troops home now" and choose a third way that would wind down our military presence responsibly while preventing chaos and preserving our key security goals.

The idea, as in Bosnia, is to maintain a united Iraq by decentralizing it, giving each ethno-religious group — Kurd, Sunni Arab and Shiite Arab — room to run its own affairs, while leaving the central government in charge of common interests. We could drive this in place with irresistible sweeteners for the Sunnis to join in, a plan designed by the military for withdrawing and redeploying American forces, and a regional nonaggression pact.

It is increasingly clear that President Bush does not have a strategy for victory in Iraq. Rather, he hopes to prevent defeat and pass the problem along to his successor. Meanwhile, the frustration of Americans is mounting so fast that Congress might end up mandating a rapid pullout, even at the risk of precipitating chaos and a civil war that becomes a regional war.

As long as American troops are in Iraq in significant numbers, the insurgents can't win and we can't lose. But intercommunal violence has surpassed the insurgency as the main security threat. Militias rule swathes of Iraq and death squads kill dozens daily. Sectarian cleansing has recently forced tens of thousands from their homes. On top of this, President Bush did not request additional reconstruction assistance and is slashing funds for groups promoting democracy.

Iraq's new government of national unity will not stop the deterioration. Iraqis have had three such governments in the last three years, each with Sunnis in key posts, without noticeable effect. The alternative path out of this terrible trap has five elements.

The first is to establish three largely autonomous regions with a viable central government in Baghdad. The Kurdish, Sunni and Shiite regions would each be responsible for their own domestic laws, administration and internal security. The central government would control border defense, foreign affairs and oil revenues. Baghdad would become a federal zone, while densely populated areas of mixed populations would receive both multisectarian and international police protection.

Decentralization is hardly as radical as it may seem: the Iraqi Constitution, in fact, already provides for a federal structure and a procedure for provinces to combine into regional governments.

Besides, things are already heading toward partition: increasingly, each community supports federalism, if only as a last resort. The Sunnis, who until recently believed they would retake power in Iraq, are beginning to recognize that they won't and don't want to live in a Shiite-controlled, highly centralized state with laws enforced by sectarian militias. The Shiites know they can dominate the government, but they can't defeat a Sunni insurrection. The Kurds will not give up their 15-year-old autonomy.

Some will say moving toward strong regionalism would ignite sectarian cleansing. But that's exactly what is going on already, in ever-bigger waves. Others will argue that it would lead to partition. But a breakup is already under way. As it was in Bosnia, a strong federal system is a viable means to prevent both perils in Iraq.

The second element would be to entice the Sunnis into joining the federal system with an offer they couldn't refuse. To begin with, running their own region should be far preferable to the alternatives: being dominated by Kurds and Shiites in a central government or being the main victims of a civil war. But they also have to be given money to make their oil-poor region viable. The Constitution must be amended to guarantee Sunni areas 20 percent (approximately their proportion of the population) of all revenues.

The third component would be to ensure the protection of the rights of women and ethno-religious minorities by increasing American aid to Iraq but tying it to respect for those rights. Such protections will be difficult, especially in the Shiite-controlled south, but Washington has to be clear that widespread violations will stop the cash flow.

Fourth, the president must direct the military to design a plan for withdrawing and redeploying our troops from Iraq by 2008 (while providing for a small but effective residual force to combat terrorists and keep the neighbors honest). We must avoid a precipitous withdrawal that would lead to a national meltdown , but we also can't have a substantial long-term American military presence. That would do terrible damage to our armed forces, break American and Iraqi public support for the mission and leave Iraqis without any incentive to shape up.

Fifth, under an international or United Nations umbrella, we should convene a regional conference to pledge respect for Iraq's borders and its federal system. For all that Iraq's neighbors might gain by picking at its pieces, each faces the greater danger of a regional war. A "contact group" of major powers would be set up to lean on neighbors to comply with the deal.

Mr. Bush has spent three years in a futile effort to establish a strong central government in Baghdad, leaving us without a real political settlement, with a deteriorating security situation — and with nothing but the most difficult policy choices. The five-point alternative plan offers a plausible path to that core political settlement among Iraqis, along with the economic, military and diplomatic levers to make the political solution work. It is also a plausible way for Democrats and Republicans alike to protect our basic security interests and honor our country's sacrifices.


The Dictator of Iraq

Saddam Hussein ruled Iraq with a brutal hand, using fear and terror to stay in power. He established a secret police force that suppressed internal dissenters and developed a "cult of personality" to build public support. His goal was to become the leader of the Arab world, with territory to include the oil fields of the Persian Gulf.

Saddam led Iraq in a war against Iran from 1980 to 1988, which ended in a stalemate. Also during the 1980s, Saddam used chemical weapons against Kurds within Iraq, including gassing the Kurdish town of Halabja which killed 5,000 in March 1988.

In 1990, Saddam ordered Iraqi troops to take the country of Kuwait. In response, the United States defended Kuwait in the Persian Gulf War.

On March 19, 2003, the United States attacked Iraq. Saddam fled Baghdad during the fighting. On December 13, 2003, U.S. forces found him hiding in a hole in al-Dwar, near Tikrit.


Fallen Heroes of Operation Iraqi Freedom

Click on a servicemember's name for more information.

Navy (54) Cmdr. Joseph Acevedo, 46, of New York, New York. Acevedo died in Manama, Bahrain. He was assigned to the Naval Forces Central Command, Tampa, Florida. Died on April 13, 2003. Lt. Thomas Mullen Adams, 27, of La Mesa, California. Killed when two Royal Navy Sea King helicopters collided over international waters. He was assigned as an exchange officer with the Royal Navy's 849 Squadron since October 2002. Died on March 22, 2003. Hospitalman Zachary M. Alday, 22, of Donalsonville, Georgia. Alday died from injuries sustained earlier in the day when the vehicle in which he was riding struck a land mine while conducting combat operations against enemy forces in the Al Anbar Province of Iraq. He was assigned to the 1st Battalion, 7th Marines, 7th Regimental Combat Team, 1st Marine Expeditionary Force (Forward), Camp Pendleton, California. Died on June 9, 2006. Hospitalman Geovani Padilla Aleman, 20, of South Gate, California. Aleman died as a result of enemy action in Al Anbar Province, Iraq. He was permanently assigned to Bethesda Naval Hospital, USNS Comfort Detachment and operationally assigned to Third Battalion, Eighth Marine Regiment, 2/28 Brigade Combat Team. Died on April 2, 2006. Petty Officer 2nd Class Michael C. Anderson, 36, of Daytona, Florida. Anderson died in the Al Anbar Province as a result of hostile fire. He was assigned to Naval Mobile Construction Battalion 14, Jacksonville, Florida. Died on May 2, 2004. Petty Officer 1st Class Howard E. Babcock IV, 33, of Houston, Texas. Babcock died in a motorcycle accident in Bahrain. He was assigned to the Naval Computer and Telecommunications Station in Bahrain. Died on October 13, 2005. Petty Officer 2nd Class Cesar O. Baez, 37, of Pomona, California. Baez died as a result of enemy small arms fire while conducting combat operations in al-Anbar province, Iraq. He was a Hospital Corpsman assigned to 2nd Marine Division, II Marine Expeditionary Force (Forward). Died on June 15, 2005. Chief Joel Egan Baldwin, 37, of Canal Zone, Republic of Panama. Baldwin died in Mosul, Iraq, when a suicide bomber entered his dining facility and detonated an improvised explosive device. He was assigned to Navy Mobile Construction Battalion 7, Gulfport, Mississippi. Died on December 21, 2004. Petty Officer 3rd Class Doyle W. Bollinger, Jr., 21, of Poteau, Oklahoma. Bollinger died in Iraq when a piece of unexploded ordnance accidentally detonated in the area he was working. He was assigned to Naval Mobile Construction Battalion 133, Gulfport, Mississippi. Died on June 6, 2003. Seaman Pablito Pena Briones, Jr., 22, of Anaheim, California. Briones died of a non-hostile gun shot wound in Fallujah, Iraq. He was assigned to 1st Marine Division Detachment, Naval Medical Center San Diego, California. Died on December 28, 2004. Seaman Sheree Cannon, 20, of Baltimore, Maryland. Cannon died of non-combat related causes. She was assigned to the USS Enterprise (CVN-65) Norfolk, Virginia. Died on October 25, 2003. Petty Officer 3rd Class David A. Cedergren, 25, of South St. Paul, Minnesota. Cedergren died near Iskandariayah, Iraq, in a non-combat related incident. He was assigned to the 2nd Marine Division Fleet Marine Forces Atlantic. Died on September 11, 2004. Petty Officer 1st Class Regina R. Clark, 43, of Centralia, Washington. Clark died in a convoy that was attacked by a vehicle-borne improvised explosive device in Fallujah. She was a culinary specialist deployed with Naval Construction Region Detachment 30, Port Hueneme, California and was temporarily assigned to II Marine Expeditionary Force (Forward). Died on June 23, 2005. Chief Petty Officer Paul J. Darga, 34, of Alpena, Michigan. Darga died when his Explosive Ordnance Disposal Team was struck by an improvised explosive device while responding to a previous strike. His unit was conducting combat operations against enemy forces in the Al Anbar province, Iraq. Darga was assigned to Explosive Ordnance Disposal Mobile Unit Two, serving with the 1st Marine Logistics Group. Died on August 22, 2006. Petty Officer 3rd Class Lee Hamilton Deal, 23, of West Monroe, Louisiana. Deal died as a result of enemy action in Al Anbar province, Iraq. He was operationally assigned to Regimental Combat Team-5, I Marine Expeditionary Force (Forward), and permanently assigned to 2nd Marine Division Fleet Marine Force Atlantic, Camp Lejeune, North Carolina. Died on May 17, 2006. Petty Officer 3rd Class Christopher M. Dickerson, 33, of Eastman, Georgia. Dickerson died in Al Anbar province, Iraq, when his military vehicle hit an improvised explosive device while traveling in a convoy. He was a member of Naval Mobile Construction Battalion 14, based in Jacksonville, Florida. Died on April 30, 2004. Petty Officer 2nd Class Trace W. Dossett, 37, of Orlando, Florida. Dossett died in the Al Anbar Province as a result of hostile fire. He was assigned to Naval Mobile Construction Battalion 14, Jacksonville, Florida. Died on May 2, 2004. Petty Officer 2nd Class Jason B. Dwelley, 31, of Apopka, Florida. Dwelley died in Al Anbar province, Iraq, when his military vehicle hit an improvised explosive device while traveling in a convoy. He was a member of Naval Mobile Construction Battalion 14, based in Jacksonville, Florida. Died on April 30, 2004. Petty Officer 2nd Class Allan M. Cundanga Espiritu, 28, of Oxnard, California. Espiritu died from an improvised explosive device while conducting combat operations in the vicinity of Ar Ramadi, Iraq. He was assigned to 2nd Force Service Support Group (Forward), II Marine Expeditionary Force (Forward). Died on November 1, 2005. Petty Officer 3rd Class Ronald A. Ginther, 37, of Auburndale, Florida. Ginther died in the Al Anbar Province as a result of hostile fire. He was assigned to Naval Mobile Construction Battalion 14, Jacksonville, Florida. Died on May 2, 2004. Petty Officer 2nd Class Michael J. Gray, 32, of Richmond, Virginia. Gray died in an automobile accident in Kuwait. Gray was traveling to Kuwait Navy Base when his vehicle was struck from the rear by a civilian vehicle. He was assigned to Navy Detachment Kuwait Navy Base. Died on March 5, 2004. Petty Officer 3rd Class John D. House, 28, of Ventura, California. House died in a helicopter crash near Ar Rutbah, Iraq. He was assigned to Naval Medical Clinic Hawaii, Marine Corps Units Detachment, Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. Died on January 26, 2005. Petty Officer 1st Class Thomas C. Hull, 41, of Princeton, Illinois. Hull died on board the aircraft carrier USS Nimitz in the Arabian Gulf after being medically evacuated to the carrier for a non-combat related incident. He was an operations specialist assigned to the USS Princeton, home ported in San Diego, California. Died on August 2, 2005. Lt. Cmdr. Edward E. Jack, 51, of Detroit, Michigan. Jack died of a non-combat related incident aboard the USS Bonhomme Richard. He was assigned to Commander, Destroyer Squadron Seven, home ported in San Diego, California. Died on January 29, 2005. Petty Officer 2nd Class Jaime S. Jaenke, 29, of Bay City, Wisconsin. Jaenke died as a result of enemy action when her HMMWV was struck by an improvised explosive device in Al Anbar province, Iraq. She was assigned to Naval Mobile Construction Battalion 25, Fort McCoy, Wisconsin. Died on June 5, 2006. Petty Officer 2nd Class Robert B. Jenkins, 35, of Stuart, Florida. Jenkins died in the Al Anbar Province as a result of hostile fire. He was assigned to Naval Mobile Construction Battalion 14, Jacksonville, Florida. Died on May 2, 2004. Hospital Corpsman 3rd Class Michael Vann Johnson, Jr., 25, of Little Rock, Arkansas. Killed in combat, when shrapnel from a grenade hit him in the head. He was assigned to Naval Medical Center, Third Marine Division Detachment, San Diego, California. Died on March 25, 2003. Lt. Kylan A. Jones-Huffman, 31, of Aptos, California. Jones-Huffman was killed by an unidentified gunman in Al Hillah, Iraq. He was on temporary duty with the I Marine Expeditionary Force. Died on August 21, 2003. Petty Officer 2nd Class Brian K. Joplin, 32, of Hugo, Oklahoma. Joplin was killed when he fell out of a Navy MH-53 helicopter during a regularly scheduled training mission in the Central Arabian Gulf. He was assigned to Helicopter Mine Countermeasures Squadron 15, based in Corpus Christi, Texas. Died on October 4, 2005. Petty Officer 1st Class Michael Anthony Jordan, 35, of Augusta, Georgia. Jordan died in an automobile accident in Manama, Bahrain. He was assigned to Destroyer Squadron 50, Bahrain. Died on January 13, 2006. Hospitalman Aaron A. Kent, 28, of Portland, Oregon. Kent died from an improvised explosive device while conducting combat operations near Fallujah, Iraq. Kent was assigned to 2nd Marine Division, II Marine Expeditionary Force (Forward), Camp Lejeune, North Carolina. Died on April 23, 2005. Hospitalman Chadwick T. Kenyon, 20, of Tucson, Arizona. Kenyon died of injuries suffered when his vehicle was struck by an improvised explosive device while conducting combat operations against enemy forces in the Al Anbar province, Iraq. Kenyon was assigned to the 3rd Light Armored Reconnaissance Battalion, 1st Marine Division, I Marine Expeditionary Force, Twentynine Palms, California. Died on August 20, 2006. Petty Officer 3rd Class Eric L. Knott, 21, of Grand Island, Nebraska. Knott died of shrapnel wounds when the area in which he was working was struck by enemy fire. He was assigned to Naval Mobile Construction Battalion 4, Port Hueneme, California. Died on September 4, 2004. Petty Officer 2nd Class Edward A. Koth, 30, of Towson, Maryland. Koth died at Camp Victory, Iraq, after ordnance exploded during a disposal operation. Koth was assigned to Explosive Ordnance Disposal Mobile Unit Eight, serving with Multinational Corps Iraq in Baghdad. Died on July 26, 2006. Petty Officer 2nd Class Marc A. Lee, 28, of Hood River, Oregon. Lee died during combat operations while on patrol in Ramadi, Iraq. Lee was an aviation ordnanceman and a member of a West Coast-based SEAL Team. Died on August 2, 2006. Seaman Apprentice Robert D. Macrum, 22, of Sugarland, Texas. Macrum was lost at sea. He was last seen the evening of September 12, 2005 while the ship was underway. He was assigned to the USS Princeton, currently deployed to the Arabian Gulf conducting maritime security operations as part of the Nimitz Carrier Strike Group. Hospitalman Robert Nathan Martens, 20, of Queen Creek, Arizona. Martens died from injuries sustained as a passenger when his HMMWV rolled over in Al Qaim, Iraq. He was assigned to II Marine Division, Camp Lejeune, North Carolina. Died on September 6, 2005. Hospitalman Joshua McIntosh, 22, of Kingman, Arizona. McIntosh died in Karbala, Iraq, from a non-hostile gunshot wound. He was assigned to the Third Battalion, Seventh Marine Regiment, Twentynine Palms, California. Died on June 26, 2003. Petty Officer 2nd Class Scott R. Mchugh, 33, of Boca Raton, Florida. Mchugh died in the Al Anbar Province as a result of hostile fire. He was assigned to Naval Mobile Construction Battalion 14, Jacksonville, Florida. Died on May 2, 2004. Petty Officer 3rd Class Fernando A. Mendez-Aceves, 27, of Mexico City, Mexico. Mendez-Aceves was killed in Iraq while conducting combat operations in the Al Anbar Province. He was assigned to the Naval Medical Center San Diego, First Marine Division Detachment, San Diego, California. Died on April 6, 2004. Petty Officer 3rd Class David J. Moreno, 26, of Gering, Nebraska. Moreno died in Al Hamishiyah, Iraq, from a non-hostile gunshot wound. He was assigned to the Naval Medical Center San Diego, Fourth Marine Division Detachment. Died on July 17, 2003. Petty Officer 3rd Class Marcques J. Nettles, 22, of Beaverton, Oregon. Nettles died when the seven-ton truck he was riding in rolled over in a flash flood near Al Asad, Iraq. He was assigned to 1st Combat Logistics Battalion, 1st Marine Logistics Group, I Marine Expeditionary Force, Camp Pendleton, California. Died on April 2, 2006. Petty Officer 1st Class Michael J. Pernaselli, 27, of Monroe, New York. Pernaselli died in the Northern Persian Gulf as a result of a waterborne attack. He was assigned to the USS Firebolt, forward deployed to Manama, Bahrain. Died on April 24, 2004. Petty Officer 1st Class Gary T. Rovinski, 44, of Roseville, Illinois. Rovinski died in Al Anbar Province, Iraq, as a result of enemy action when his HMMWV was struck by an improvised explosive device. He was assigned to Naval Mobile Construction Battalion 25, Fort McCoy, Wisconsin. Died on June 5, 2006. Petty Officer 3rd Class David Sisung, 21, of Phoenix, Arizona. Sinsung died of a non-combat related injury while in the Persian Gulf. He was assigned to the USS Nimitz, home ported in San Diego, California. Died on June 6, 2003. Lt. Cmdr. Keith E. Taylor, 47, of Irvine, California. Taylor died in a rocket attack on the U.S. Embassy in Baghdad. He was assigned to Commander, U.S. Naval Forces, Central Command, Iraq Detachment. Died on January 29, 2005. Petty Officer 1st Class Jerry A. Tharp, 44, of Aledo, Illinois. Tharp died as a result of enemy action when his dismounted patrol was struck by an improvised explosive device while operating in the Al Anbar province of Iraq. He was assigned to Naval Mobile Construction Battalion 25, Rock Island, Illinois. Died on July 12, 2006. Petty Officer 3rd Class Christopher W. Thompson, 25, of N. Wilkesboro, North Carolina. Thompson was killed in action from an IED explosion while conducting Combat operations against enemy forces in the Al Anbar Province of Iraq. He was assigned to Echo Company, 2nd Battalion, 2nd Marines, 8th Regimental Combat Team, 2nd Marine Division, Fleet Marine Forces Atlantic, based in Camp Lejeune, North Carolina. Died on October 21, 2005. Petty Officer 2nd Class Christopher E. Watts, 28, of Knoxville, Tennessee. Watts died in the Northern Persian Gulf as a result of a waterborne attack. He was assigned to the USS Firebolt, forward deployed to Manama, Bahrain. Died on April 24, 2004. Lt. Nathan D. White, 30, of Abilene, Texas. Killed in action. White was the pilot of an F/A-18C Hornet lost over Iraq. He was assigned to Strike Fighter Squadron One Nine Five (VFA 195), based in Atsugi, Japan, and currently deployed with Carrier Air Wing Five (CVW 5) aboard USS Kitty Hawk (CV 63). Died on April 2, 2003. Petty Officer 3rd Class Jeffery L. Wiener, 32, of Louisville, Kentucky. Wiener died in a combat related incident. He was a Navy hospital corpsman assigned to II Marine Expeditionary Force (MEF). Died on May 7, 2005. Petty Officer 3rd Class Nicholas Wilson, 25, of Newark Valley, New York. Wilson died as a result of an improvised explosive device in Al Anbar Province, Iraq. He was assigned to Explosive Ordnance Disposal Mobile Unit Three, based in San Diego, California. Died on February 12, 2006. Petty Officer 3rd Class Julian Woods, 22, of Jacksonville, Florida. Woods died as a result of hostile fire in Fallujah, Iraq. He was assigned to 3rd Marine Division Detachment, Marine Corps Base Hawaii, Kaheohe Bay, Hawaii. Died on November 10, 2004. Petty Officer 3rd Class Travis L. Youngblood, 26, of Surrency, Georgia. Youngblood died of wounds received July 15, 2005 from an improvised explosive device during combat operations in Hit, Iraq. He was a hospital corpsman assigned to the Naval Hospital Great Lakes, Great Lakes, Illinois and deployed with the II Marine Expeditionary Force (Forward). Died on July 21, 2005. Air Force (27) Airman 1st Class Carl L. Anderson, Jr., 21, of Georgetown, South Carolina. Anderson died as result of enemy action near Mosul, Iraq. He was assigned to the 3rd Logistics Readiness Squadron, Elmendorf Air Force Base, Alaska. Died on August 29, 2004. Capt. Derek Argel, 28, of Lompoc, California. Argel died in the crash of an Iraqi air force aircraft during a training mission in eastern Diyala province. He was assigned to the 23rd Special Tactics Squadron, Hurlburt Field, Florida. Died on May 30, 2005. Master Sgt. Steven E. Auchman, 37, of Waterloo, New York. Auchman died from injuries received when multiple rocket propelled grenades struck his location in Mosul, Iraq. He was assigned to the 5th Air Support Operations Squadron, Fort Lewis, Washington. Died on November 9, 2004. Capt. John J. Boria, 29, of Broken Arrow, Oklahoma. Boria died from injuries he received in an all-terrain vehicle accident in Doha, Qatar. He was assigned to the 911th Air Refueling Squadron, Grand Forks Air Force Base, North Dakota. Died on September 6, 2004. Tech. Sgt. Bruce E. Brown, 32, of Coatopa, Alabama. Brown was killed in a motor vehicle accident near Al Udeid, Qatar. He was a fuels supervisor assigned to the 78th Logistics Readiness Squadron, Robins Air Force Base, Georgia. Died on September 4, 2003. Master Sgt. Brad A. Clemmons, 37, of Chillicothe, Ohio. Clemmons died when an improvised explosive device struck his vehicle. The vehicle was part of a transportation convoy enroute to Taji, Iraq. Clemmons was assigned to the 354th Civil Engineer Squadron, Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska. Died on August 21, 2006. Staff Sgt. Casey Crate, 26, of Spanaway, Washington. Crate died in the crash of an Iraqi air force aircraft during a training mission in eastern Diyala province. He was assigned to the 23rd Special Tactics Squadron, Hurlburt Field, Florida. Died on May 30, 2005. Capt. Eric B. Das, 30, of Amarillo, Texas. Das was the pilot of an F-15E that went down during a combat mission in Iraq. He was assigned to the 333rd Fighter Squadron, Seymour Johnson Air Force Base, North Carolina. Died on April 7, 2003. Maj. William Downs, 40, of Winchester, Virginia. Downs died in the crash of an Iraqi air force aircraft during a training mission in eastern Diyala province. He was assigned to the 6th Special Operations Squadron, Hurlburt Field, Florida. Died on May 30, 2005. Senior Airman Pedro I. Espaillat, Jr., 20, of Colombia, Tennessee. Espaillat died as a result of non-hostile injuries in Kirkuk, Iraq. He was assigned to the 4th Aircraft Maintenance Squadron, Seymour Johnson Air Force Base, North Carolina. Died on May 15, 2004. Capt. Jeremy Fresques, 26, of Clarkdale, Arizona. Fresques died in the crash of an Iraqi air force aircraft during a training mission in eastern Diyala province. He was assigned to the 23rd Special Tactics Squadron, Hurlburt Field, Florida. Died on May 30, 2005. Staff Sgt. Patrick Lee Griffin, Jr., 31, of Dryden, New York. Killed in action near Diwaniyah, Iraq when his convoy was ambushed enroute to Baghdad. Griffin was a data systems technician assigned to the 728th Air Control Squadron, Eglin Air Force Base, Florida. Died on May 13, 2003. Airman 1st Class Antoine J. Holt, 20, of Kennesaw, Georgia. Holt died as a result of injuries sustained when his tent was hit by a mortar round at Balad Air Field, Iraq. He was assigned to the 603rd Air Control Squadron, Aviano Air Base, Italy. Died on April 10, 2004. Airman 1st Class Elizabeth N. Jacobson, 21, of Riviera Beach, Florida. Jacobson died near Camp Bucca, Iraq, when an improvised explosive device detonated near her convoy vehicle. She was assigned to the 17th Security Forces Squadron, Goodfellow Air Force Base, Texas. Died on September 28, 2005. Civilian Daniel J. Kuhlmeier, 30, of Omaha, Nebraska. Kuhlmeier died in Baghdad, Iraq, when the convoy he was traveling in was struck by an improvised explosive device. He was assigned to Detachment 204, 2nd Field Investigations Region, Offutt Air Force Base, Nebraska. Died on February 20, 2006. Master Sgt. Jude C. Mariano, 39, of Vallejo, California. Mariano died in Doha, Qatar from injuries sustained in a motor vehicle accident. He was assigned to the 615th Air Mobility Operations Squadron, Travis Air Force Base, California. Died on February 10, 2004. Staff Sgt. Brian McElroy, 28, of San Antonio, Texas. McElroy died when his vehicle struck an improvised explosive device while conducting convoy escort duties in the vicinity of Taji, Iraq. He was assigned to the 3rd Security Forces Squadron, Elmendorf Air Force Base, Alaska. Died on January 22, 2006. Tech. Sgt. Walter M. Moss, Jr., 37, of Houston, Texas. Moss was killed in the explosion of an improvised explosive device while conducting safing operations in the vicinity of Baghdad, Iraq. He was assigned to the 366th Civil Engineer Squadron, Mountain Home AFB, Idaho. Died on March 29, 2006. Tech. Sgt. Jason L. Norton, 32, of Miami, Oklahoma. Norton died when his vehicle struck an improvised explosive device while conducting convoy escort duties in the vicinity of Taji, Iraq. He was assigned to the 3rd Security Forces Squadron, Elmendorf Air Force Base, Alaska. Died on January 22, 2006. Staff Sgt. Dustin W. Peters, 25, of El Dorado, Kansas. Peters died as result of enemy action near the Forward Operating Base Summerall in Iraq. He was assigned to the 314th Logistics Readiness Squadron, Little Rock Air Force Base, Arkansas. Died on July 11, 2004. Staff Sgt. Ray Rangel, 29, of San Antonio, Texas. Rangel died while performing a canal rescue mission in Balad, Iraq. He was assigned to the 7th Civil Engineering Squadron, Dyess Air Force Base, Texas. Died on February 13, 2005. Staff Sgt. Scott D. Sather, 29, of Clio, Michigan. Killed in action in Iraq. Sather was assigned to the 24th Special Tactics Squadron, Pope Air Force Base, North Carolina. Died on April 8, 2003. Master Sgt. David A. Scott, 51, of Union, Ohio. Scott died as a result of a non-hostile cause in Doha, Qatar. He was assigned to the 445th Communications Flight, Wright Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio. Died on July 20, 2003. Maj. Gregory Stone, 40, of Boise, Idaho. Died from wounds received by a March 22, 2003 grenade attack in a tent at Camp Pennsylvania, Kuwait. He was assigned to the 124th Air Support Operations Squadron, Idaho Air National Guard, Boise, Idaho. Died on March 25, 2003. Special Agent Rick A. Ulbright, 49, of Waldorf, Maryland. Ulbright died at Kirkuk Air Base, Iraq, from wounds received during a mortar attack. He was assigned to the 33rd Field Investigative Squadron, Andrews Air Force Base, Maryland. Died on August 8, 2004. Airman 1st Class Carl Jerome Ware, Jr., 22, of Glassboro, New Jersey. Ware died from a non-combat related cause at Camp Bucca, Iraq. He was assigned to the 15th Security Forces Squadron, Hickam Air Force Base, Hawaii. Died on July 1, 2006. Maj. William R. Watkins III, 37, of Danville, Virginia. Killed in action while supporting Operation Iraqi Freedom. Watkins was assigned to the 333rd Fighter Squadron, Seymour Johnson Air Force Base, North Carolina. Died on April 7, 2003. Coast Guard (1) Petty Officer 3rd Class Nathan B. Bruckenthal, 24, of Smithtown, New York. Bruckenthal died in the Northern Persian Gulf as a result of a waterborne attack. He was assigned to Tactical Law Enforcement Team South Detachment 403. Died on April 24, 2004.

Click on a servicemember's name for more information.

It is the Soldier

It is the soldier, not the reporter,
Who has given us freedom of the press.
It is the soldier, not the poet,
Who has given us the freedom of speech.

It is the soldier, not the campus organizer,
Who has given us the freedom to demonstrate.
It is the soldier, not the lawyer,
Who has given us the right to a fair trial.

It is the soldier,
Who salutes the flag,
Who serves under the flag,
And whose coffin is draped in the flag,
Who allows the protester to burn the flag.


What are the long-term repercussions?

Laurenti says the issues raised by the oil-for-food investigation pose a challenge to any new attempt to set up comprehensive international sanctions regime. "The question is now whether you can get the Security Council to agree to absolute or comprehensive sanctions ever again because the whole experience and then the intense scrutiny of the kind of corruption between the business suppliers and the Baghdad regime and the implications of UN corruption have discredited sanctions as a tool in the eyes of many," said Laurenti. Russia and China have recently blocked sanctions initiatives toward Sudan and Iran in the Council, repeatedly questioning the validity of sanctions. The U.S.-funded GAO said in a report in May 2006 that the oil-for-food program offers many lessons for future sanctions programs. From the outset, it said, such programs should:

  • assess whether the sanctions program gives undue control to the sanctioned country
  • consider the economic impact that sanctions have on neighboring countries
  • establish clear authority and responsibility for management, oversight, and monitoring activities
  • and ensure that they have the resources and independence needed for effective oversight.

Meanwhile, says Heritage’s Gardner, investigations will likely continue. "We’re going to see more and more national governments launching probes," he said. "We’ve seen the tip of the iceberg in terms of what we’re dealing with. I think the fallout from oil for food will be around for many years to come."


Prodi condemns Iraq war as 'grave mistake'

The incoming Italian prime minister, Romano Prodi, today described the US-led invasion of Iraq as a "grave mistake" that had encouraged global terrorism.

Mr Prodi, who narrowly won last month's general election, said he would consult with US-led forces in Iraq over Italian troop withdrawal.

"We consider the war and occupation in Iraq a grave error that hasn't solved - but has complicated - the problem of security," he said in his first address to the Senate since becoming prime minister.

"Terrorism has found a new base and new excuses for internal and external terrorist action."

Mr Prodi said his government would participate in anti-terror operations if they were sanctioned by international organisations such as the UN.

"We are convinced participants in the war against terrorism, even militarily, when it is legitimised by an international organisation to which we belong," he added.

Mr Prodi did not give a precise timeline for the withdrawal of Italian troops, saying only that it would happen after consultation with the Iraqi authorities.

"It is the intention of this government to propose to parliament the return of our troops from Iraq," he said.

The incoming prime minister said he intended to continue Italy's historically good relations with Washington. However, his views on the invasion and occupation of Iraq will put him on a collision course with both the White House and Downing Street.

Tony Blair has repeatedly denied that the London bombings in July last year were linked to the British involvement in Iraq.

Mr Prodi's coalition won April's election by the smallest margin in modern Italian political history. During the campaign, he promised to withdraw the Italian troops that his conservative rival, Silvio Berlusconi, had sent to Iraq.

Mr Berlusconi, elected in 2001, was the longest-serving leader of his country since the second world war.

He was a staunch supporter of the Iraq conflict despite its huge unpopularity in Italy - where thousands have marched against it - and faced regular calls to withdraw the 3,000 Italian troops.

Demands for withdrawal grew after an Italian secret service agent, Nicola Calipari, was killed by US soldiers minutes after rescuing a journalist being held hostage last March.

Mr Prodi, then the opposition leader, said it was time to discuss the end of Italy's mission in Iraq, and Mr Berlusconi - in an apparent attempt to shore up domestic support - said troops would be withdrawn from Iraq by last September.

However, he backtracked on that commitment after receiving a call from the US president, George Bush.


The Friday Cover

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In the early 2000s, before working with his uncle, Hunter had opened a lobbying practice that landed clients with interests that overlapped with Joe’s committee assignments and legislative priorities. Ahead of his father’s second presidential bid, he entered the hedge fund business with James.

These entanglements could pose problems for Democrats as they seek to draw a contrast with President Donald Trump, who they accuse of corruption for mixing politics with his own family’s business ventures.

“Joe Biden needs to recognize it’s a problem,” said Richard Painter, a former chief White House ethics lawyer in the George W. Bush era, who recently became a Democrat. Painter said Biden should pledge that if he were elected president, he would ask his relatives to refrain from business practices that could pose ethical quandaries, such as taking foreign sources of financing.

“You can’t control your brothers. You can’t control your grown son. But you can put some firewalls in place in your own office,” Painter said.


The Wars of Iraq

Iraq, as we know it today, did not exist prior to World War One. For several hundred years prior to the First World War, the mostly Arab region known as Mesopotamia lay within the Turkish Ottoman Empire. During that war, the British invaded Ottoman Mesopotamia, finally conquering the area. The peace treaty that ended Turkey's part in World War One, caused the Turks to give up control of Mesopotamia, which became known by the older name, Iraq. The new Iraq was under British control at first, a fact which caused a great deal of unrest. The current borders of Iraq and most Middle Eastern nations, such as Syria and Palestine/Israel, were drawn by the conquering Europeans, often with little regard to the preferences of the people who were to live in these newly created nations.

Thus, Iraq became a nation with three large demographic groups the Sunni Kurds in the north, the Sunni (Sunna) Arabs in the middle of the country, and the Shiite (Shia) Arabs in the south. The Kurds wanted a nation of their own, as did the Kurds living in neighboring Turkey and Iran. Though the British eventually granted full independence to Iraq, it was not without much bloodshed and hard feelings in Iraq about the long occupation.

Below is a list, with some details, on the wars and conflicts of Iraq, from the First World War to the current Iraqi Civil War involving the Jihadi Islamic State. World War One 1914-1918 -Also known as the Great War, this conflict brought about the end of the Turkish Ottoman Empire, which aligned itself with the German-led Central Powers. The Turks fought largely against the British Empire forces mostly in Ottoman Palestine, and Ottoman Mesopotamia, and the Russian Empire in the Caucasus region and neighboring Iran. In November, 1914, British forces landed at Basra, in what is now southern Iraq. Despite a serious British defeat at al-Kut in 1916, Baghdad fell to the British army in March, 1917. By November, 1918, the British had gained control over most of the Ottoman vilayets (provinces) that formed Iraq.

The Great Iraqi Revolution (known in Iraq as Ath Thawra al Iraqiyya al Kubra and by the British as the Arab Revolt of 1920 )May 1920-Feb. 1921 -Rebellion by Iraqi Arabs against the rule of the British Mandate. The rebellion was suppressed by the British military. This can be considered the First Anglo-Iraqi War.


Watch the video: Mongolian Troops English Class in Iraq May 2006